muscosportsphotos.com

The Elis suffered a heartbreaking loss Monday against last year’s NCAA champion No. 22 Maryland while on the road.

The only goal of the game came 36 seconds before the end of the first overtime period. Currently ranked No. 21, this marks the Bulldogs’ first loss of the 2019 campaign.

The Elis (9–1–2, 3–0–0 Ivy) took early control of the game, as has become tradition for this team. The Bulldogs outshot the Terps (8–4–2, 2–1–2 Big 10) 5–2 and managed a 5–1 advantage in corner kicks after the first 90 minutes of play. After switching formations, Maryland eventually found its stride, outshooting Yale 5–4 by the end of the second period. The winning goal in the 100th minute was nodded in by opposing defender Johannes Bergmann.

The 1–0 victory marks Maryland’s fourth win of the season over a ranked opponent. Despite the loss, the Bulldogs remain perfect in Ancient Eight play as they head into Saturday’s away game against Penn (5–5–2, 1–1–1).

“I think it’s obviously never easy to lose a game, especially one that I felt we had within our grasp,” goalkeeper Elian Haddock ’22 said. “Monday night was a humbling experience but we’re now even more fired up for Saturday than we would’ve been given a different result. I think we’ll come out really strong against Penn.”

Both teams came to Monday’s game in top form, with the Terps having recently achieved a dominant 3–1 victory against No. 6 Indiana. For their part, the Bulldogs have been on their longest winning streak since 1935. The Elis seemed to have continuously scored in the opening moments of the game, but the assistant referee announced the attempt missed by three inches upon review.

After struggling against a strong Yale offensive, the Terps changed tactics and adopted a new 3–5–2 formation. The new alignment allowed Maryland to find opportunities with opposing midfielder Eli Crognale launching a wide volley and opposing forward Eric Matzelevich just missing the right corner. Despite being one down in shots, Yale maintained its edge in the second half and had a 4–1 advantage in corner kicks.

Back on the field for overtime, the Terps were awarded a controversial corner kick in the 100th minute, which presented their best chance to take the game away from Yale. Off the corner from Crognale, Bergmann struck the game-winner and delivered the Bulldogs’ their first loss of the season.

“It was a tough game where we thought we played better than the Terpins,” forward Paolo Carroll ’22 said. “The team is looking to bounce back from the loss to Maryland and get the win at Penn on Saturday. It will be a tough game against Penn but as always we are up for it and remain confident in our success.”

The Bulldogs will return to the field Saturday for another away game against fellow Ivy foe Penn. The Quakers have mustered up an underwhelming season thus far, tallying five wins in 12 games. Meanwhile, the Elis are confident in their ability to defeat Penn, considering that the loss to Maryland was preceded by a nine-game winning streak — the longest since the 1935–36 team finished 12–0 and won the New England and Intercollegiate championships.

The two programs have drawn three times in the last five meetings, with the most recent result being a 1–1 stalemate at Reese Stadium despite a nine-shot advantage for Yale. The Elis’ last victory over Penn came on home turf in 2012, when forward Peter Jacobson ’14 scored with two minutes remaining to secure a 2–1 win. However, the Bulldogs haven’t won in Philadelphia since a 2–1 victory in 2011. The Elis will hope to end this streak as they seek their first 4–0 Ivy start since the 1991 team won its first four league games on its way to a 5–0–2 Ivy finish.

“The team’s mantra is still the same: we reset, then we go again,” midfielder Enzo Okpoye ’22 said. “Regarding the game against Penn this weekend, we’re motivated, prepared, and we’re going to relish every moment of the challenge.”

The Elis will travel to Philadelphia this Saturday, with the game scheduled to kick off at 7 p.m.

Sophie Kane | sophie.kane@yale.edu

Syimyk Kyshtoobaev | syimyk.kyshtoobaev@yale.edu