STERN: New colleges, fresh names

Four reverends, two ministers, two politicians, an inventor, a professor and a preacher walk into a bar. All are white, Christian men. Does this bar look a little stodgy and exclusive? Well, on the door there is a sign that reads, “No shirt, no shoes, no WASPish white antecedents, no service.”

These 11 men represent the namesakes of Yale’s residential colleges, plus two stuffy New England towns, Branford and Saybrook. (You may have noticed this adds up to 13, since Timothy Dwight College was named for both Timothy Dwight IV and Timothy Dwight V.) If we examine these people, they are a pretty homogenous bunch. They include Yale’s first rector (Pierson), a states-rights-loving Southern politician (Calhoun) and a firebrand Evangelical preacher (Jonathan Edwards). And they might not be too thrilled with the amount of diversity that is currently at Yale.

But Yale is diverse, even if you wouldn’t know it looking at the colleges’ namesakes. This is not to insult those for whom the residential colleges were named — these men (all men) and towns played important roles in Yale’s and America’s history, and I thank them. But we are living in the 21st century! It is time to show the world that Yale is a place that welcomes all.

What better way to do this than to name Yale’s new residential colleges after people who are not quite so lily-white? I humbly put forth the names of three individuals worthy of being honored with a residential college in their name. Imagine the message Yale could send the world if the new residential colleges were named for a woman, an African-American or an Hispanic! The individuals listed below are not, however, just suggested because of their race or gender. They are pioneers, writers, social critics, academics, athletes. They have overcome tremendous struggles, faced down adversity, and changed the world.

Christine “Chris” Ernst (B.A., 1976): Christine “Chris” Ernst came to Yale in 1972. It was an institution that had only recently become co-ed, so sexism was everywhere. On the Yale lightweight crew team, the men taunted and harassed the female rowers, even while the female rowers had insufficient access to facilities. After practicing, the women were forced to wait on the freezing bus for the men to shower before the women could return to Yale to finally shower. Many women eventually became sick because of this treatment; some even caught pneumonia. Fed up, Ernst called the New York Times, and led 19 rowers to remove their sweatshirts in front of a photographer, the words “Title IX” written on their bare chests and backs. Ernst then read a passionate statement to the press. Ernst’s now famous protest brought national attention to gender inequality in athletics across the country. Ernst would go on to become an Olympian and 1986 world champion (lightweight women’s double sculls).

Henry Louis Gates (B.A., 1973; Professor, 1976-’85): Born in segregated pre-civil rights West Virginia, Henry Louis Gates would eventually graduate summa cum laude from Yale in 1973, later obtaining a Ph.D. from Cambridge University. Gates would go on to teach at Yale for nearly 10 years before he was controversially denied tenure. Gates is now the Alphonse Fletcher Professor at Harvard University, where he is also the director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Center for African and African-American Research. Gates is a passionate and outspoken advocate for African-American intellectual and educational equality. He has written prominently about the importance of including black literature in the larger canon of classic literature, and he has testified in court to defend rap groups charged with obscenity, groups he claimed were embracing the African-American vernacular. A MacArthur Genius Grant recipient, Gates was once named one of Time Magazine’s “25 Most Influential Americans.”

Sonia Sotomayor (J.D., 1979): Sonia Sotomayor was raised in the housing projects of the Bronx by Puerto Rican parents who spoke almost no English. Sotomayor herself only became fluent in English after her father died when she was 9 years old. Shortly before this, Sotomayor had been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Still, Sotomayor overcame these troubles and matriculated to Princeton University, where she would prominently advocate for the hiring of Hispanic faculty and graduate summa cum laude. Later, at Yale Law School, Sotomayor was again a fierce advocate for the hiring of Hispanic faculty (and an editor on the Yale Law Journal). In 1998, Sotomayor was appointed to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, and, in 2009, she became the first Hispanic justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

For most of its existence, Yale did not count African Americans, Hispanics or women among its students. But times have changed, and, thankfully, so has Yale. The time has come for Yale to acknowledge a changed world and recognize, in some immeasurably small way, the remarkable contributions made by several of its women and minority graduates.

Scott Stern is a freshman in Branford College.

Comments

  • type_b

    My question is, why take into account race and gender when deciding who to name a college after?

  • Undergrad

    The only problem I have with these names is that they’re all still alive, which wasn’t the case for any of the original colleges. Naming them after living people (who aren’t donors) would create too many political problems. Unfortunately Yale’s discriminatory policies make prominent, dead, Hispanic, black or women alumni hard to find. Bouchet might be a possibility though.

    I think they should name at least one of the new colleges after a scientist, since they’re kind of underrepresented in the current names (only Silliman): Josiah Willard Gibbs comes to mind, or James Dwight Dana.

  • The Anti-Yale

    (Third try: Glitch? Your software is not accepting this post)

    *”. . . and a firebrand Evangelical preacher (Jonathan Edwards). . . “*

    You are being kind. Edwards was a paranoid sadist (read his “Sinners in the hands of an Angry God”) who inflicted centuries of pain and fear and shame on those too uneducated (or too superstitious) to know they were being manipulated by a divine.

    To its shame, Yale has not only enshrined him in Jonathan Edwards residential college but in Jonathan Edwards Center.

    Paul D. Keane

    M. Div. ’80

    • River_Tam

      I’ve read Sinners in the Hands (several times, in fact) and I fail to see how it could be interpreted as the work of a paranoid sadist.

  • ldffly

    Mr. Keane, Jonathan Edwards had a first rate intellect. He was one of the finest minds produced by colonial America.
    Anyone reading this should not simply swallow Mr. Keane’s conclusion whole and dismiss Edwards. I recommend you take a look at some of the late Prof. John Smith’s work (former Yale philosophy department member). Then go to Edwards’ work itself. It’s only fair.

  • JE09

    what about yung wing, the first chinese student to graduate from an american university (yale)? wing college has sort of a nice ring to it and the name would recognize Yale’s early commitment to diversity.

  • JohnnyE

    I am much more bothered by the (counterproductive) fetishization of diversity than I am by the fact that the colleges are all named after white people.

  • terryhughes

    The reasoning of this article pretty clearly leads to Clarence Thomas College. Clarence Thomas, the first Yale Law School African American on the Supreme Court. His prestige, influence, thinking and writing have grown constantly over his tenure on the Court. His leading role in the vindication of the Second Amendment in the Bill of Rights alone is of great historical and legal significance, but far from his only major contribution. And, most importantly, his courageous and consistent approach reflects a profound diversification away from the stale liberal same-old, same old that characterizes the bulk of Yale Law School products. Intellectual diversity, of course, is far more important and significant in every respect than racial diversity. One could go on and on explaining why the author’s reasoning here leads to the doorstep and name of the great Justice Thomas, but why belabor the obvious? (I mean no disrespect to Justice Sonia Sotomayor, but she has plainly not served long enough on the Court to have established a track record of any variety.)

    So why is it that with the arguments so compelling and obvious that Mr. Stern does not even mention Justice Thomas? What could be the reason? Wait, don’t tell me! I’m thinking, I’m thinking.

    • terryhughes

      I might also add that Clarence Thomas rose from a beginning more modest than any other Justice serving in modern times, including Justice Sonia Sotomayor. Further, Thomas’ sincere Catholic faith would stand as a definitive and inclusive break from the blistering anti-Catholic names (names nevertheless worthy) now borne by more than one Yale college (none of which is named after a Catholic), and therefore strike a blow for religious diversity.

    • yalengineer

      I would also remember that Clarence Thomas absolutely HATES Yale. He would probably drive over from DC and burn his own college down.

  • roflairplane

    Henry Gates? Are you kidding me?

  • The Anti-Yale

    You don’t have to swallow anything. As the great mathematician/philosopher Bertrand Russelln said in “Why I am Not a Christian” (paraphrase): Any religion which would introduce the notion of eternal damnation into reality is in itself inherently evil.

    Jonathan Edwards fanned the fires of humanity’s fear olf Hell —-an imaginary construct created by the warped minds of early christian (with a small c) theology and transformed into a veritable visual feast similar to Disneyland by Dante Aligheri in his “Divine Comedy.”

    It is likely that this elaborate “Skinner Box” (Hell) was created by the primitive subsconscious asa theologians’ way of maintaining efficient social behavior.

    The belief in this bogus artifact of theological humbug has caused untold damage and suffering in human history, not the least of which was The Crusades.

    To hell with Hell.

    Paul D. Keane

    M.Div. ’80

    • River_Tam

      I will now say in my comment: “Bertrand Russell is wrong”.

      Stunning logic!

      • The Anti-Yale

        Try reading Lord Russell’s essay “Why I Am Not a Christian”, voted one of the 100 most influential books of the 2Oth Century.

  • The Anti-Yale

    PS. I delivered the unabridged version of Sinners in the Hands an Angry God (over one hour of brimstone) as part of seven dramatic readings of famous sermons in 1976 which I performed at Marquand and Battell Chapels.

    PK

  • terryhughes

    The criticisms of Jonathan Edwards here reak of a narrow minded stupidity so profound as to amount to a kind of strange beauty. An angry God help us all if Yale is to fall into the hands of such Edwards haters.

    Edwards is widely acknowledged to be America’s most important and original philosophical theologian, and one of America’s greatest intellectuals. His work was broad: defense of Reformed theology, the metaphysics of theological determinism, the Puritan heritage, and a critical role in shaping the First Great Awakening. His significance was recognized by William James in Varieties of Religious Experiences. Recent studies emphasize how Edwards’ work was based on conceptions of beauty, harmony, and ethical fittingness, and how central The Enlightenment was to his mindset. Edwards many books include The End For Which God Created the World; The Life of David Brainerd, and Religious Affections, which many Reformed Evangelicals read even today. Edwards was genuinely committed to the promotion of gender equality.

    “Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God” is an invaluable American classic. I am not an evangelical or even a protestant, but the insensitive and intolerant hostility to that great sermon evidenced here is on a par with the sentiments that led to the demolition of the Bamyan Buddhas.

    As an aside, Edwards was the grandfather of Aaron Burr.

  • blah

    how about william sloane (sp?) coffin college? the last name is kind of unfortunate, but it would be good for halloween parties.

  • chorleywood

    Bouchet college

  • The Anti-Yale

    I proudly plead guilty to a *”narrow minded stupidity so profound as to amount to a strange beauty.”*

    Here is Wikipedia’s (admittedly pedestrian) definition of the movement the previous poster proclaims Edwards had a *”critical role in shaping”*

    ***The First Great Awakening (or The Great Awakening) was a Christian revitalization movement that swept Protestant Europe and British America, and especially the American colonies in the 1730s and 1740s, leaving a permanent impact American religion. It resulted from powerful preaching that gave listeners a sense of personal guilt and of their need of salvation by Jesus Christ. Pulling away from ritual and ceremony, the Great Awakening made Christianity intensely personal to the average person by fostering a deep sense of spiritual guilt and redemption, and by encouraging introspection and a commitment to a new standard of personal morality.***

    Apparently the previous poster thinks it is some kind of theological, intellectual and/or aesthetic achievement to have filled the hearts of millions of simple peasants with dread and self-loathing, and to bullied them into believing that they can be relieved of that dread and guilt its eternal reward in hellfire only by adopting the the idiosyncratic deity of a bastardized offshoot of Judaism: Joshua be Joseph aka Jesus Christ.

    This is Christianity at it best: Bullying, elitist, paranoid, self-hatred

    Rubbish.

    Paul D. Keane

    M. Div. ‘80

    M.A., M.Ed.

    • terryhughes

      On a par with the sentiments that led to the demolition of the Bamyan Buddhas. Yep, I got it right the first time.

  • The Anti-Yale

    That should have read “Joshua ben Joseph”

  • The Anti-Yale

    PS
    I would not demolish the Buddhas, nor would I demolish the shrines Yale has erected to the Patriarch of Guilt, Sin and Self-loathing.

    Let the Edwards’ shrines hypnotize their self-flagellating devotees, while Ralph Waldo Emerson’s sinless (and trinity-less) Christianity languishes in the dustbins of theologians who prefer to sadistically manipulate their followers with the tripartite punishment/reward Skinner Box of the *Divine* *Comedy,(Inferno / Purgatorio / Paradiso*) rather than liberate them to the sinless / guiltless freedom of post-Emersonian “New Thought.”

    PK

    • terryhughes

      Well, Mr. theantiyale, you have your opinions, vigorously stated pleonasms. Unlike you, Jonathan Edwards offered well expressed reasons for all to read, with which they could disagree or agree, both of which they are still doing centuries later. That’s one mark of Edwards’ continuing greatness. William James thought so, too. MOST people who know about such things say Edwards was a great writer and thinker and religious reformer and generally interesting guy. That is, they don’t agree with your strident absolutisms denigrating one far your better.

      It’s good that you “proudly plead guilty to a ‘narrow minded stupidity so profound as to amount to a strange beauty.'” Appropriate, that. Insight.

      • The Anti-Yale

        I have not had time to respond to your comments directly. You seem a civilized fellow Mr. Hughes, so I will take the time.

        Also, you write with a poison pen, which I admire.

        Regardless of the intellectual subtlety of his thought, the intricacy of his theological crocheting, I am evaluating Edwards on his contribution to humankind.

        It has been a decidedly cruel contribution. There is absolutely no evidence whatsoever that the devil, eternal damnation, and hell exist. If you wish to kowtow to a sacred text, the Old Testament had an afterlife in an underworld called Sheol (the grave, pit, or abyss) but it was a decidedly neutral place; folks simply stumbled around like drunks in a dark barroom. (I had the luxury of taking the late Marvin Pope’s seminar on Sheol at Yale.)

        Hell, eternal punishment and suffering in an inferno, is a delight imagined by christian theologians. Lovely idea.

        You write with verve and intellectual acuity. I cannot imagine why someone like that would wish to surrender his or her destiny and fate to the lugubrious imaginings of Reward/Punishment theologians. That is a device used to keep humanity from murdering, raping and pillaging itself.

        Try the photo-tropism theology of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Or stay in your dark hole if you wish.

        Plato let us know that there is sunlight out there.

        Paul D. Keane

        M. Div. ’80

        M.A., M.Ed.

  • estern123

    Let’s not forget that Clarence Thomas has repeatedly expressed his contempt for Yale and stated he wished he had not attended the law school.

    • terryhughes

      All the more! It would show broadness of mind and generosity of heart for Yale to do it anyway. It would be a sign that Yale can change and advance beyond the less admirable portions of its past, just as Mr. Stern says he desires!

      • bootleg

        It’s one thing to name a building for a politically conservative African American man who has a history of sexual harassment and a 5-years-and-running act of silent protest on the bench. It’s another to name the building after a political figure who is actively and openly hostile to your institution. Broadness of mind and generosity of heart does not entail self-destructive behavior. Nor would naming a building after an individual who holds you in contempt do anything to “advance beyond the less admirable portions” of Yale’s past.

        • terryhughes

          What is it about Justice Thomas being a “politically conservative African American man” that you find objectionable but are ashamed to express explicitly? His being African American or his being conservative?

          Justice Thomas has no “history of sexual harassment.” There were unsupported allegations against him made by a liberal partisan at the time of his appointment, allegations which the Senate rejected. No further evidence of these allegations has ever been adduced. It is preposterous to write of undemonstrated allegations as a “history of sexual harassment.”

          What you characterize as “a 5-years-and-running act of silent protest on the bench” is a refusal to indulge in the kabuki of oral arguments, which many Justices are known to consider a waste of time. Justice Thomas is more honest than the other justices sharing this view, and it is by no means clear that he is wrong in this regard.

          If Yale were to exhibit broadness of mind and generosity of heart people like Justice Thomas would have less justification to be actively and openly hostile to it as an institution or hold it in contempt. I do not share all of them, but Justice Thomas’ opinions are not without foundation or merit, either on the bench or of his alma mater. It is a fact that Clarence Thomas’ reputation and influence continue to grow, and Yale will suffer to the extent it sets its face against history on narrow and eventually meaningless partisan grounds.

          Self destruction? Creative destruction is as much a feature of institutional revival as it is of spititual and economic regeneration. You err seriously by rejecting it. No great university organizes itself around a narrow consistency. “Do I contradict myself? Very well, then I contradict myself, I am large, I contain multitudes.” Truer for universities than even for individuals.

          • bootleg

            I’m not sure how much more “explicitly” I can describe Justice Thomas. You are inferring that I find Justice Thomas “objectionable.” Just because I describe him as politically conservative and African American — both true, by the way — doesn’t mean I find that objectionable. That’s an objection you are embedding into the description, not one that I’ve introduced.

            I am not going to go into a debate with you on this forum about Thomas’s sexual history. He either did things or he didn’t. Allegations are out there, but Thomas himself has denied them. You clearly believe him and that’s fine.

            Also, I think my description of his refusal to indulge in the oral arguments as a “silent protest” is actually right on point. Don’t you?

            Again, the broader point is that I just disagree with you about the benefits of naming part of your institution for someone who actively and openly holds you in contempt.

  • The Anti-Yale

    Harriet Beecher Stowe, publication of whose novel, *Uncle Tom’s Cabin*, in 1851, is considered one of the five causes of the Civil War and therefore the emancipation of 2 million enslaved human beings.

  • The Anti-Yale

    terryhughes,

    I am not denigrating the person Jonathan Edwards. In fact, his furniture used to adorn the dean’s office at yale Divinity School in the 80’s when Aidan Cavaugh occupied that post, and Edwards seemed to have good taste. No, it is the evil caused when those ideas became The Great Awakening, indeed when Christianity becomes any kind of fanatacism, which I denigrate.

    Theologians are dinosaurs talking to other dinosaurs about dinosaur bones.

    When those bones are used for self-flagellation, humanity has a problem.

    PK

  • observer

    Why are you overlooking one of the most contemptible rascals of them all …. that 17th century robber baron, ELI YALE! Perhaps the college – which sold its naming rights to this criminal character for some used books and a few bolts of cloth – should be renamed for someone who brought fame, and fortune our alma mater: WALTER CAMP, ’80, the Father of American Football.

    A member of Skull & Bones like George Bush and John Kerry, Camp was the dominant voice on the various collegiate football rules committees that developed the American game from his time as a player at Yale until his death. He is credited with innovations such as the snap-back from center, the system of downs, and the points system, as well as the introduction of the now-standard offensive arrangement of players (a seven-man offensive line and a four-man backfield consisting of a quarterback, two halfbacks, and a fullback).

    I therefore propose that the school be renamed CAMP COLLEGE, after an alum of whom we can all be proud.

  • The Anti-Yale

    *As an aside, Edwards was the grandfather of Aaron Burr.*

    As an aside, in the 1970’s I was one of 75 members of the Aaron Burr Society.

    PS
    No takers on naming the College Harriet Beecher Stowe College? Where is the feminist support?

  • Pangloss

    There will always be an asterisk hanging over the recognition if it appears the person was chosen for race/gender. Let’s stick to recognizing merit, regardless of race and gender, and let the chips fall where they may.

    • terryhughes

      Here, here!

      And, to avoid divisiveness that would inevitably arise from the use of subjective definitions of “merit,” Yale should use the PEOPLE’s definition of merit as expressed in elections: George Bush College, named for two presidents of the United States who attended Yale College, fits the bill … in humble emulation of Timothy Dwight College. It’s a tragedy for Yale historians and the job-hungry, often disadvantaged citizens of its host city that New Haven is not the site of both Bush presidential libraries, but something may yet be done. Let Yale eschew the soft bigotry of the lowered expectations that attends racial, gender and ethnic criteria, and instead honor the electoral choices of the American people.

      I too would run with Pangloss and choose J.W. Gibbs’ name for the other new college, or that of the greatest modern mathematician, Yale PhD and long-time faculty member, Robert Phelan Langlands. For those not familiar with the modern and still very much alive genius Langlands, here’s the generally reliable Wikipedia article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Langlands. As a sop to “diversity,” Langlands would be the very first Canadian after whom a Yale college is named.
      Enjoy!

  • The Anti-Yale

    Merit: Took on hypocritcal Christian pulpits and forced them to recognize that slavery was a *de facto* EVIL, by writing *Uncle Tom’s Cabin,* which became the most published volume in the world in the 1850’s second only to the Bible. Harriet Beecher Stowe deserves to have a Yale college named after her NOT because of her gender or her championing of racial equality, but because of her GUTS.

  • Pangloss

    Some may disagree with past conclusions on “merit,” but in the absence of an established and public consensus, we don’t exactly have the option of undoing those. Edwards might be a case in point that that merit is subject to historical context and changing attitudes. H.B. Stowe is a reasonable choice, but I am not aware of her personal connection to Yale, other than maybe some family members or that she had possibly spent time in New Haven County (Henry Ward Beecher residence…?).

    I think J.W. Gibbs would be a strong choice, and we maybe should overlook that he is neither a minority nor a female. On the plus side, he is arguably the greatest American-born scientist and he spent his entire life learning and teaching at Yale University.

  • ldffly

    On the merits of the case, I would run with Pangloss and choose Gibbs.

    However, since a few have mentioned Stowe, who has no direct connection with Yale, I’ll head in that direction and suggest my 5th gr grandfather Herman Husband. He was a leader in the Carolina Regulator Movement and became a target of Alexander Hamilton at the time of the Whiskey Rebellion. Why not? No Yale connection whatsoever and the name would be great for the female students. “Husband College–live here, study here, find one here.”

  • The Anti-Yale

    *However, since a few have mentioned Stowe, who has no direct connection with Yale*

    Don’t make me laugh,

    How may I ask would a woman in the 18th/19th Century have a “direct connection with Yale”?
    Sexism precluded that, unless she wished to serve tea at her professor husband’s receptions.

    **Harriet Beecher (Stowe) was the daughter of Lyman Beecher, Class of 1797.**

    http://www.library.yale.edu/div/beecher.html

    Bibliography of the
    Lyman Beecher Lectureship on Preaching
    Yale Divinity School
    New Haven, Connecticut
    INTRODUCTION
    The Lyman Beecher Lectureship on Preaching at Yale Divinity School was established April 12, 1871 by a gift of ten thousand dollars from Henry W. Sage, esq. in memory of Lyman Beecher (1775-1863), a member of the Yale College class of 1797. Beecher was a Presbyterian and Congregationalist minister who held pastorates in East Hampton, Long Island, New York, Litchfield, Connecticut, and Boston, Massachusetts. He was also the first President of Lane Theological Seminary in Cincinnati, Ohio.

  • River_Tam

    As a non-white, non-Anglo-Saxon non-Protestant, non-male, let me assure Mr. Stern that we do not particularly care if our colleges are named after people like him, or people like me.

    • bfa123

      For what it’s worth, I’ve been told that Mr. Stern is also “non-Anglo Saxon non-Protestant” (non-Christian, as well)

  • Yalie

    I suspect that whatever the merits or otherwise of the names suggested here, Yale will favor those with a Yale College connection and will disqualify *any* living person. Maybe they should just select a couple more Connecticut towns…

  • The Anti-Yale

    *I suspect that whatever the merits or otherwise of the names suggested here, Yale will favor those with a Yale College connection and will disqualify any living person.*

    Harriet Beecher Stowe does not fall into either of these disqualifying categories. My hunch is she will be disqualified because she *[Uncle Tom's Cabin][1]* has been sentimentalized for a century.

    [1]: http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/books/2011/06/13/110613crbo_books_gordonreed

  • jamesdakrn

    How bout Amistad College, after the slave ship Amistad?

    The trial was in New Haven, and apparently “Yale students and professors befriended the captives, and divinity professor Josiah Willard Gibbs famously went to the wharves of New York to find a sailor who could speak their language”

    I think this actually has merit.

  • The Anti-Yale

    How about[**Douglas Clyde Macintosh**:][1] Forty years at Yale; Dwight Professor of Theology; Founded Graduate Department of Religion; fought [*U. S. v Macintosh (1931*)][2] for the right to “selective conscientious objection.” His estate was left to Yale for a fellowship in his name which has been abandoned by Yale and absorbed into the general scholarship fund.

    Yes.

    [1]: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douglas_Clyde_Macintosh
    [2]: http://www.law.yale.edu/news/8334.htm

  • The Anti-Yale

    [Douglas Clyde Macintosh Centennial][1] at http://dcmcentennial.blogspot.com

    [1]: http://dcmcentennial.blogspot.com

  • The Anti-Yale

    He [Douglas Clyde Macintosh] was my key teacher at Yale. I still like to deal with his position when I teach contemporary theology. I wish we could recognize the Macintosh Fellows as allowed for in Hope Macintosh’s will. He deserves to be remembered with affection and with honor as one of Yale’s great persons.

    (the late) Randolph Crump Miller
    Horace Bushnell Professor of Christian Nurture
    Yale University Divinity School
    [http://dcmcentennial.blogspot.com/2011/01/randolph-crump-miller.html][1]

    [1]: He [Douglas Clyde Macintosh] was my key teacher at Yale. I still like to deal with his position when I teach contemporary theology. I wish we could recognize the Macintosh Fellows as allowed for in Hope Macintosh’s will. He deserves to be remembered with affection and with honor as one of Yale’s great persons. (the late) Randolph Crump Miller Horace Bushnell Professor of Christian Nurture Yale University Divinity School http://dcmcentennial.blogspot.com/2011/01/randolph-crump-miller.html

  • The Anti-Yale

    *From the posts:*

    **Josiah Willard Gibbs
    James Dwight Dana
    Clarence Thomas
    Edward Alexander Bouchet, Ph.D
    William Sloane Coffin
    Harriet Beecher Stowe
    Walter Camp
    George (H.W.) (W.) Bush
    Robert Phelan Langlands
    Herman Husband
    Amistad
    Douglas Clyde Macintosh**

    *From the article:*

    **Christine “Chris” Ernst
    Henry Louis Gates
    Sonia Sotomayor**

    Expect this list when presented to Woodbridge Hall to receive benign neglect and intransigent equivocation in response, the heartbeats of effective administrators.

    PK

  • The Anti-Yale

    *From the posts:*

    **Josiah Willard Gibbs

    James Dwight Dana

    Clarence Thomas

    Edward Alexander Bouchet, Ph.D

    William Sloane Coffin

    Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Walter Camp

    George (H.W.) (W.) Bush

    Robert Phelan Langlands

    Herman Husband

    Amistad

    Douglas Clyde Macintosh**

    *From the article:*

    **Christine “Chris” Ernst

    Henry Louis Gates

    Sonia Sotomayor**

    Expect this list when presented to Woodbridge Hall to receive benign neglect and intransigent equivocation in response, the heartbeats of effective administrators.

    PK

    • observer

      Surely Cotton Mather should be on your list!

      This fire and brimstone divine was as responsible as any man for Yale’s existence. Admittedly a Harvard graduate (as were all of the conservative clergymen among the founders) Cotton Mather swore revenge when his alma mater refused to choose him as successor to his dotty daddy, Increase Mather, ousted as president of Harvard in 1701. Mather then encouraged other clergymen (including his cousin, Samuel Mather), to found a new, more godly school in Connecticut.

      When the “Collegiate School” seemed likely to go under, it was Cotton Mather who rode to the rescue – persuading an exiled robber baron named Eli Yale to help the place stave off bankruptcy in exchange for naming it after him. Mather flattered the old reprobate by assuring him that “your munificence might easily obtain for you such a commemoration and perpetuation of your valuable name, which would indeed be much better than an Egyptian pyramid.”

      The Cotton Mather legacy persists, even down to the present day, when we can imagine that President Levin utilizes the same flattering tactic in soliciting large gifts for the endowment!

  • The Anti-Yale

    And that little cottony oedipal battle would ultimately result in the legacy of Unitarian liberalism (and of Ralph Waldo Emerson) at Harvard and of Trinitarian orthodoxy at Yale (until christianity was dethroned as the university religion a few years ago).

    ***BTW, in case Mr. Hughes (aka terryhughes) missed it, here is my reply:***

    I have not had time to respond to your comments directly. You seem a civilized fellow Mr. Hughes, so I will take the time.

    Also, you write with a poison pen, which I admire.

    Regardless of the intellectual subtlety of his thought, the intricacy of his theological crocheting, I am evaluating Edwards on his contribution to humankind.
    It has been a decidedly cruel contribution. There is absolutely no evidence whatsoever that the devil, eternal damnation, and hell exist. If you wish to kowtow to a sacred text, the Old Testament had an afterlife in an underworld called Sheol (the grave, pit, or abyss) but it was a decidedly neutral place; folks simply stumbled around like drunks in a dark barroom. (I had the luxury of taking the late Marvin Pope’s seminar on Sheol at Yale.)

    Hell, eternal punishment and suffering in an inferno, is a delight imagined by christian theologians. Lovely idea.

    You write with verve and intellectual acuity. I cannot imagine why someone like that would wish to surrender his or her destiny and fate to the lugubrious imaginings of Reward/Punishment theologians. That is a device used to keep humanity from murdering, raping and pillaging itself.

    Try the photo-tropism theology of Ralph Waldo Emerson. Or stay in your dark hole if you wish.

    Plato let us know that there is sunlight out there.

    Paul D. Keane

    M. Div. ’80

    M.A., M.Ed.

    • observer

      to theantiyale:

      It sounds,poor fellow, as if you attended the wrong divinity school some years ago, and have regretted it ever since!

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harvard_Divinity_School

      Of course Harvard’s run of 9 consecutive Unitarian presidents is long over, and most Unitarians (of who I am admittedly one by birth) no longer much bother with God – let alone the Devil.

      Most of them, I dare say, are less concerned with the theological ramblings in Emerson’s Divinity School Address than they are with Paul Krugman’s latest political fulminations in the NY Times.

      • terryhughes

        Unitarians are concerned with Paul Krugman’s political fulminations in the NY Times? Really? Deranged Yalie Krugman lets loose with these hate-emmissions today:

        “What happened after 9/11 — and I think even people on the right know this, whether they admit it or not — was deeply shameful. The atrocity should have been a unifying event, but instead it became a wedge issue. Fake heroes like Bernie Kerik, Rudy Giuliani, and, yes, George W. Bush raced to cash in on the horror. And then the attack was used to justify an unrelated war the neocons wanted to fight, for all the wrong reasons. A lot of other people behaved badly. How many of our professional pundits — people who should have understood very well what was happening — took the easy way out, turning a blind eye to the corruption and lending their support to the hijacking of the atrocity? The memory of 9/11 has been irrevocably poisoned; it has become an occasion for shame. And in its heart, the nation knows it.”

        Yuck! “Deeply shameful,” “atrocity,” “wedge issue,” “fake heroes,” “cash in on the horror,” “justify an unrelated war,” “all the wrong reasons,” “blind eye to the corruption,” “hijacking of the atrocity,” “irrevocably poisoned,” “occasion for shame.”

        This is what happens when one is “liberated” to the “sinless / guiltless freedom of post-Emersonian ‘New Thought?” Looks like Krugman has invented his own hell every bit as well furnished with negativities and shame as anything Jonathan Edwards imagined, and Unitarians have just hopped right on in! SINNERS IN THE HANDS OF AN ANGRY BURNT OUT ECONOMIST!

        Krugman ends his current nuttiness with “I’m not going to allow comments on this post, for obvious reasons.” What a card!

        • observer

          I saw that. I have felt for some time that Krugman is mentally ill.

          • terryhughes

            Krugman at his best: Bullying, elitist, paranoid, self-hatred. Mentally ill? Could be. And now he doubles down, while descending further into incoherent gibberish posing as “explanation:”

            http://krugman.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/09/12/more-about-the-911-anniversary/

            These do appear to be similar to the rantings of those who need to increase a dosage that is already rather substantial. I especially like his “memory” of the immediate post 9/11 period as a time in which “any criticism was denounced as treason… and much more tolerance than one might have feared.”

            Ah, yes, Mr. Krugman. Anything you say, Mr. Krugman. The Unitarians are listening carefully to every word you say, Mr. Krugman. Look around you, all you see is sympathetic eyes.

  • The Anti-Yale

    Nooooo. I attended the right divinity school and have never regretted it, nor my friendship with the author of *Here I Stand: A Life of Martin Luther* as he lived out the final years of his eighties at that school.[link text][1]

    [1]: http://doctorbainton.blogspot.com

  • The Anti-Yale

    PS

    My parents named me after [a guy they knew at the divinity school][1]. I never gave the idea of attending YDS at minute’s thought until I was 30 and it was thrust upon me by Fate. I have never used the M. Div. degree for any professional advancement. It is simply something I went through to discover the truth, an inconvenient one for posters here:

    **The truth is that no one KNOWS the truth and that’s the truth.**

    PK

    [1]: http://dcmcentennial.blogspot.com

  • murphytemple

    I would be willing to bet money that we’ll have a Kingman Brewster College.

    • Branford73

      I would love that but I’ll be surprised. I think there are still too many Kingman haters alive.
      I predict Gibbs and Ives. But Amistad is a great idea.

  • The Anti-Yale

    How about a member of the Yale Board of Trustees, the late Bishop Paul Moore.
    Read “The Bishop’s Daughter” in [*The New Yorker*][1] to see that he was a thorughly modern, complex human being.
    I had the privilege of knowing him and admired his intellectual courage.

    [1]: http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/03/03/080303fa_fact_moore

  • observer

    How about CLINT FRANK, All-American and Heisman Trophy winner in 1937. Skull $ Bones, as well!
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e7/Clint_Frank.jpg

  • The Anti-Yale

    I can see Walter Camp (although I am not sure that being the inventor of a game which produces traumatic brain injury is particulalrly noble), but what is it about a football ***player*** other than bodily-kinesthetic prowess, which would qualify him to have an Ivy league academic residential college named in his honor. Was he especially philanthropic wih the rest of his years onnthe planet?

  • The Anti-Yale

    Just came to mind—and it’s so obvious: THORNTON WILDER.

  • The Anti-Yale

    and CHARLES IVES

  • The Anti-Yale

    Last but not least, WILLIAM F. BUCKLEY,JR., whose writings alerted me that man is God at Yale; and to whom I dedicated my blog [The Anti-Yale][1]

    [1]: http://theantiyale.blogspot.com

  • observer

    WILLIAM HUNTINGTON RUSSELL …. the founder of Skull & Bones!
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:William_Huntington_Russell_Yale_class_of_1833.jpg

  • The Anti-Yale

    When an apology is offered for the theft of Geronimo’s skull and the skull is returned.

  • The Anti-Yale

    **Latest Tally (Is there even a student on a Naming Committee?)**

    *From the posts*:

    **Josiah Willard Gibbs

    James Dwight Dana

    Clarence Thomas

    Edward Alexander Bouchet, Ph.D

    William Sloane Coffin

    Harriet Beecher Stowe

    Walter Camp

    George (H.W.) (W.) Bush

    Robert Phelan Langlands

    Herman Husband

    Amistad

    Douglas Clyde Macintosh

    Kingman Brewster, Jr.

    Bishop Paul Moore

    Clint Frank

    Thornton Wilder

    Charles Ives

    William F. Buckley, Jr.

    William Huntington Russell**

    *From the article:*

    **Christine “Chris” Ernst

    Henry Louis Gates

    Sonia Sotomayor**

    NOTE: of the 22 (23) names, ONLY THREE ARE ARTISTS—Stowe, Wilder. and Ives (But BIG artists, at that.)

  • Mikelawyr2

    What about naming a college after Yale’s first female alum, Renee Richards f/k/a Richard Raskin?

  • Mikelawyr2

    How about Lennon College and Harrison College?