January 19th, 2012 | University

Yale scientist suggests “G-spot” isn’t real

Edouard Manet's "A Bar at the Folies-Bergère."
Edouard Manet's "A Bar at the Folies-Bergère." Photo by Wikimedia Commons.

Yale urologist Amichai Kilchevsky published a study in the Jan. 12 issue of the Journal of Sexual Medicine suggesting that the fabled “G-spot,” the erogenous zone inside the vagina purported to provide intense pleasure during intercourse, does not exist.

To find evidence of the G-spot, Kilchevsky ran a search of published work between 1950 and 2011 using keywords like G-spot, Gräfenberg spot, female orgasm, female erogenous zone and others that are less safe for work.

“Objective measures have failed to provide strong and consistent evidence for the existence of an anatomical site that could be related to the famed G-spot,” Kilchevsky wrote.

Such objective measures, the study notes, have included everything from “digital stimulation” to MRI scans over the past decade. Kilchevsky notes that “modern investigative techniques” may provide more evidence in the future. The study claims the majority of women believe in the G-spot, which Kilchevsky said is thanks to a myth perpetuated by the porn industry and the public media.

“My view is that the G-spot is really just the extension of the clitoris on the inside of the vagina, analogous to the base of the male penis,” Kilchevsky said in the report.