Classes during Bulldog Days not to be missed

American Studies 191b – The Formation of Modern American Culture (FORMAC) taught by Matthew Jacobson. Tuesday 11:30-12:45. Law School auditorium.

An annual favorite making use of music, video and interesting literature to examine American cultural history in the modern and postmodern eras from a different persepctive. Among other things, the class focuses on the popular cultures of working peoples and the political and social meanings of cultural conflict.



Computer Science 180b – Computers and the Law taught by Robert Dunne. Monday 11:30-12:20. SSS 114.

One of the most popular courses offered. While computer science may sound daunting, Dunne is engaging and the material is interesting and practical. It is a survey and exploration of legal issues arising from the use of computers in contemporary society, particularly in the context of the Internet.



English 170b – Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales taught by Lee Patterson. Monday 10:30-11:20. LC 101.

Patterson is a renowned Chaucer expert, and a great lecturer. He will make you rethink everything high school English taught you about the book, and his class is a good example of lectures in the department.



History 122b – War and Society US 1865-Present taught by Mary Habeck. Monday 10:30-11:20. SSS 114.

Another very popular class, this course covers military history. Habeck is a popular lecturer and very accessible to students. On Monday, the class will cover changes in the army after Vietnam.



Psychology 110b – Introduction to Psychology taught by Marvin Chun. Monday 1-2:15. SSS 114.

Always a popular class, students particularly like Chun. The class iss practical and the material both basic and interesting. It is a survey of major psychological approaches to the biological, cognitive and social bases of behavior.



Theater Studies 11b – Survey of Theater and Drama taught by Jill Lane. Tuesday 2:30-3:20. 220 York St. 101.

This class is a prerequisite for theater majors, and a must for any students interested in the field. The course is an introduction to theater history, aesthetic theories, and performance techniques, from the Elizabethan Renaissance to the present.

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