FIELD HOCKEY | Bulldogs claim Ivy title

The women’s field hockey team won its first Ivy League Championship since 1980 with a win against Brown on Saturday.
The women’s field hockey team won its first Ivy League Championship since 1980 with a win against Brown on Saturday. Photo by Brianne Bowen.

Just seven minutes into the game, midfielder/back Georgia Holland ’14 launched toward the net with a six-game winning streak and an Ivy League title hanging in the balance.

The rest is history.

Among cheering crowds chanting “Ivy Champions”, the Yale field hockey team (11–6, 6–1 Ivy) capped one of its greatest record-breaking seasons as it won its second Ivy League Championship in 31 years Saturday, 7–0, over the Brown Bears (4–13, 0–7).

“The game was unbelievable,” forward Mia Rosati ’12 said. “I’m going to remember it forever.”

Going into the game, the Bulldogs wanted nothing less than a win. After six straight wins, midfielder Dinah Landshut ’12 said the Elis had gained the focus and energy necessary to clinch the Ivy title. Landshut added that it has always been the team’s goal to win the Ivy Championship.

“It was such an amazing feeling to eventually achieve what only one Yale field hockey team has done before,” she said.

And the Bulldogs ensured that they dominated right from the start, reminding the Bears why they are ranked number one in the Ancient Eight.

After Holland’s goal at 7:06, the Bulldogs never looked back.

Six minutes later, Rosati torpedoed a pass from forward Erica Borgo ’14 to make it 2–0. But Yale did not stop there.

As Brown missed its penalty corners and goalkeeper Emily Cain ’14 kicked the ball out, back Taylor Sankovich ’12 blasted a corner goal at 21:40, assisted by Borgo and forward/midfielder Emily Schuckert ’14. Just four minutes later, Schuckert set up forward Kirsten Krebs ’12, who drilled in the corner to bring up a distinct 4–0 into halftime.

But Brown was not a weak team. Back Erin Carter ’12 said the Bears were capable of overturning the score, which was part of why the Bulldogs shot relentlessly at every scoring opportunity.

“Brown wasn’t a team that would give up,” Carter said. “We had to continue to work hard and keep the game in our control.”

Yale’s four-goal lead was clear at the half. But head coach Pam Stuper said the team did not change its attitude and kept the momentum going into the second half.

Carter struck one seven minutes into the second half, assisted by Borgo and midfielder/back Chelsey Locarno ’12.

Cain blocked a close ball two minutes later, and Krebs drilled her second shot of the game at 60:33 to make it 6–0. As goalkeeper Heather Schlesier ’12 stepped in, she preserved the shutout with a pair of saves.

Even with a decisive win three minutes left in the game, Carter blasted a penalty corner — her 18th goal of the season — marking the final score 7–0.

The Bulldogs tightly pushed the Bears from any shots during the entire game, allowing just six shots, and recorded an overwhelming 51–6 shot advantage. Even with 20 saves, Brown goalkeeper Shannon McSweeney could not handle the Bulldog offense.

The game marked Yale’s third shutout of the season, which Carter attributes to the team’s hard work ethic and individual responsibility.

An integral part was the combination of goalkeepers Cain, Schlesier, and Ona McConnell ’13.

“Our hard work, focus and energy has paid off this season,” Landshut added. “We could not be more happy.”

But the field hockey team’s success goes beyond the league. The Bulldogs concluded their season with single-season school records in goals, 69 and assists, 68. They were ranked no. 20 in the country in winning percentage with .625 and no. 4 in points per game with 183. They were no. 7 in goals per game with 3.88.

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