Bingham card reader destroyed

An electronic key card reader located at Bingham Hall was damaged Saturday night by an unknown person whom police have not caught.

Yale Police spokesman Lt. Steven Woznyk said in an e-mail that YPD officers responded to Bingham entryway B Sunday morning and found that the card reader was pulled from its mount. He said that the door remained closed and secure, and the police confirmed that all other card readers in Bingham were intact and operable. The broken card reader was reported to Physical Plant, and it has now been repaired, Woznyk added.

“We’re still trying to figure out what happened,” said Calhoun College Master Jonathan Holloway. Calhoun freshman live in that entryway of Bingham.

Holloway added that there are no reports of injured persons or stolen items from Saturday evening, but that “we have people who were clearly upset.”

There was also a report of a suspicious person in Bingham on Saturday evening, but Woznyk said there was no obvious connection between the two incidents.

Woznyk said that at 4:31 Sunday morning, YPD officers responded to the residential hall on a report of a male in a suite. He added that the complainant did not recognize him, so the police were called.

Further investigation, however, revealed that the person who entered the suite was another Yale student and was in fact a guest of one of the residents in that suite, he said.

Suites and bedrooms have individual locks in Bingham, but the common practice of propping a door open with a clothes hanger allows for many suites to be easily entered.

This is not the first report of unauthorized suite entry this year. On Sept. 16, an originally unidentified intruder in Saybrook entered several suites while students were sleeping. Two days later, a Saybrugian came forward and admitted to being the intruder.

In 2008, the University approved campuswide bedroom locks after several petty thefts in 2007. But Facilities faced difficulty in securing funding and navigating fire regulations.

Each lock costs between $120 and $180, Norman Brody, associate director of lock facilities, said last fall.

Jonathan Edwards, Berkeley, Silliman, Arnold Hall, Calhoun and Morse colleges have room locks installed.

Sam Greenberg contributed reporting.

Comments

  • Daniel Zelaya

    Can Yale really not do any better than spending so much money on each lock? Perhaps some trips to The Home Depot or Lowe’s can help…

    > In 2008, the University approved campuswide bedroom locks after several petty thefts in 2007. But Facilities faced difficulty in securing funding and navigating fire regulations.

    > Each lock costs between $120 and $180, Norman Brody, associate director of lock facilities, said last fall.

  • harbinger

    “Can Yale really not do any better than spending so much money on each lock? Perhaps some trips to The Home Depot or Lowe’s can help…”
    Yale has to “student proof” the locks as much as possible. Your run of the mill lock from Lowes isn’t designed for the continual abuse these lock’s receive. As an aside, the reader wasn’t repaired by Physical Plant personnel. The electronics are the responsibility of Security, and it was repaired by thier contractor. I found that out after several attempts to get a reader fixed. Trying to get a door problem fixed around here means several different people get to look at it before they pass the buck to the next group. I’ve tried Physical Plant for quite a few issues, but always seem to wind up having to deal with Security to get it fixed, or at least get the ball rolling. The Yale Physical Plant staff are slow to say the least.

  • Bingham14

    “Further investigation, however, revealed that the person who entered the suite was another Yale student and was in fact a guest of one of the residents in that suite, he said.”

    I don’t know with whom the YDN discussed this event, but as a girl who lives in Bingham in the entryway where the suspicious person was Saturday night (well actually early Sunday morning) and who was absolutely terrified when YPD burst in my room at 5 a.m. looking for the suspect, I can tell you that this is absolutely false. The suspicious man was NOT a guest of anyone in that suite or any other in my entryway. He was a stranger, and they still don’t know who it was or why it happened.