Yale Police officers on Monday evening interrogated a black graduate student, Lolade Siyonbola GRD ’19, for more than 15 minutes, after a white graduate student reported Siyonbola to the police for sleeping in the HGS common room.

“You’re in a Yale Building and we need to make sure that you belong here,” one of the officers said to Siyonbola, according to a video of the incident Siyonbola posted to Facebook.

The incident gained significant traction on social media after Siyonbola posted two videos on Facebook on early Tuesday morning — one of her interactions with the white student and another of her interactions with the police. As of Tuesday evening, a video showing her interacting with police has garnered more than 324,000 views, 5,300 reactions, and 9,000 comments. Over 6,000 people have shared it. In the video, Siyonbula accused the police of harassing her.

“I deserve to be here; I paid tuition like everybody else; I am not going to justify my existence here,” Siyonbola told one of the police officers on video after she was asked to “sit tight” while they verified her student information. “I am not going to be harassed.”

A YPD supervisor told Siyonbola in the video that the investigation into her student status was “protocol.”

According to the police officers in the video, Siyonbola’s name was not spelled correctly in a database of student information used by YPD, leading to confusion about her status as a student

Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Dean Lynn Cooley sent an email to all PhD and masters students in the Graduate School on Tuesday evening emphasizing the importance of inclusivity and inviting students to share their comments and concerns in light of the incident.

“Incidents like that of last night remind us of the continued work needed to make Yale a truly inclusive place,” Cooley wrote. “I am committed to redoubling our efforts to build a supportive community in which all graduate students are empowered in their intellectual pursuits and professional goals within a welcoming environment. An essential part of that effort must be a commitment to mutual respect and an open dialog.”

Siyonbola did not immediately respond to request for comment on Tuesday night. Yale Police Chief Ronnell Higgins also did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Britton O’Daly | britton.odaly@yale.edu

  • eliyale

    Why is the YDN not publishing the name of the student who called the police? 911 calls and police reports are disclosable public records. Short of domestic violence, sexual assault, or crimes involving children, it would be standard journalistic practice to name everyone involved in an incident alleging a crime like this. Why is that standard not being observed? I sincerely hope the answer is not some feint attempt to “protect the privacy” of a person who should fully understand the consequences of calling the police on someone — for that person and for themselves.

    • BitchPuddingPII

      Because it’s someone who is part of the Philosophy PhD program. Sarah Braasch, and she has done this to another black student before.
      https://philosophy.yale.edu/people/sarah-braasch

      • Myra

        I was at Yale for 3 years. Fell asleep in the Common Room and the Commuter Lounge a couple of times. Was there working on a paper at 1AM once. No one called the police on me. Nancy is all over this thread bending herself in to a pretzel to make this Sarah girl a “victim” or excuse her behavior. I’m starting to think she is related to the girl, or perhaps one of the voices in the girls head.

      • Mary Ann

        Really? I thought she had asked YPD to check out an unaccompanied young man who she didn’t recognize as a Yale student in the hall near her room. Is there something wrong with that? Have I got the facts wrong? Also, am I wrong about a young man pulling a gun on a couple of Yale women in their own room a couple if weeks ago? Do you think that incident might have influenced anything there?

    • Nancy Morris

      As far as I can tell, nobody is reported here to have “alleged a crime” in this case. Somebody seems to have notified YPD that this student was snoozing in the common room, which seems to have warranted a security check.

      “Why is that standard not being observed?“ What “standard?” I don’t recall EVER seeing the name of a person calling ANY police department to request that the police do a security check disclosed in public. Heck, it’s not generally required that a person calling in such a report even provide their name. Is the hope that self-proclaimed “activists” can reach out of their high dudgeon and harrass that person? To heck with such haters.

    • boolaboola123

      Her name is Sarah Braasch. She is a grad student in the Philosophy department.

      • Mary Ann

        O, my, a nervous, oversensitive philosophy student.

        Who would have imagined such a thing?

        Yes, indeed, let’s all assume racism in her motivations without evidence.

    • Richard Presutti

      um, if you walked into that area and saw a strange person (to you) sleeping in a common area (that is a thing now?) you might do the prudent thing and have the authorities verify. I highly doubt if you approached her and asked her to show ID that she would comply politely…

      • Che Catz

        The prudent thing to do would have been to apologize for turning on the light and then make some sympathetic noises about how awful it is to do an all-nighter. Instead of calling the cops or demanding an ID, she could have simply introduced herself and mentioned which floor she lives on —- and the women would have quickly made the connection that they just live a few doors apart. Instead, Sarah Braasch went out of her way to be an asshat, and the whole thing went live on Facebook.

        • mellow_johnny01

          Seriously.

          The student union at my university (located in urban environment in a big enough metro area in northeast) had this large glass enclosed ballroom, basically, that only ever seemed to be used for hosting posh parties. But all along the walls of the room were the most comfortable couches I’ve ever experienced in my life. I personally used to take a nap there after lunch when I had an afternoon class. Plenty of other students of every conceivable race would also catch naps on the couches (nearly 35k undergrad/grad enrolled). No one messed with anyone. I’m so glad I’m not in college now (let alone high school or middle school. ugh.).

        • Mary Ann

          Hardly anything in your comment is supported by the reported facts.

      • Ken P

        “Strange person” defined as ‘someone with brown skin’. Also, a student has no obligation to “comply” when another student asks for ID. You’re comment doesn’t make any sense.

        • Mary Ann

          There is no such “definition” anywhere in these reports.

          That’s your unsupported contribution.

          Don’t be proud of it.

      • The14th

        Why did it have to involve checking ID at all? She could have been an adult and simply talked to the sleeping person. If you don’t like it say “hey, could you not sleep on the couch in here?” or take it up with the RA. Or just be like most people and simply let it go if it has no impact on your life or property (or school property). There was no reason it had to immediately jump to criminal suspicion.

    • fustalker
      • Nancy Morris

        Thanks for the helpful link. But I don’t understand the “she has done it before” quip. The helpful video records Siyonbola noting that the reporting grad student had called the YPD previously after discovering Siyonbola friend in the hall “because he was black.” Siyonbola doesn’t say that her friend was a Yale student, so this reporting student asked the YPD to investigate a unfamiliar guy she saw in the hall. What’s wrong with that? I wouldn’t do it, but it’s hardly crazy. My neighbor called her private security guards on me the other day because I stood on the public part of her driveway for what she thought was a suspiciously long time.

      • OtterQueen

        That article doesn’t state the caller’s name, either.

    • td2016

      This comment is dead wrong and the people “liking” it are misled. The names of people calling into police departments asking for something to be checked out are not generally disclosed. It’s not even necessary for such a person to leave a name with the police. The only reason the reporting student in this matter is known is Siyonbula’s post.

    • td2016

      I question the motives and the ethics of anyone who wants the name of the student who called the police revealed. Such wide disclosure as claimed here is certainly not standard practice. And who says anyone alleged a crime? And who says she called 911? I don’t see that in this article. Where are you getting this, and if you have no source, ehy are you making it all up?

      “Standard journalistic practice” is to get the facts right and with proper attribution.

      There are many highly dubious presumptions and insinuations in your comment.

      • Myra

        Then how did the YPD show up Sherlock? Did they just manifest because they felt a disturbance in the atmosphere? GTFOH

    • Im not Izobel Stevens

      Save you the click. Her name’s Sarah Braasch.

      • Mary Ann

        It’s disgraceful that the YDN has allowed this reporting student’s name to appear here. This is a clear effort to encourage harassment of that student.

        SHAME!

        • (((PirateCafe))) 25/*45

          Bigots and racists should ALL be named so the rest of society can shun them.

          • Mary Ann

            Actually, you seem to have something a lot more violent and hateful in mind than “shunning.”

          • oldgrad

            The comment literally only said “shun”, so I don’t see any evidence the poster had anything more in mind.

            Why do you constantly project intentions onto all the posters here, but insist it’s unwarranted to try to infer Braasch’s motives?

          • td2016

            And you will volunteer to identify the “racists and bigots!” As you have done here without hearing a word from Ms Braasch! Yes, indeed. Nothing sinister about you. O no, no, no. Nothing sinister about you.

    • patrickinchicago1

      Agreed. Why is the offending caller not identified by name?

  • Higherominous Bosh

    So… this “neighbor” wasn’t right neighborly… As a statistical matter, I’d be interested in the “neighbor’s” background; why was this “neighbor”:
    – unable to identify a fellow/sister neighbor
    – unable to identify a fellow/sister graduate student
    – assuming the negative over the positive potential
    – unempowered to “confront” the situation xeself
    – “empowered” to deman’ “Da Man”?
    [As an aside: note the institutional “cultural privilege” of bad spelling.]

    As noted, I’d be interested in country of origin, background culture and field of study, just for the data.

    Sorry this happened to Siyonbola; let us hope she can put it behind her and not let it (further) “color” her graduate experience.

  • Higherominous Bosh

    Follow up: Gads! At grad skool, no less! Does the neighbor not read the News?

    Facial expressions transmit (to me, anyway) smarmy self-satisfaction. Maybe just a standard-issue self-centered busybody? Siyonbola’s observation that the neighbor “should be committed” is not without merit. The neighbor has some entitlement or holier-than-thou rule-follower issues (would be interesting to see whether she has filed other, more general complaints — I think likely — or whether, indeed, she has some sort of cultural bias going on.)

    Kudos to Syinbola for her calmness and steadfastness (also, a very pleasant voice, unlike the other character in the video, IMO).

    The cops, sadly, were indeed “just doin’ their job.

    Personal anecdote: On my very first day at Yale I fell asleep in Beinecke only to be awoken, told “sleeping is not allowed here” and shooed along. Of course, one might well question the underlying reasons for a “no sleeping” policy… (New Haven Public Library is often FULL of nappers.)

    • Nancy Morris

      Siyonbola’s generally calm demeanor is laudable, but she should have immediately proffered her ID. And while I sympathize with her annoyance, her observation that the neighbor “should be committed” was not warranted or helpful.

      This is not a story.

      • Dadler

        Only not a story if you are white,
        and if bias/prejudice has atrophied whatever critical thinking skills you may have at one time possessed. Your inability to recognize the obvious is a big part of this ongoing problem.

        • Mary Ann

          The YPD acted perfectly to the extent reported.

          There is no evidence of racism in this incident. That the women were of different races is not evidence of racial motivation.

          On the other hand, since you have no knowledge of Nancy’s race, your claim that she is white is bizarre, naked racism.

          Your comment is generally foul.

      • Ken P

        Yes, go on and blame the victim.

        • Mary Ann

          There is no victim. There is someone who had to wait 15 minutes for a security check delayed by a typo.

        • Nancy Morris

          There is no “victim.” And the fact is that Siyonbola’s security check was delayed mostly because she had put her nick name on her Yale ID. You can fulminate as much as you like, but it will not change those facts.

  • Macbill

    She got caught napping while Black; apparently an offense at Yale.

    • Nancy Morris

      Nobody accused her of “an offense.” She was asked for her Yale ID, which is entirely normal and appropriate. And the YPD handled the situation perfectly as far as this article and the linked “raw story” report recount the facts.

      • Myra

        Nancy, did you go to Yale? I hope not, because your comments are devaluing my degree if you did. You could not be so OBTUSE as to say no one accused her of an OFFENSE! If the police are called– and they come– then someone is accusing her of a crime. I was at Yale for 3 years in grad school, never ONCE was I asked for my ID. Stop trying to excuse this behavior. The student who called should be held accountable for wasting the time of the YPD, and the YPD should train their officers to know how to read a God Damn Yale ID. You sound like the ignorant idiot racist you obviously are. Maybe you’re the girl from the video? Fool.

      • Ken P

        It’s not appropriate. There’s always an assumption of guilt involving Black people and that’s the problem. Police should never have been called. The caller knew she was a student and only wanted to harass her. Making excuses for snowflakes high of privilege doesn’t change this fact.

        • Nancy Morris

          “There’s always an assumption of guilt.” Ah, proof by assumption and tautology. Sure beats having to look into the facts and circumstances.

          • The14th

            Do you call the cops when you don’t have a reason to assume some sort of crime?

          • Nancy Morris

            “Hello, YPD? I just heard a funny sound outside my residential college window. Can you send someone over to check it out? I think it might be a trapped cat.”

            Does that answer your question?

          • The14th

            That’s animal abuse, a possible crime. And to be clear I meant calling the cops on another person.

          • Nancy Morris

            You seem not to have noticed that you have competely run out of ideas. In any event, there’s nothing that invites a substantive response here.

          • The14th

            Sweet cop out, can’t respond to me so you’re just gonna pretend I didn’t ask a real question.

          • Nancy Morris

            Students commonly call YPD to request security checks of unfamiliar persons on Yale property. For that matter, they commonly call about things like “strange noises.”

            You are way, way, way off track.

          • The14th

            Really? The YPD must be damn busy if it’s common for them to be summoned the second somebody sees a stranger. In my college dorms people were crashed out on couches and chairs at all hours, and I never saw the cops called once (except when a guy passed out in the hall ‘cus he was way too drunk).

          • Nancy Morris

            And your point is?

          • The14th

            Really, I gotta explain that? My point is that based on personal experience I HIGHLY doubt that Yale students are commonly calling the YPD out every time they don’t recognize somebody on campus, you are simply attempting to normalize this incident in lieu of coming up with a satisfactory explanation for the caller’s behavior.

    • hochiming

      Let’s not color up this topic by suggesting that racism still exists in white America. It’s all a leftist liberal lie by commie Americans .. just ask Hannity, Levine or Michael Savage.

      • (((PirateCafe))) 25/*45

        Or Justice John Roberts.

  • Nancy Morris

    Why doesn’t this article explain whether this grad student was carrying her Yale ID? People found in Yale buildings are routinely asked by the YPD to show their Yale ID, regardless of race. Producing one’s ID card normally ends the check. So the circumstances reported in this article SUGGEST, but don’t DEMONSTRATE, that this student didn’t have Yale ID, leaving her vulnerable to a typo. Are we supposed to believe that someone named “Siyonbola” has not had her name misspelled before? Please.

    So this story SEEMS to amount to a grad student napping in circumstances that warranted YPD asking for ID, which she didn’t have, leading to a records check that was delayed for a few minutes by a typical misspelling that she has encountered many times. Siyonbula MAY have accused the police of harassing her, which accusation was entirely uncalled for. The YPD response and action were exemplary.

    All in all: Big deal.

    Talk about grandstanding self importance and unjustified claims of persecution. Dean Cooley should not have been so accommodating.

    And what Yale grad student actually pays tuition? If she really said that the YPD officer was entitled to be suspicious.

    The reporting student seems oversensitive regarding her own security, but Siyonbola seems oversensitive to her suspicions of racial persecution.

    This is not a story.

    • Ember Rayne

      So first, she should not expect one of the best schools in the country to spell her name correctly. She is a second class student and should expect this.

      Then, despite YES having her ID, (only hers was checked, not the white student’s) she should expect to have that ID run and verified to satisfy a random white student that she paid tuition.

      What if every white student felt the need for daily checks?

      She is at one of the most difficult schools in the country.
      She can’t take a nap?

      No. We will not be harrassed. Stop expecting it.

      (The fact that you bent over backwards to produce a way to make this her fault is indicative of EXACTLY the problem.
      She HAD her ID.
      She CERTAINLY did not spell her OWN name wrong.
      She is an ENROLLED STUDENT.

      Yet… here you are. Telling her she deserves harrassment and that for not suffering it silently, she is in the wrong. The concept that black people should accept bigotry is unacceptable.)

      • Nancy Morris

        That there was a typo in this grad student’s name is not evidence of bigotry or anything but that fact that people writing other people’s names often misspell them. Do you want to go down to the Registrar’s office and scream at some clerk who made the mistake, who is probably someone from the local New Haven neighborhood. The quip about Yale being “one of the best schools” is obviously ridiculous.

        The video: She did not proffer her ID immediately and specifically says she might not proffer it at all. She eventually does. The typo in the confirming records, causing a delay of a few minutes. Big deal. There was no harassment by the YPD officers.

        There is no evidence bigotry. Everything you write is wrong.

        Peace.

    • http://www.vhmckenzie.com VH McKenzie

      If you took the time to watch the videos you will see that she had her ID and gave it to the officers. I think the officers should also have asked for the ID of the woman who called in the complaint.

      • Nancy Morris

        If you took the time to read my comments you would know that the article doesn’t link to the video, which was added later in a comment, and that I address all of what you bring up.

        Lazy clown.

    • RalphEllison

      The White woman is a massive douche for sure, but you are right about the i.d. part. Just because the grad student opened the door doesn’t mean anything. The cops don’t know if she was a theft or something.

      Also, did they check the crazed White girls i.d.??

      • Nancy Morris

        Nobody complained about the complainer.

    • bessann28

      Are you kidding me? I paid full tuition as a grad student and have the student loans to prove it.

      This student was in her OWN BUILDING. Why would she have to show ID to be in the common area? That is complete nonsense.

      • Nancy Morris

        It is standard protocol for YPD to ask for Yale ID. Claims otherwise are wrong.

        • bessann28

          Then why didn’t the woman who called the police have to show her ID?

          • Mary Ann

            Nobody is reported to have requested a security check of her.

          • oldgrad

            They should now. Daily.

          • Mary Ann

            No such report. More evidence of how bitter and out of touch with reality you are.

          • oldgrad

            More evidence that you didn’t understand my comment.

          • Nancy Morris

            Probably because nobody called to ask for a security check on her.

          • Nancy Morris

            The YPD report clearly states that she met the YPD officers at the HGS doors and showed them her Yale ID.

            Why do you spew hateful rants without informing yourself of even the most basic facts of the case?

      • Mary Ann

        Almost no Yale grad student pays tuition. Your effort to insinuate or otherwise is laughable.

        Some PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL students pay tuition. But not grad students.

        From your comment I wonder if you have or have ever had any connection to Yale.

        • oldgrad

          All professional school students pay tuition; they are by far the majority of grad students (Med, Law, SOM).
          Masters students in GSAS also pay tuition. You clearly know nothing about Yale grad school, but feel entitled to post dozens of comments on this story.

    • Yale09er

      You really dont deserve a response since you are have your mind already set but… she produced her Yale ID and was still kept by police for over 15 min. She was also standing next to her door and opened the locked door with her key to show that this was indeed her apartment.

      • Nancy Morris

        Except the YDN article doesn’t say any of that, clown.

      • Mary Ann

        So if your neighbor calls the police to report that he thinks your house is being burglarized, the police should just go away if someone comes to the door and says he lives there, no further questions asked? NobID requested?

        What planet are you from?

        Of course YPD protocol requiring the officer to ask for Yale ID is proper. That IS the protocol and it is the CORRECT protocol.

        • HansC

          The complainant didn’t call the police to report a crime. She called to report a *fellow student* sleeping in a common area.

          Why should the Yale police take a call like that at all seriously?

          • Mary Ann

            The YPD encourages students to call in for security checks of a wide range. They take such requests very seriously. It not at all necessary that a caller believe that a crime is being committed.

            The commenters here insisting otherwise are ignorant twits, since this fact is easily checked and has been pointed out repeatedly by me and others.

    • Alyson Lloyd

      RACIST ALERT!

      • Nancy Morris

        YES, YOU ARE A RACIST!

        RACIST! RACIST! RACIST!

        RACIST ALERT!

        Clown.

      • Mary Ann

        JERK ALERT!

    • Alex Lew

      She was carrying her Yale ID. Turns out, the YPD thought that the date of issue (at the bottom of all Yale IDs) was an expiration date, which made them suspicious. If these checks are so “routine,” you’d think they’d know this detail.

      You say that “producing one’s ID card normally ends the check.” I don’t know if that’s true, but in this case, they asked to take the ID card out and call it into security. Rather than search by the UPI (the identifier at the bottom of all Yale IDs), they spelled her name over the phone.

      Before all of this, she also opened the door to her Yale apartment with her key, in front of the cops. This apparently didn’t convince them that she lived in the building.

      I spent four years at Yale and was never once asked by security to show my ID (except at entrances to libraries with ID scanners). I have no idea whether such checks happen “routinely” (and neither do you); my guess would be it happens more often to some students than others.

      Also: the article clearly spells out that a white classmate called the cops on her. That’s not a routine ID check.

      • Nancy Morris

        Normal protocol is to ask for ID. The rest of your reply is wrong.

        • Alex Lew

          Hm. Thanks for replying… but which part is wrong? She did have her Yale ID, and gave it to them. The police did take the date of issue to be a date of expiration, which added to their confusion. All of this is clearly visible / audible in the video she posted.

    • Juan Diaz

      It would be one thing if the Yale police had entered the common room and asked everyone for their ID, but a fellow student called the police on her and she was singled out unecessarily (falling asleep in the common room is hardly criminal behavior).

      • Mary Ann

        As the officer in the video clearly explains, YPD asks for Yale ID from people in Yale buildings for whom a security check has been requested. They do not and should not make the kind of blunderbuss demands for ID your naive comment suggests.

        Nor is it necessary that there be “criminal behavior” to warrant a security check. Nobody accused Siyandola of “criminal behavior.” The reporting student may have been oversensitive.

        Your comment is loaded with bizarre misconceptions.

    • Carl R

      …Nancy, maybe watch the video, she produced ID immediately and they detained her for 15 minutes.

      • Nancy Morris

        First, the video was added later in a comment, not in the article. And she did NOT only did produce her ID immediately, she specifically states that she is delaying while she considers not producing it at all.

        You need to watch the video again.

      • Mary Ann

        The check was delayed for a few minutes by a typo. Your attempt to read something malicious into this on the part of the YPD is laughable. And stupid.

    • brooklynette

      Maybe she’s the one who called the cops…

    • type_b

      I watched the video. Not only did Siyonbola produce her ID card within the first minute of the interaction (after an initial refusal), it seems that the officer did not even know the date printed on the bottom right corner of the ID card is the date of issue of the card, confusing it with an expiration date. Shows how often “people found in Yale buildings are routinely asked by the YPD to show their Yale ID.”

      Goes to show how one’s biases and assumptions lead to erroneous conclusions.

      • Nancy Morris

        All efforts to claim that people found in Yale buildings are not routinely asked by the YPD to show their Yale ID are mistaken. It is normal procedure.

    • yay4paine

      The article didn’t need to explain whether or not the grad student was carrying her Yale ID, because she clearly hands it to the police in the video, you doofus.

      • Nancy Morris

        Hey, doofus, the article doesn’t link to the video. That was added in a later comment.

        Clown.

    • Yale 2006

      I spent four years on campus at Yale and was never asked to produce my ID.

      She produced her ID and yet that did not end the harassment she endured.

      “A grad student napping in circumstances that warrant YPD”— what circumstances would those be? A grad student asleep in front of a laptop. Did she have an AR-15 on her lap? To whom was she a threat?? She was ASLEEP.

      Nancy, next time you decide to call the police on someone in your building because you don’t like the color of their skin, snap out of it. No matter what sheltered life you’ve led, if you want to participate in a diverse and academic environment, it is incumbent on you to get over your racism and white supremacy that led you to call the police on black people simply because they are black. You do not have the right to wield 911/the YPD as your personal police force.

      And don’t forget to brush your hair. It’s 2018, you will be videotaped.

      Signed,
      Yale Class of 2006.

      • Nancy Morris

        You have your virtue signally cranked up to eleven. It is perfectly mormal and long established protocolnfor the YPD to ask people found in Yale buildings to show their ID. Your putative anecdotal experience is not evidence to the contrary. This woman was not “harassed” by the YPD at all.

        There is also no evidence in this article or the raw story videos that this reporting student was motivated by race. That is the unsupported conclusion of people citing to no evidence other than the racial difference between these two grad students, which is no evidence.

        Further, your insulting claim that I call the police because I don’t like the color of people’s skin is ignorant, disgusting and unsupported. You have accused another person of racism twice in one comment, each time with no evidence.

      • Mary Ann

        So, let’s recap: if a white Yale woman calls for a YPD security check of a young black man who is not a Yale student but is in the hall outside her room, Ms Siyandola says the responding YPD officers should refuse to do the security check if they decide they think the reporting woman is “crazy” and then Yale should eject her from her campus housing. Siyandola is recorded saying all of those things in her own video.

        And from your comment it appears that you might actually think that is how Yale has operated for years, since 2002 in fact.

        Have I got that right?

        Memo to Yale 2006: You are very wrong. You should have paid more attention during your four years in New Haven, where on February 18, 1991 – just eleven years before you arrived – Yale student and varsity lacrosse player Christian H. Prince, 19 years old, of Chevy Chase, Md., died of a single gunshot wound to the chest he received about 1:15 A.M. on Hillhouse Avenue.

    • jazzed

      If you watch the actual facebook video linked to this on rawstory, you will see that she did, in fact, hand over her ID within the first 3 minutes of dealing with officer AND after she had demonstrated that she had in her possession a working dorm room key. At this point, she was detained for another 12 minutes while the officers verify the veracity of her ID, an action which they did not appear to take with the student who had originally instigated the complaint.

      As for the student’s tuition, whether the tuition was paid by herself or on her behalf by scholarship or other fellowship, there was still tuition that was paid. So how is it unreasonable for her to expect to be accorded the respect of being a member of the institution which that tuition should entitle her?

      • Nancy Morris

        If you read my actual comments you would see that I address everything you bring up.

        If Yale pays one’s tuition one does not pay tuition. It is her claim that she has paid her own tuition that is wrong.

        I did not write that it was “unreasonable for her to be accorded respect.” Your twisting what I wrote in that way is unreasonable. And she WAS accorded respect by the YPD officers.

    • Jillisa Wood

      The young woman produced her ACTIVE Yale ID

      • Nancy Morris

        It doesn’t say that in the YDN article.

      • Mary Ann

        She delayed, and said so. The check was further delayed by a typo. So what?

        Efforts to make something significant out of this incident are foolish or malicious.

        There is no there there.

    • Craig Smith

      So what you’re saying is, this person should have had her ID and has a weird name? Essentially? What about the white person calling the cops? Anything to say about that? Please… grow a heart. Yours is nowhere to be seen in your comment.

      • Nancy Morris

        To infer a sinister intent from the mere fact of racial differences is not “heart,” it’s “hate.”

        There is no evidence race played a role here.

      • Mary Ann

        It’s clear that Nancy thinks the caller was oversensitive about her personal security. Nancy says that clearly. You ignore that, disingenuously. Obviously her “weird name” has resulted in it being misspelled many times.

        There is no evidence that the caller was motivated by racism. Those who impute racism from the difference in the races of the two women are themselves indulging in racist nonsense. And by the reports here and the video, the caller’s prior request for a security check on a young non-Yale man in the hall was not improper. Certainly to the extent of the reports here and in the video, the YPD officers acted entirely properly, and all those suggesting otherwise just disgrace themselves.

        So, let’s recap: if a white Yale woman calls for a YPD security check of a young black man who is not a Yale student but is in the hall outside her room, Ms Siyandola says the responding YPD officers should refuse to do the security check if they decide they think the reporting woman is “crazy” and then Yale should eject her from her campus housing. Siyandola is recorded saying all of those things in her own video.

        Have I got that right? And you agree?

    • misst127

      Read closer.. she has an ID… but her name was misspelled in the data base… the video shows it… she also used her keys to enter the apartment to show she lives there… smh…

      • Nancy Morris

        No, it doesn’t say she has an ID. That is in the video, not the YDN article.

        YOU need to read closer.

      • Mary Ann

        “Read closer?”

        The article does not say she had a Yale ID. You need to see either an opthomologist or a psychiatrist.

        Make the appointment today.

    • scb27

      You’ve missed the point which is that if the student was white, no one would have called the authorities at all and there still would not have been any incident, id or not. She was not randomly asked for id by a passing officer, her status was questions by a fellow student who racially profiled her.

      • DataSource

        But you are missing a point, also, which is that you are making an assumption when you state as fact that “if the student was white, no one would have called the authorities at all”, that she was racially profiled. There is no way that you can know that.

        The caller could have been justifiably prudent to call if she found ANYONE sleeping there at that time. The caller could have been someone with control issues, or safety issues. Apparently, the caller had called this woman in before, maybe it was a personal conflict, nothing to do with race.

        Maybe it could have been 100% about race…. but please don’t claim you know it was, when there is no way possible you can read the caller’s mind.

        Racial profiling is a very, very real problem, but it doesn’t get solved if we immediately cry “Racist!” on every incident, without knowing the facts. Let’s say you see someone doing something you legitimately think looks real, real suspicious… I mean actually dangerous to society suspicious (unlike this incident). Do you NOT call police if that person happens to be a different race than you? That’s what assuming “racist” can lead to.

        Don’t get me wrong. Profiling is beyond wrong, and it’s got to stop, and it may very well be what happened here. But we don’t know

      • Nancy Morris

        I didn’t miss any such point. That point is thrust forward everywhere in this article.

        And there is also no indication in this article that race played any roll. That is an assumption imposed by various people without evidence.

    • Slappy san

      Read it again, hoss.

      • Nancy Morris

        If you think this article explains whether this grad student was carrying her ID, you need to cut back on your microdosing, hoss.

        Clown.

    • How Bekah

      Go away

      • Nancy Morris

        Clown.

      • Mary Ann

        Drop dead.

    • Lorelai

      Watch the video. Her ID and keys to her campus apt weren’t enough.

      • Nancy Morris

        Read my other comments.

        The YDN article doesn’t link to the video. That was posted later.

        I have addressed the video in other comments.

    • voguesy

      YPD would not have gotten involved had they not been called by the other student. The white one. That’s what the problem is. Why didn’t the white girl go to the black girl and maybe ask if she’s OK and then engage her in conversation to ascertain if she needed to call the cops? Was the black girl clutching a kitchen knife that was dripping blood? Probably not.

      • Mary Ann

        They are not “girls.”

        But I agree with you apparent point that the reporting woman was perhaps oversensitive about her personal security. There are many women I regard as being like that. For example, it is common when one descends at night in an office building elevator that makes a stop on the way to have a young woman who was waiting for the elevator jump and gasp in fright when the doors open and she sees that it is occupied. Do such women expect private, unoccupied elevators for their exclusive use after hours?

        Such female psychologies are alien to me. But I do comprehend them, and they are generally not motivated by racism.

        • oldgrad

          Are you suggesting Braasch feared a sleeping female student would rape her in the elevator?

          • Mary Ann

            Do you spend a lot of time trying to come up with the stupidest, deliberately off track comment, topping your previous one each time? Or do they all come naturally?

    • Tapati McDaniels

      According to The Root: “Still, the police request her school identification card, which Siyonbola reluctantly gives. Because her name was entered incorrectly into a student database, it took more than 15 minutes to verify Siyonbola was a Yale student. ” The circumstance that caused her to have to prove to YPD that she was a student was the assumption of the white grad student that she wasn’t. Same student, according to Siyonbola, had called police previously on a friend for getting lost in the building. https://www.theroot.com/a-black-yale-student-took-a-nap-in-a-dorm-common-room-1825893057

    • KS

      An utterly useless post. Watch the video, she had the ID on her and produced it.

      • Mary Ann

        The video link was posted in a comment, not the article. Nancy is exactly right about that. And there’s lots of substance in this comment and others Nancy has made to this article.

        “Utterly useless?” Look to yourself.

        • KS

          “And there’s lots of substance ”
          Technically, hot air is a “substance” too. So you are right! Congratulations.
          Funny how she feels in her embarrassing rant to not point out how the student had the police Called on her by a girl who’s motives were incredibly suspect, to say the least (see the first video that was posted by her).

          • Mary Ann

            Apparently Nancy’s comments are so substantial that they have disturbed you but you have no coherent answer to them. She should count that as a win, if it matters.

          • KS

            I am just trolling the hicks, Darlin’. You on the other hand seem rather triggered.

          • oldgrad

            You’re always harping about facts and reasoning in your comments. But when people correct your errors, you resort to ad hominem attacks. Pathetic.

          • Mary Ann

            If you ever come up with a fact, reasoning or a correction I guess we’ll have something to check.

            Do drop an extra tab tonight. Go ahead. Treat yourself.

  • iamhe

    who called the cops…..? what is wrong with that “person”

    would they have called the cops if it was a white woman?

    We are seeing a lot of inappropriate stuff like this all around America, some kind of bigot “think” calls the cops on an innocent person…. could be a very dangerous thing to do….. the person who called the cops should be exposed.. because they and their “thinking” are the real culprit here.

  • MoeLarryAndJesus

    Let’s face it, the “neighbor” is just a trash bag filled with racist slime.

    Dismissed.

    • Mary Ann

      Any evidence or facts to go with that rant, sir?

      • MoeLarryAndJesus

        Yes. Just google “Sarah Braasch” and then go back to your tag-team with Gillian and the Professor.

        • Mary Ann

          If you care to ever make a coherent comment supported by even a single fact or line of reasoning, please din’t hesitate to write.

          • MoeLarryAndJesus

            Why would I waste my time arguing seriously with a useless nitwit like you? You have a grand sense of entitlement just like your fellow mental case, Sarah Braasch.

  • (((PirateCafe))) 25/*45

    If this is the second time the student had campus police called on her, from the same white student, it appears this is little more than swatting and the caller (student who called campus police) should be booted off campus.

  • peemster

    The YPD are clearly dragging their feet to make some point about their power. They look at a date on the ID and “assume” (in the cop’s words) that it is an expiration date, and make that into a larger deal. They just don’t like her refusal to cow to them. Jerks.

    • Mary Ann

      That is dead wrong. This is yet another strained effort to argue that the correct YPD protocol is not (or should not be) to ask any unfamiliar person in Yale building for whom a security check is requested for Yale ID.

      It is the YPD protocol, as the officer in the video explains. And it is the correct protocol.

  • Chimfish

    The video shows the officers continually insisting that the student show them her ID even after she proved that she lives in the building by using her key to open the door to her apartment.

    One common theme to these videos is cops placing the burden of proof on black people to prove their innocence, despite not having any evidence that a crime occurred. “We don’t know who you are” isn’t reasonable suspicion of a crime.

    • (((PirateCafe))) 25/*45

      Sort of a “papers please” if one’s skin tone is not the correct one. I would have never thought that could happen at Yale. Makes me glad I’m not Yale material.

      • mellow_johnny01

        Makes me glad I’m not Yale material.

        Makes me glad I’m white!

        (And I say that w/o a hint of racism or malice. Rather, I understand now that, when interacting with police (especially white police), other white people like me don’t get systemically messed around with like happens to colored folks. I’ve developed such empathy for them and yet realize that I can’t even understand the strain of having to (credibly!) worry about being shot by police – or simply humiliated by them because of my skin color.)

        How RUDE to wake someone up who’s taking a nap, btw! THAT should be a crime – or at least a code of conduct violation! Sheesh.

    • nimh

      Thank you – best response here. Succinctly identifies what went wrong here and what the bigger problem at the heart of this is.

    • Mary Ann

      This is yet another strained effort to argue that the correct YPD protocol is not (or should not be) to ask any unfamiliar person in Yale building for whom a security check is requested for Yale ID.

      It is the YPD protocol, as the officer in the video explains. And it is the correct protocol.

  • xanxibar

    Here’s an idea: if cops receive a call from a racist complaining about someone sleeping in the common area, they should arrest the caller for making a false complaint.

    • Mary Ann

      Right. And they should make the determination that the caller is a “racist” on the spot based on the difference in the races of the two people alone.

      Yeah, that would show ‘em.

  • DooleyWilson2042✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ

    white people are always embarrassing themselves

    especially the Trump voters, but whites in general

    • Spencer Graham-Thille

      I feel like this issue is independent of whom people voted for for president.

    • Mary Ann

      This comment is naked racism.

    • westwoodwizard

      Your are naive. Nobody will mistaken Yale for a bastion of white conservative Republicans. Yale is a traditional white liberal school. It is hilarious to see the spin put on by liberals that white conservatives are racists while the white liberals are not, The liberal vs conservative label has to do with the differences in social, cultural, and political beliefs within the white Christian American population. When it comes to being racist, white liberals are more racists than white conservatives. Starbucks is a white liberal establishment from white liberal Seattle..who called the police on those two black men again? Who called the police in this incident at Yale? A white liberal female…Do not kid yourself that white liberals are not racists…

  • Paul Belliveau

    Did the police first ask the white complainant to verify that she herself belonged in the library before they “just did their jobs?”

  • Eliza

    This isn’t a good enough response. The white student needs to be reprimanded. This is her second time calling the police on black students in the building. She is harassing fellow students.

  • Richard Presutti

    Where do you see that she was calm? She reacted, as they all seem to do, with anger. Maybe chill out and people will not get scared of you at every turn. Also, who sleeps in public like that? Oh wait, she and her kind do….

    • SudsMaster

      Lowlife alert. ^^^

    • retired law prof

      what KIND is that?

    • Tomas Nordberg

      This is a racist comment.

    • Dadler

      I’m white with blood siblings who are black. You have no idea what it is to be black in America. Zero. But you yap and yap with such conviction. Your “they” and “her kind” comments were quite revealing, obviously. Why not just say you are a proud racist and hate people of color? Own it.

      • Lauren Bertrand

        It’s wonderful that they have AntiFA sympathizers (nearly always white) to flex their muscles on behalf of those “marginalized” people. Clearly “people of color” are little more than helpless lemmings, who would shrivel and die if it weren’t for you…so it’s great for you to look out in their interest, since you know EXACTLY how they all think. It must be amazing being gifted with a keen insight that we mere plebeians can never expect to have. You are much, much, MUCH better than me.

    • WeeFree ✓

      Racist scum.

    • KS

      Never been to a Yale common area have you hick? (that was a joke; if you passed high school, I’d be impressed!). Its not “public”. Students do that all the time. Now get back to your goats.

    • DataSource

      Who is this “they” you speak of? “Her kind”?????????
      Please tell me you’re trolling

    • well now

      Racist

    • (((PirateCafe))) 25/*45

      ‘Also, who sleeps in public like that? Oh wait, she and her kind do….’

      And someone up-voted this bigoted comment. Color me surprised.

    • Jake Stevens

      “they”?

    • Terry Ramsey Haskins

      “her kind do”? surely you mean Yale graduate students…..or college students in general.

  • Pennywise

    I’m just impressed that Miss Siyonbola can sleep AND write a paper at the same time. Seems like it’d be done by now instead of two days late but maybe it’s hard to get comfortable with that chip on her shoulder.

    As for the other young lady, she needs some serious meds. I don’t know what kind of meds she can get get to smack the self-righteousness out of her brain but she’d better get it under control before she wakes up the wrong person.

    Law enforcement has my sympathy here. They should carry Snickers™.

  • Anastasia

    The video should have been posted!!

  • Juan Diaz

    I saw the video of the two students involved, and I must say that the student who called 911 seems afraid of her own shadow. The student who was sleeping in the common room looks like someone who belongs at Yale and is a Yale student. I would never in a million years think of calling 911 if I saw her sleeping in the common room. She hardly seems homeless or a menace to anyone, so why call 911?

    Yale really needs to address racism on campus. This has to stop! It would be one thing if she had identified the student and then spoken to the dean about her habit of sleeping in the common room (if that is indeed the case), but to call 911?!!! I fell asleep at the library at Yale many times, and no one ever called 911 on me. I really would have been SHOCKED if the police had arrived and asked me for my Yale ID.

    • mellow_johnny01

      I would never in a million years think of calling 911 if I saw her sleeping in the common room. She hardly seems homeless or a menace to anyone, so why call 911?

      Exactly. Like…how big of a namby-pamby do you have to be to call the police on a fellow student for taking a nap? If you’re that concerned (and I would never do this, mind you … the person is napping b/c they’re tired and it’s such a jerk move to wake them up!), then nut-up and wake them up yourself under the pretense of checking to make sure that they’re “OK” and ask if they need “assistance” getting back to their room (which invites them to reveal where in the building they live (if they live in the building), which should allay your irrational, racism-related, unsubstantiated fears :eye-roll:

    • Lauren Bertrand

      Sure, Yale needs to do something to police the thoughts of its hopelessly racist student body. The question is: how many more deanlets of Inclusion and Equity can a single school hire?

  • voguesy

    What about the white student who called the cops? Did you try to interview her? I’d love to know what about a woman sleeping inside a dorm building made her so nervous that she had to call the cops. And maybe you could put the white student in touch with the white woman who called the cops at Colorado State on two Native American teenagers who were on the same campus tour as she was and worried her because they were so quiet. I’d love to go on a tour with quiet people. It would allow me to hear what the tour guide is saying over the constant buzz of some white people’s brains trying, but failing, to engage.

  • Bunyflufy

    Yale – nice way to back up your racist student – she should be expelled for LYING to the police. I know you’ll do nothing as all bigots get off without any punishment. That is the way it goes in TRUMPS alt white ‘Merica,

    • chesler

      What was the lie?

  • Jules Dupont

    Disgusting! Anyone who knows the 911 caller needs to go up to her and fill her with shame. She severely crossed the line. No excuses. No justification. No common sense.

  • Hubert_the_Infant

    Does anybody at Yale have any idea how embarrassing it is to be an alumnus these days? If it isn’t snowflakes finding racism and sexism everywhere or celebrated alumnus John Kerry of the in-your-face Kerry Initiative violating the Logan Act, it is real racism such as this. Get a grip people.

    • mellow_johnny01

      Dunking on the SJWs AND the actual loathsome racists…I respect you.

  • Anna H. (Anima Mundi)

    Congratulations, Yale! You are now officially more racist than Duke University was in 1982. That’s quite an achievement for a Northern university, 36 years on.

    • John Dingle Barry

      Another drama queen heard from.

  • Thomas Dylan

    the yale news does know this is a scam right? don’t you think you should have followed up on the “white” woman caller?

    • https://twitter.com/virgoascending Andrew

      They did

    • john publico

      And your information came from what source? Alex Jones? Brietbart?

  • marymig

    Shame on Yale

  • Milton Hare

    In the struggle for justice, the only reward is the opportunity to be in the struggle. Frederick Douglass

  • Antnys

    Ms. Siyonbola is justifiably frustrated; it comes out in her voice and I feel for her. And although to her credit she kept her composure remarkably calm throughout, I think she did come across a bit rude and entitled when talking with police. New Haven CT has been ranked by the FBI as the nation’s 4th most dangerous city (CBS News) and consistently appears on lists of the most dangerous. There is a reason Yale is locked down like Fort Knox and students are warned about crime and need ID everywhere. There is also a reason, therefore, why police follow protocol and take the necessary precautions in one of the nation’s most dangerous cities. The onus is on Yale to clearly outline student safety guidelines, and ensure students both abide by them when raising alarm, and respect them when being asked to identify themselves.

    • derechos

      The onus is also on Yale for incorrectly spelling her name in the database, thus exacerbating the difficulty in identifying Ms. Siyonbola. Entries into the database should be reviewed by the students them selves, to assure accuracy.

      • Mary Ann

        Yes, just imagine the responsibility of the clerk who entered that name! If she got it wrong … even by a single letter … a Yale student MIGHT BE INCONVENIENCED FOR TEN OR FIFTEEN MINUTES. O my God! No doubt that clerk returns to his or her New Haven home every night exhausted at shouldering such responsibility.

        And why don’t the English department faculty check the spelling of every grad student’s name?

        O the humanity!

        By the way, what planet are you from?

    • R.E.A.L Human Rights

      People not familiar with the very serious crime problems at Yale University will not be able to fully appreciate your comments. But I have seen this first hand, and in fact, my car was attacked and smashed will attending a human rights event at Yale. There is a considerable criminal problem there, and as you write, there is a reason why Yale is the way it is today.

    • dingbat

      > I think she did come across a bit rude and entitled

      She was entitled to be where she was. Perhaps you were expecting a ‘yes, massa, attitude of deference?

      • Gregory

        She paid tuition at Yale. Seems like she is entitled to be at Yale. Where did you go to school. It is extremely common for students to doze off while working. I guess you didn’t ever see that while you were in school if any.

        • dingbat

          You hit reply to the wrong person. Maybe you meant to reply to Antnys higher up in the thread.

      • Mary Ann

        The police here acted completely correctly.

        The reporting student may have been oversensitive regarding her own personal security, but perhaps she was reacting to a young man brandishing a gun on two Timothy Dwight women in their own room a couple of weeks back.

        Everything in your comment is rank excess.

        • Martha Smith

          “perhaps she was reacting to a young man brandishing a gun” Except that the student she complained about was not brandishing a gun, but rather sleeping. It’s possible that the reporting student was overreacting (vs reacting) to a crime a couple of weeks back, but she still needs to take a long look in the mirror.

          • Mary Ann

            Please, nobody could be as stupid as what you affect in your comment .

            If you can’t grasp that a gunpoint breaking two blocks away might put a highstrung woman on edge, you lack intelligence or empathy, or you just hate women.

          • Kevin

            Right, you’re so very intelligent. Every robber will ask for directions in public so you can remember his/her face, instead of simply robbing you at the place. Every robber will also sleep in a public area instead of looking for suitable targets and getting the hell out of there. Such extraordinary findings. Are you going to tell us next that 90 percent of rape and sexual assault cases are committed by male strangers, and that most school shootings are committed by black people?

    • Ken P

      You admit she was frustrated and had every right to be but then criticize her for being rude or entitled? Come on, man. Put yourself in her shoes. Maybe having the police called on your for dozing off while studying would never happen to you, but just try. She *IS* entitled to doze off while studying and not have law enforcement waste her time. She took an annoyed tone with the police like anyone would. What was she supposed to do, put on a minstrel show for them?

  • http://stonesnbones.blogspot.com/ Dr. GS Hurd

    I am retired faculty and was brought to Yale to clean up the occasional problem. This was in the 1980s for freak’s sake.

    ID the racist, and drop her.

    Or;

    if there is a major donor, Mafia family, or faculty brat involved, the Yale solution was to give her a degree.

  • Cullen Kehoe

    Sorry Yale, this is really stupid.

  • Alieninthissociety

    I can’t imagine what it could possibly be like to be so insular that you’re fearful and skeptical of everyone looks different from what you’re accustomed.

    • Mary Ann

      There is zero reported evidence that anything in your comment remotely describes this situation.

  • ArnieTracey

    Yale nor the officers are the issue. Nor is sleeping in a common area anything more than a pretext. The problem is a disturbed woman, filled to the brim with race-hate. And she is not the only such on campus. Yale needs to hold weekly open therapy-group meetings. They might want to call it. . . Hate Club.

    • Sol G

      You have zero evidence to support any of that. The hate is coming from you.

    • Lauren Bertrand

      The first places in the world I think of when I think of “race-hate”: Philadelphia Mississippi in the early 1960s, the slums of Mumbai in the late 1970s before Gandhi (Indira) came to power, Apartheid South Africa in the early 1980s, and Yale University in 2018. I’m sure most students at Yale keep white sheets in their bottom dresser drawer.

  • spencer60

    Listen, if she wants to sleep then she should sleep in her dorm. A common room is open to everyone, and someone taking it over as their personal bedroom is both rude and against the rules.

    The other thing to remember is Yale is in the heart of a slum area. Finding homeless people camped out in university buildings is not an uncommon occurrence.

    The student was absolutely right to call the cops, and the cops seem to have handled this very professionally.

    There was no reason for this woman to get her black-entitlement up in a snoot.

    • ElanorRose

      Have you ever been to a college? We literally fall asleep all over the place. Yesterday I was in the library asleep a girl had set up camp with a blanket and pillow. It’s finals time.

      Also your last sentence is so rude, it’s well documented that black students are more often seen as not belonging even when they’re doing nothing suspicious. Also “entitlement?” She was in a campus study area. She is completely entitled to be there.

    • Talor I.

      I understand your point as to the location of the University. But I wonder if she would have seen a young white man or woman sleeping in the common area, would she have felt the need to call police? or do only black people look homeless to you…?

    • rosena

      As a Yale alum and current New Haven resident, it is the idea that “Yale is in the heart of a slum area” that is questionable and indicates, at the least, a fear of others and a too sheltered life. New Haven is a working class town and has been since 1900. Years ago Yale students were afraid of the Italians here, then the Black population, and now the Hispanic, as each successively came here to work. There is poverty, but poverty does not turn New Haven into a slum. Young people really need to get a grip.

      • Sol G

        Actually, it goes back further. In the middle of the 19th century it was the Irish. In fact the moats around many Yale buildings are largely attributable to a very nasty Saint Patrick’s Day incident.

    • Teri

      Ever fall asleep when you are studying or reading? When you live in a dorm room, and your roommate wants to sleep, you often end up going out into the common area so you don’t disturb them. The first person to call is the RA, and then they call the police if needed. Sounds like a need for some resident training.

  • Donh

    Wow, stupid people at Yale? Who knew?

  • John Dingle Barry

    Not 2 weeks ago there was a black man with a gun inside a dorm room committing a burglary at the University. By all means, all you self righteous know it alls, don’t call the Police if you see something or someone you think is suspicious. Maybe if Yale students weren’t constantly being robbed, assaulted and harassed by the natives of New Haven, they wouldn’t be so nervous.

    • Dwayne Brain

      Did he also take a nap with his gun and stolen goods? Stop trying to draw parallels to completely different situations that ONLY have race in common. It literally makes you a racist.

    • Gregory

      You make racist assumptions. What do you mean suspicious? Black and sleeping? You know the caller does this to Black people. Any White people ever sleep in a common dorm room?

    • nutjob2

      So some other black person did something bad, so it’s ok to suspect all black people?

      That’s the very definition pf racial profiling, or simply racism.

  • Earthling

    Well if you’re gonna call the cops about someone in your building, it might be good to know who lives there. But once they show up, determining ID is an automatic priority. Possession of a key is inadequate & they would be fired for accepting it as such. Beyond that, a 12 min delay to confirm ID (due primarily to an administrative typo) hardly seems like a racist action.

    If a cop shows up and want to see my ID, I’m generally gonna comply right away – even at my own house. I have no way of knowing (in advance) who they’re looking for or why. I will not start with being indignant about their questions or debating their right to even be there.

    • meow

      There is a difference between racist and micro-aggression. Isn’t college comically known for having students fall asleep in open spaces? (e.g. libraries). Even if students aren’t allowed to sleep there, calling the cops is completely over the top. Cops should be called if you feel threatened or if a crime has been committed, like a burglary. This could have and should have been resolved between the two students. The white student should have just had a conversation with Siyonbola and that’s how that should have been resolved. Had I come upon a sleeping student, who had a key, who had ID, who had clearly been doing HW, I would have had empathy, not called the cops. Even if sleeping isn’t allowed in common areas, Siyonbola was not a threat nor was she bothering or hurting someone.
      Calling the cops may not have been racist, but it is a great example of the constant micro-aggressions that people of color face in America and make them feel unsafe and unwelcome.

  • Coinspring

    But what color were the cops?

  • qcp

    Thug police who apparently can’t even spell things correctly harassing students for simply existing. Shame!

    • Mary Ann

      Calling these police “thugs” is shameful. You disgrace yourself. And there was obviously no police harassment.

      “Can’t even spell.” You must be a failed comedian.

      • Second Responder

        “Mary Ann” – You are all over these comments, giving everybody a hard time.

        • Mary Ann

          No, not everyone. Only the haters. I detest mindless, group hate.

    • Sol G

      The current report is that there was no misspelling. Rather, she put her nick name on her official Yale ID, which caused the delay. Are you calling for “shame” on her for doing that?

  • joe fixer

    US has 13% African Americans and 64% whites.
    US Prisons has 40% African Americans, but only 39% whites.
    This statistic suggest an African American is 5.12 times as likely to commit a crime.
    Perhaps the white student over-reacted due to this statistic.

    • oldgrad

      Do you want to check your math again? Assuming those numbers are correct (roughly equal number of blacks and whites in prison), that would suggest that a random criminal is equally likely to be black as they are white.

      • Sol G

        Yes, but a random black is 5.12 times as likely to be a criminal, which is what matters.

  • aaronpeacock

    Shame on the person who called the police unjustifiably.
    Shame on the posters calling Siyonbola “entitled” when she IS, in fact, completely entitled.
    She was never instructed in any such protocol. The YPD were, and should be.
    There needs to be a manner for filtering police calls just like “swatting” incidents; some vetting of the conditions under which the police have been called. why were they called? the student should have notified a resident advisor (RA) and not escalated this to the police. It is also noted that this particular SAME STUDENT has called the cops on another black student! There needs to be some consequences for that sort of abuse of police services as some kind of racial weapon.

    • John Dingle Barry

      And the first time they “filter” a call and someone gets seriously injured or dies you’ll be there to back up the officers right?

      • KS

        I am impressed that hicks have now learned to type! Congratulations!

        • Miles to Code

          Your attitude suggests you’d be impressed by running water and indoor plumbing.

          • KS

            I understand that you are a tad piqued because you seem to think that I was insulting your people. But honestly, it was a compliment!

  • Ang Nihtgenga

    “Siyonbola’s name was not spelled correctly in a database of student information”
    Best stick with “King” or “Jackson”.

    • Sol G

      The problem is now reported to be that she put her nick name on her official Yale ID, which caused the delay. There was no misspelling.

  • s0nicfreak

    Is napping in the common room allowed? It’s often against the rules (and even the law, in some places) to sleep in public.

    • john publico

      The common room on a University campus isn’t “in public”. By that measure you could be told not to take a nap anywhere on the campus lawn.

      University policy might forbid it (I doubt any such policy exists at Yale), but otherwise there’s no law against it. And you can be certain that such a policy would be inconsistently enforced….making it ripe for legal action.

      • Sol G

        This case has nothing to do with how such a rule is enforced (if there is one). Rather, if there is such a rule and Ms Siyonbola was breaking it, then Ms Braasch was entitled to call YPD over the breach of the rule.

        • john publico

          Addressed in the first part of my response. Recap: It’s not a public space. And the likelihood that there is such a rule for common areas is low.

          Furthermore, there’s typically a chain of command to whom you can complain long before it becomes necessary to involve the campus PD. Braasch behaved like an entitled jacka5s.

        • john publico

          Addressed in the first part of my response. Recap: It’s not a public space. And the likelihood that there is such a rule for common areas is low.

          Furthermore, short of an emergency situation, there’s typically a chain of command to whom you can complain long before it becomes necessary to involve the campus PD. Those individuals can then determine if the issue needs to be escalated. Braasch behaved like an entitled princess.

    • Mary Ann

      The reporting student apparently thought napping in the common room is not permitted by the rules. That much has been reported.

      • KS

        Yeah napping in the common room is definitely a highly illegal offence warranting a call to the police instead of some Yale authorities. Especially if said offender is Black. The nice white lady just had a minor misunderstanding of the rules. Thank you for correcting all these idiots!
        On an unrelated matter, bought any artsy confederate flags lately?

        • Sol G

          The YPD are supposed to enforce Yale rules, not just Connecticut criminal laws.

      • RobertSF

        Yes, there’s probably a sign right below the sign that says, “No Food or Drink Please.” But calling the cops?

    • Sol G

      The YDN has been grossly incompetent in not reporting what the tule on napping in that “common room” actually is, as well as much else. While some commenters here insist that even if there is a rule against sleeping in that room, it doesn’t warrant calling the YPD. That is obviously wrong. Ms Braasch is not the enforcer of Yale rules, that’s the YPD’s job. And it is reported that the “common room” (which seems to actually be the living room of the only other suite on the 12th floor where Ms Braasch lives) is obviously material to her. In other words, if Ms Siyonbola was violating some rule by sleeping in that room, Ms Braasch probably had the right to call the YPD as she did. And in that case (if there is such a rule) if Yale takes action against her based on some conclusion that she should not have called the YPD, she may have a right of action to bring in Connecticut courts against Yale, Ms Siyonbola and perhaps others.

  • Mary Ann

    Have the commenters here critical of the YPD stopped to consider what Yale would be like if the YPD followed Ms Siyandola’s urging and made on the spot determinations that women requesting security checks are ”crazy,” and refuse to perform the requested security check on that basis? Such commenters are very foolish.

    It’s also worth noting that in the video Ms Siyandola suggests that Yale should have ejected this reporting student from her room because she had previously reported a young non-Yale man in the HGS hall. Have the overwrought commenters here … especially any who are women … given any thought to that argument?

    So, let’s recap: if a white Yale woman calls for a YPD security check of a young black man who is not a Yale student but is in the hall outside her room, Ms Siyandola says the responding YPD officers should refuse to do the security check if they decide they think the reporting woman is “crazy” and then Yale should eject her from her campus housing.

    Have I got that right?

    • Teri

      Yes. You are conflating two things that are not the same. The YPD cannot ignore a call from anyone for a security check. But perhaps the woman who reported it needs to question for herself why she thought it was a security threat.

      • Mary Ann

        The question is what the consequences of following Siyonbola’s demands would be. Those would be dreadful, and utterly destructive to women.

        You are totally off track and completely irresponsible.

        • RobertSF

          The question is what the consequences of following Siyonbola’s demands would be.

          A world with less racism?

          There’s a saying, “When you hear hoofbeats, think horses before you think zebras.” So you tell me. Exactly what is so frightening, so threatening about the sight of a young person sleeping in a school building — and not just any school, but one of the toniest schools in the nation, in which you are extremely unlikely to run into the riff-raff you’d see on the downtown city streets?

          Why would you think “terrorist, criminal, trespasser” instead of “oh, someone crunching for midterms is taking a nap?” Why would a criminal be napping instead of committing crime?

          • Sol G

            No. A world with hugely refuced security for women and no less racism than now. And given the extreme reactions and language of so many of the commenters here, it seems pretty clear that they would be routinely declared to be crazy by police responding to their calls, and then ignored. So there would be greatly recuced security for those commenters. That’s rather funny and ironic.

      • Miles to Code

        Maybe because if you don’t recognize someone sleeping outside your door it could be a security threat?

    • Yale09er

      Lets get it straight – the young man was a Yale grad student as well, he is Jean-Louis Reneson GRD ’19! Why do you assume he was not?? Check your own assumptions!

      • Mary Ann

        Actually, I made no such assumptions. Mr Reneson was not identified as a Yale student until this article. In the first article and the video he was described only as a “friend.” That is not a significant difference to these events. Ms Braasch appears to be rather high strung. I have been told she is a far-left feminist. Does any of that demonstrate that she is a racist? I don’t see it and I haven’t seen a hint if a coherent argument in these comments that anything reported her does.

        Your hate and prejudice are showing. It’s ugly.

        • Kevin

          Yeah like someone will just come out and say “I’m doing this because I’m racist!” That woman’s action says everything. Oh and you want evidence of racism? Take a look at her article and tell me it’s “far-left feminist” and not self-centered bigotry.

  • zensailor

    It seems a lot of this could have been avoided if some incompetent clown had entered her name correctly in the data base….there should be cross-checks to avoid this….the white student that initiated this deserves all of the ridicule that comes her way….she may possibly learn something as a result.

    • Progressives Progress

      victim blaming

    • Mary Ann

      O, yes, cross checking the spelling of grad student names. That’s a fine way to spend tuition dollars.

      By the way, what planet are you from?

      • DataSource

        Mary Ann, would you help a geezer out here?

        I’m wondering if you might accept a question as sincere, and offer me an explanation for for something I don’t understand. There is a dynamic (especially on internet comment threads) where people will often end a comment with a brief statement that mocks, insults, or derides the person they are addressing. It bothers the heck out of me (I judge it rude, off-putting, and counter productive to conversation) but it’s so common that I’m wondering if maybe I’m overly sensitive and/or out of sync with common language use.

        Usually when I’ve seen you do it here, it comes across as “Well, that’s so ridiculous an argument that I’m not even going give it weight by addressing it”, and that makes sense to me… especially cause you only do it in response to the weakest of arguments.

        But I’ve seen people do it even in pretty high level back and forth debates, “….. Quantum field theory obviously show that (blah-blah-blah)” and then they end with “If you weren’t stuck in remedial arithmetic, you’d understand that”.

        Any thoughts you can share? Is it accepted rhetoric now, everyone does it and no one takes it seriously or cares? Appropriate as a witty dismissal of trite comments, but wrong in response to reasoned comments? Etc., etc?

        This has been bugging the heck out of me, so if you’ve got some thoughts, I’d love to hear them. I’m specifically asking you, because sometimes you do it, sometimes not, so I’m thinking you might have some understanding of when it’s OK, when it’s not.

        Thanks.

        • Mary Ann

          No.

          • DataSource

            Thank you for your response. The fact that you won’t answer my question (especially since I phrased it without accusation) pretty much gives me the information I need.

            Which is that you (and people like you) have the social skills of a 7 year old, and get a kick from attempting to look superior.

            (See! I’m learning!)

          • Mary Ann

            I don’t care.

        • RobertSF

          I’m an old geezer too, having been online since 1988 (before retail internet). This is just how it is. The fact that nobody can punch someone in the nose leads people to be very rude.

          • DataSource

            Do you chalk it up totally to rudeness or personal issues in the writer who does that? Any chance that it’s become such a social norm, that it’s almost expected, or a rhetorical tic, and signifies nothing? Am I better to ignore it and consider the argument at face value, or dismiss the author as incapable of logical argument, given the ad hominem attacks?

            Your thoughts and advice?

          • RobertSF

            I think it’s become a social norm online at least, mostly because so much of online is about winning, not about exchanging information. I mostly ignore it. If someone is consistently insulting, I ignore them and don’t reply to them.

          • DataSource

            Really appreciate. “it’s about winning…” makes a ton of sense, and validated by the fact that I very, very seldom see comments such as “Gee, hadn’t thought of it that way” or “Good point, but have you considered this….?”

            So basically, I’m learning it’s a me problem, in that I have unrealistic expectations. Or better said, you’ve confirmed what I didn’t want to admit I already knew. Thanks, again.

            What a shame that such a useful communication and learning tool has devolved into something to be used for ego gratification and childish games. I guess I’ll have to stick with the NY Times comment section, where even the most vehement of disagreements (which I just had with another poster there) is discussed in such a way as to communicate and convince, rather than to “gotcha” win.

          • RobertSF

            Don’t despair. I’ve been watching Westworld, a reboot of the 1970s movie about a western theme park where visitors interacted with life-like robots in adventurous settings. That was the idea, but as someone says in one of the episodes, “the only reason anybody comes here is to live out fantasies of sex and murder,” which was true and which would be exactly what would happen if we had the technology to create a real Westworld. But average human nature wouldn’t keep someone who did want an adventure that wasn’t just based on sadistically killing robots from having one.

            It’s the same here. You can play the game the way you want to play it and leave others to their way. But don’t give up. Even in its current condition, the internet is better than no internet.

      • zensailor

        I think I just crash-landed on the Planet Of A**holes…..you must be their Queen.

        • Sol G

          It seems more likely that you’ve always lived on that Planet as its King.

    • Higherominous Bosh

      Unions. New Haven public schools…

    • Steve

      I personally don’t believe the story about her name being misspelled, They could of easily got her name (correctly spelled) from school files or even simpler just ask her for her student ID or any ID for that matter. I think that’s just the police officers going into damage control mode to cover up the fact that they were interrogating her with no just cause.

      • zensailor

        Interesting spin….makes sense.

        • Sol G

          Except it’s all wrong.

      • Sol G

    • Sol G

      Later reports are that her name was not misspelled. She put her nick name on her official Yale ID, which caused the delay. So I assume you conclude that a lot of this could have been avoided if she had put her real name on her Yale ID, and that the delay was her fault. Right?

  • Moonglowalso

    I probably would have woken her up to make sure she was okay. No threat perceived here.

    • Mary Ann

      Agreed. But that is zero evidence that her call for a security check was racially motivated. Do you think the caller might have been influenced by that guy who pulled the gun on the two TD women in their own room a couple of weeks ago?

      • The14th

        Unless that guy was deviously asleep in front of his laptop I don’t think so. And it sort of shows your bias that you linked this to a perceived threat of physical violence.

        • Mary Ann

          That you really can’t grasp how a high strung woman might be set on edge by a young male intruder impersonating a YPD officer pulling a gun on two women in their own Yale room a couple of blocks away indicates that you have either no heart and/or no head.

          But I’m going to be charitable towards you and instead assume you are a liar.

          • The14th

            You’re not understanding me. I was questioning how an armed individual posing as an authority figure to force himself into a dorm room has any similarity with a person napping on a couch in a common area posing no obvious threat. I see absolutely no connection without the assumption that certain races equal a threat.

            But I’m going to be charitable towards you and instead assume you didn’t bother to read my post.

  • Sum_Ting_Wong

    If Yales Founder, Elihu Yale, had discovered her he would have sold her as he was a slave trader

    • Mary Ann

      Elihu Yale was not a slave trader.

      • Mexoplex

        yes he was.

        • Mary Ann

          You are ignorant. He was the governor of Madras.

          • yet another guy

            His wikipedia page needs updating perhaps.

          • Sol G

            Wait! There are serious people who actually rely on Wikipedia for something like this? That’s alarming.

            There is more than one Yale web page that expressly states that Elihu Yale did not own slaves. He was governor of Madras, where slave trading took place, and worked for a company that traded slaves. He was not personally a slave trader and did not own slaves.

          • Lauren Bertrand

            Who cares if he did of not? What he was doing was completely within the standards of the time. If we hold past figures to the moral standards of the present, they will always lose. In due time, we’ll have to get rid of any recognition of Martin Luther King because he didn’t support LGBTTQQIA+ rights.

          • Sol G

            All excellent and entirely correct points!

          • Mexoplex

            you’re the ignorant one. Look it up.

          • Mary Ann

            OK, here is a recent Yale source:

            “We are fairly certain that Elihu Yale did not own any slaves himself…”

            https://yalecollege.yale.edu/open-conversation/yales-narrative-and-yours

            There are many ersatz sources on rhe internet making unsupported claims that Elihu Yale was a slave trader. This is a passage from one of my favorites:

            “[Yale] housed so many southern students that it briefly seceded from the Union at the start of the Civil War.”

            http://digitalhistories.yctl.org/2014/11/01/elihu-yale-was-a-slave-trader/

            Just wrap your mind around what kind of person it takes to write that sentence. “Yale housed so many southern students that it briefly seceded from the Union at the start of the Civil War.” Think about that sentence. Just think about it.

          • Mary Ann

            Here is another:

            “There is no direct evidence that Yale personally owned slaves … From 1687 to 1699, Yale served as governor of the East India Company’s settlement at Fort St. George, Madras (now Chennai). During that time, he oversaw the company’s slave trading activities…”

            http://collections.britishart.yale.edu/vufind/Record/1665331

      • Sum_Ting_Wong

        you are ignorantly misinformed

        • John Dingle Barry

          And you’re just plain ignorant.

        • Mary Ann

          Hey, fool, Elihu Yale was the governor of Madras.

          “Ignorantly misinformed?” Look to yourself!

          • The14th

            Where else do you think he got the slaves from? Oh yeah, Madras!

          • John Ferguson Cpd Moray

            He was Governor of Madras (Chennai) he was a slave trader and he was the benefactor to Yale

          • Mary Ann

            No, he was Governor of Madras. He was not a slave trader.

    • Dana Robertson

      WONG, IF YOU’RE SO OFFENDED, WHY DO YOU GO TO THAT SCHOOL?

  • Lett Lett

    The tragedy here is that the white student felt the need to call YPD in the first place.

    • Valérie Mitchelson

      Exactly!

  • Bob D.

    Ms. Braasch lives in a private room on the 12th floor of HGS tower. There is only one other dorm room on that floor, a suite with a common living room. The video of Ms. Siyonbola and the police was taken on the landing of the 5th floor of HGS tower, just outside Ms. Siyonbola’s room. At some point she says that she has to get back up to the 12th floor to continue studying/writing her paper. The African-American person whom Ms. Braasch called the police about in an earlier incident referred to getting back to “the base” on the 11th or 12th floor of HGS. The large common room of HGS is in another wing far from the tower. I wonder if the common room referred to in this story was actually the common living room of the suite opposite Ms. Braasch’s room on the 12th floor, which doesn’t explain how she could have accessed it to find Ms. Siyonbola asleep. Regardless, I’m scratching my head at Ms. Siyonbola’s reference to having to get back up to the 12th floor, where there is only Ms. Braasch’s room and a suite room.

    • Mexoplex

      “common room” damn anything else.

      • Bob D.

        Yes, but which “common room” are we talking about? The large common room in HGS is nowhere near where any of these videos were filmed. Did Braasch call the police from the large common room and then did Siyonbola follow her up to her room in the 12th floor of the tower? From the short video, Siyonbola apparently freely went down the elevator to the 5th floor, where she interacted with the police and where the long video was filmed. How did the police know to find her there? I’m not trying to side with either party. Why did Siyonbola wnat to return to the 12th floor to continue her studying writing? It sounds to me like she was using the common/living space of the suite on the 12th floor, but then how would Braasch have accessed it unless the door was open? (Or perhaps this suite has been converted to a common meeting room that anyone in HGS can access?) I’m not trying to take sides. I’m just trying to say that the story doesn’t make complete sense to me. Likewise, the earlier incident involving Siyonbola doesn’t make sense to me either. Here is an excerpt from the 5/10 Daily News article about the March incident:

        “In March, Reneson and Siyonbola submitted a complaint about a separate incident to Associate Dean for Graduate Student Development and Diversity Michelle Nearon. According to a copy of the complaint Reneson provided to the News, the incident
        began when Siyonbola invited several colleagues, including Reneson, to a meeting in the HGS common room on February 24. Reneson, lost in HGS, was physically blocked by Braasch from entering the common room after he asked her for directions, the complaint read.

        Reneson told the News that Braasch did not appear to believe that he was a Yale student trying to enter the HGS common room for a meeting, and instead accused him of being an intruder.

        Feeling ignored, I went down to the base of the twelfth floor and eleventh floor and turned my back, but she continued to verbally assault me from the twelfth floor claiming that I ‘didn’t belong here’ and I was making her ‘uncomfortable,’” Reneson said.

        Reneson said that Braasch then left the area, and Siyonbola subsequently showed up to begin the meeting. But, according to the complaint, four police officers then showed up in HGS to inspect a “suspicious character” on the twelfth floor. According to the complaint, shortly after establishing that Reneson was a Yale
        student invited by Siyonbola for a meeting in HGS, the police left.”

        Note that Reneson makes reference to having “went down” to the base of the 11th and 12th floor of HGS, where Braasch continued to verbally assault him (by either following him or shouting down the stairwell.) This implies to me that he was on the 12th floor (or possibly the 11th). There are only two rooms on each of these floors. No one goes up there by accident. The only way to get up there is by elevator or by walking up 12 flights of stairs. If I were a woman living in the single room on the 12th floor of the HGS tower, I’d be very concerned if I saw an unidentified man, black or white, seemingly wandering around on the landing outside my room for no reason. No one should be up there unless visiting her or someone in the suite on the other side of the elevator. This again makes wonder whether or not the “common room” referred to in both incidents is the living room of the suite on the 12th floor of the tower. Otherwise I don’t understand why Mr. Reneson would have taken an elevator up there. It’s 12 stories up in a tower that is in another wing of HGS from the large first floor common room. Certainly if the stranger on the landing told me they were looking for the large common room, I’d be very skeptical. Again, I’m not taking sides, but just trying to figure out what actually happened here. Ms, Braasch sounds like someone who is prone to overreacting and she may have some prejudices, but at the same time I’m puzzled as to how Mr. Reneson wound up in the 12th floor of the tower and why Ms. Siyonbola wanted to return to it. Do they have a connection to whoever lives in the 12th floor suite, such that she would study or they would hold meetings there? Or is this now a common space/study area high up in the tower across from Ms. Braasch’s room?

        As an aside, I find it astonishing that Ms. Braasch would not recognize Ms. Siyonbola, as they almost surely would have taken the HGS tower elevator together at least a few times.

        • Camela Hicks

          I think went down may mean “down to the other part of the building.” Not familiar with the location, but that’s what I thought it meant when I heard it.
          I hope you are a mystery writer! You have such a logical way of laying things out to show connections less adroit/trained minds would miss.

          • oldgrad

            Yes, “logically” deconstructing an account with no little to no factual knowledge of the location. Brilliant!

          • Sol G

            But you have by your own admission the same “little to no factual knowledge of the location” or of the events or of the applicable rules, but you are making all kinds of judgments and condemnations.

        • oldgrad

          If you’re not familiar with the building, why are you trying to pick holes in Reneson’s complaint? HGS has two common rooms, one of which is on the 12th floor. You can only get up there if you have a key — ie if you’re an HGS resident.

          • Sol G

            Which suggests that you’re not supposed to be there unless you are an HGS resident or accompanied by one.

        • Mexoplex

          Doesnt matter Captain Verbose. She shouldnt have called the cops- especially her being an “educated” woman. Maybe they need to look at the curriculum that’s being taught at that school. Stop making excuses.

          • Sol G

            Yeah, why bother with knowing the facts or applicable ruled or trying to understand what happened?

    • rosena

      This is an interesting factual question and should be figured out, for it could change the entire tone of what happened, making both the call reasonable and the graduate student’s reaction also reasonable, given that simple mistake may have happened about where the common room was and somehow the grad student was accidentally in a private quarter that startled the other student. Still, how the heck both of them could not figure it all out is inexplicable.

  • Gregory

    In the real world the caller is sued or worse. Has she ever called on any white people like she has called on black people?

    • Sol G

      It is far more likely in the real world that Ms Braasch – who is a lawyer – will be suing Ms Siyonbola, Yale and others for defamation, invasion of privacy, tortious infliction of emotional distress, and maybe a whole lot more.

      For example, in the real world those who make videos of their unconsenting apartment house neighbors in private halls and post them on Facebook with critical comments can end up writing very big checks for invasion of privacy. And accusing someone of racist motivation without a whole lot more evidence than Ms Siyonbola had here to the police, making a video of it, and posting it on Facebook, makes awfully fertile ground for a civil defamation action. And so on. Ms Braasch has been quiet while her critics have raged. I don’t know her and I don’t know what she might do. But one should not assume she couldn’t do plenty if she so chose.

      Just keep in mind: The real world is not the world of YDN commenters.

  • Mary Ann

    I completely agree. I have flagged it, too.

  • Progressives Progress

    Braasch should be expelled .

    • Pat Hughes

      No. Snowflake

  • Progressives Progress

    vet this one

  • mixed411

    Maybe don’t sleep in the common area. That is what you have a dorm room for and it should be equipped with a bed. Why does it always have to be a race thing? If the person sleeping was white and the cops were called would we have the same media attention? I’m sure people don’t want the homeless sleeping in college common areas, yet if the police can’t interact and interrogate that is exactly what will happen. This PC culture is too much. Oh Yea, you shouldn’t be allowed to use the bathroom at Starbucks if your not purchasing from the business. Private businesses have rights too.

    • The14th

      It makes the news because most people don’t get the cops called on them and grilled for 15 min just for nodding off where they’re allowed to be. If I took a nap in my workplace’s break room I might get an odd look for snoring or scolded for oversleeping my lunch, but I know for a fact they’d never call the cops on me. And I personally have taken naps in various public places and dorm couches, never merited even a glance from a security guard or janitor as far as I know. It’s not PC to expect somebody to give you a shred of common courtesy before treating you like a bum.

      P.S. – What does Starbucks have to do with this?

      • Sol G

        She wasn’t “grilled for 15 minutes.”

        • The14th

          She had a 15 minute police interaction in which she was repeatedly questioned on her right to be in that dorm. If you don’t like that, then I’ll go with the more formal term interrogated.

  • Mary Ann

    Are you a professional hater or something? Wake up. There is no reported evidence that anything here was “driven by the white student’s fear of the black student based on underlying racism that needs to be addressed.” That’s all something you pulled out of the waste bin of your own mind. The video shows her as genuinely afraid.

  • Mary Ann

    Thank you for your pronouncements.

  • Toto Pinocci

    Braasch should be suspended for swatting

  • Toto Pinocci

    Braasch should be suspended

  • Toto Pinocci

    B/raasch should be suspended for swatting

  • pav

    How about the university having a responsibility to the students by having someone like a guard to check common rooms and other areas to ensure students are reminded to return to their rooms?
    This young girl was obviously vulnerable whilst sleeping in the area
    Has anyone thought of that ?

    Not only is it ridiculous that she be interrogated, it shows lack of insight of the girl who called the police

  • $155779898

    They were investigating the possible commission of a crime, i.e. trespassing. Under Connecticut law it was a lawful order, you are obligated to identify yourself. It was a simple request, unless you enjoy making much ado about nothing…

    • RobertSF

      But why would they suspect this particular person of being a trespasser?

      • Tigger

        Because she was sleeping where she was not supposed to be sleeping. Seems simple to me

    • HansC

      Did the complaint call reference trespassing, or rather just sleeping in a common area?

      If that was the only issue, why did the police even bother coming out?

  • Jeanne Culbert

    I am thinking everyone is jumping to conclusions – in that perhaps NO ONE is supposed to be sleeping in the ‘common room” and THAT is the reason she reported it – NOT because the sleeper was a black person.
    Perhaps color had nothing to do with it at all!
    Jeanne

    • The14th

      Then the other student could have had a conversation about that, but that’s not what happened. Besides that, I recall very few common room rules in my dorm that threatened the cops to be called, usually it at the worst it was taken up with the hall’s RA.

      • Sol G

        No, Ms Braasch had no obligation to be an enforcer, if there is such a rule. That the YPD’s job. It’s remarkable that Ms Braasch’s critics criticize her for being some kind of busy body … and now we get this demand that she enforce a Yale rule.

        • The14th

          I’ll leave this site for good if you can find a sign in that dorm that says police will be called for residents sleeping in common areas.

    • Sol G

      That is rxactly correct, and it is YDN incompetence that the policy on sleeping in the common room is not known to the public.

  • Tigger

    Race here Is irrelevant. If you pass Out in a common room your credentials may be checked. Are we supposed to stop checking because someone is black?

    • Martha Smith

      This comment would be more persuasive if white students ever had their credentials checked when they fell asleep in a common room. Sure, don’t stop checking because someone is black. But also don’t start checking because someone is black. (Reading further in the comments, I see that YPD might regularly check credentials of students of all ethnicities. If that’s so, I withdraw this comment. I’m not sure how to delete it.)

      • John Dingle Barry

        Yes, they do and instead of having to withdraw your comment maybe you should do a little research before posting your ignorant drivel.

    • nutjob2

      Right, so standard procedure is to reflexively call the cops… if the person is black.

    • Abe Bagota

      I saw at least dozens of students passed out in the commons room when I was in college, and I don’t ever remember any of them ever being asked for ID or having the cops called on them. Where did you go to college?

      • Tigger

        Well gee, if your anecdotal experience is not the same at a completely different college then your bias must be true right? We’re the officers not supposed to check credentials because she was black? Or should they respond to every call equally regardless of the ethnicity? If you have evidence that the police do not check credentials of white students then present it.

        • RobertSF

          We’re the officers not supposed to check credentials because she was black?

          The dispatcher should have asked more questions. Ok, so there’s a person asleep. What specifically suggests that this person represents a threat?

          And the cops should not have come out at all unless there was some actual probable cause. “She’s asleep, and her backpack is open, and you can clearly see several handgun and ammunition in it.” That’s probable cause. “She just doesn’t look like she belongs” is not.

          The police seriously need to stop jumping every time some “concerned citizen” tries to sic them on their fellow man. Think of the abuse. Think of you being targeted. Every evening, two minutes after you arrive home from work, the police are at the door. “We got reports of a fight, somebody screaming? We need to come in and take a look around.”

    • RobertSF

      Are we supposed to stop checking because someone is black?

      Yes, that’s right. You are supposed to stop checking people because they are black. That is racism.

      • Tigger

        Do you have any evidence that white people are not checked? Or is you evidence your feelings? Purposefully not checking someone because of the color of their skin is the essence of racism.

        • DaTechPlace

          At this point, it matters less the evidence and it matters more the perception. In here, the white person is the bully. This is especially true if this has happened more than once and only to black people. In a way, that could be the evidence you need. How many times a white person has been questioned by a Police in that School?

      • Lauren Bertrand

        Don’t we hold black people to low enough standards already? Has it really helped their self-esteem? Wouldn’t it be better to just stop trusting the media’s integrity? Oh wait–we’ve already done that.

        • RobertSF

          I’m not talking about low standards. I’m not saying you should refrain from calling the cops when someone as acting anti-socially and just happens to be black. I’m saying you shouldn’t call the cops just because someone, who happens to be black, is doing something white people do all the time without a problem.

    • flame

      Where did you get off using the words ”pass OUT” in a common room? You’re a troubling making racist troll just like mass media and the rest of you inbred, roadkill eating, toothless, Mountain Dew drinking, meth smoking, lice, flea, mite and crab infested pox marked, sockless, greasy hair, matted facial hair, crusty skinned vermin. I could easily continue but you you’re already overwhelmed by how right on, I am in describing you and yours.

      • Tigger

        Thank you for proving exactly where the racism is coming from.

      • Lauren Bertrand

        Yes, mass media is truly racist isn’t it. They really took the side of the white-girl whistle-blower.

        • flame

          Yes they did!

  • Stacey Torreyson Roberts

    Would this even be a story if it was titled, “Student reported to YPD for napping in dormitory common room by another student”? No, it wouldn’t white and black has no relevance in this story other than to sensationalize this extremely ridiculous story.

    • Liz

      I guess you would say race was irrelevant since you are White.

    • Abe Bagota

      If you were repeatedly harassed by police because people thought that your ethnicity made you look suspicious, I’m pretty sure at some point you would find it worth telling other people about.

    • RobertSF

      No, but that’s precisely the point. Had the sleeping student been white, nobody would have called the cops. So yes, black and white has everything to do with this story.

      • Tennessee

        They don’t understand that.

    • John Robertson

      They try to make you feel guilty for being white. Too bad it isn’t working!

      • Tennessee

        Who wants you to feel guilty for being white?

    • Mikayla

      The point is this happens to people of color every day. The majority needs to understand that and stop pretending racism doesn’t exist.

      • Stacey Torreyson Roberts

        How small minded of you to assume that I pretend that racism doesn’t exist just because I’m white. I completely understand and am aware that this happens to African Americans, Asians, Hispanics, and many more people every single day. Don’t you think this particular story is slightly oversensationalized? The girl was napping in a hallway, which is against the rules; it makes little difference whether she was black, white, or a smurf. She was breaking the rules and someone called the police on her.

        • Mikayla

          Small minded? Ok. Why call the police over an RA? How often have students fell asleep in places other than their dorms rooms? Also why would that bother this student enough to call the police? The other student obviously isn’t homeless. They live in the same dorm building, most likely she’s seen her before.

  • J.j. Barrington

    You’re a fake.

    • td2016

      You are a jerk.

      • J.j. Barrington

        How so? I’m not the one pushing thinly veiled bigotry.

  • Charles Reid

    Britton O’Daly – May be a fascist in hiding. O’Dalys article mentions the black girls name 10 times and the white girls name 0 times. This is not right or fair and this is an subtle way of promoting a fascist ideology. O’Daly and the “white girl” probably voted for Trump and if they didn’t they are promoting this ideology with out knowing it. Wake up people!

    • Pat Hughes

      Grow up Charles! People like you who have not even contributed to society are the problem. A stirrer!!!!

      • Charles Reid

        That’s your response Pat Hughes! lol. You assume I’ve never contributed. Well when I was more able I did work and pay taxes, I was a draftsmen that designed credit unions and I owned my own incorporated company. The problem is people like you think that disabled people can’t contribute, but we can and we would contribute more if you would let us. Your view that “we” don’t contribute is a fascist believe by the way. I apologize for being a stirrer!!!!

      • Charles Reid

        That’s your response Pat Hughes! lol. You assume I’ve never contributed. Well when I was more able I did work and pay taxes, I was a draftsmen that designed credit unions and I owned my own incorporated company. The problem is people like you think that disabled people can’t contribute, but we can and we would contribute more if you would let us. Your view that “we” don’t contribute is a fascist believe by the way. I apologize for being a stirrer!!!!

      • Charles Reid

        That’s your response? You assume I don’t contribute. I have worked and payed taxes, I was an draftsman that designed credit unions and I owned my own incorporated company. The problem is people think that disabled people can’t contribute, but we can and we would contribute more if the system let us. Your view that “we” don’t contribute is a fascist ideology. I apologize for being a stirrer.

  • Bombhead

    The new America. Its racial until proven otherwise. Please people please stop it. Yale students are born with silver spoons up their ass, so we don’t expect them to get it.

    • The14th

      Ok, if you “get it” then what was this actually about?

  • Bombhead

    Hold on this is waiting to be approved by Yale Daily News

  • I_Am_Me

    I see the Pod People and their Outrage Machine are at it again with the victim narrative generators.

  • oldgrad

    I remember you, you’re the pretentious commenter who always pops up to defend racists on the YDN. The irony of you appealing to Frederick Douglass and his cause, to shame others, is revolting.

  • Rajeev Samuel

    Easy solution. Fire the officers! Just expell the complainer.

  • Rajeev Samuel

    Fire the officers! Expel the complainer!

  • Rajeev Samuel

    Fire the officers! Expel the complaining student!

    • Richard Mower

      or we could act like rational adults and follow protocal for this situation which is usually to fine/ticket the offender for making a false report, accept that the officers did their job which was to investigate a report of wrongdoing and get on with life. if you punish the police for coming when called, good luck next time you need a cop cause they won’t be coming

      • Rajeev Samuel

        Ok fine – she cried wolf. Its her funeral in the future when there is a real wolf shows up.

    • Lauren Bertrand

      Why stop there?! Let’s dismantle Yale altogether, brick by brick. Better yet, start with all the stained glass representations of John Calhou—oh, wait…too late.

  • Fiona McKay

    Racial profiling again by a bigoted, ignorant and arrogant white student. The cops are not much better but mind you American cops aren’t the sharpest knife in the drawer.

    • Pat Hughes

      Did you ever think perhaps she may also have reported a white person. Security for students and children is necessary in to-days world. An unknown person sleeping in a dorm! Safety goes beyond colour. All you snowflakes clinging to straws.

      • SamuelRossLee

        We MIGHT have thought that, except she’s done this before – to ANOTHER Black Student.

      • Aethion

        Very true. All these stories keep coming up about rapists, murderers and terrorists taking naps in full view of the people they’re there to prey upon.

  • oldgrad

    He was a Yale student. Why reason should anybody assume he was not a Yale associate or a non-Yale man?

  • Mulberry Field

    I see this as a typical female bully
    move. I remember this kind of petty thing happening in college. Would this tattle tale white lady have been able to get away with doing this to a Vanderbilt? Where was the RA or staff in the building? To me the person who calls the cops on someone writing a paper should have been looked at with suspicion. Why weren’t the cops getting ID on the person crying wolf? I’m white and I never get pulled over, followed in stores, or accused of being a prowler. The fact that the cops even came to the dorm room is an example of the kind of New Haven in which the Yale students live.

  • oblivion328

    Can’t confirm, but there are claims that Sarah Braasch has a history of calling the campus police on black students.

    • Richard Mower

      so what, when was she elected as the single representative of all white people? the actions of one person do not speak for all blacks just like when a black man rapes a 10 year old girl, that doesn’t make us all pedo rapists people represent themselves, not their race, sex, religion etc does Torquemada represent all Christians? does R. kelly or bill cosby represent all black men? hell no, then why does this one white woman suddenly stand for all whites in the world?

  • ArnieTracey

    If a re-stitched-together nation determines to use mutual hatred of blacks as solder to adhere North & south in 1877 (end of Reconstruction) then it spends 141 years ad nauseum, antipathetically excluding, hanging and reducing minorities, of course the nation is going to have a stratum of dysfunction within said minorities (ref.:New Haven riff-raff). But for majority-race citizens to be forever leaping to the reductive fallacy that infantile stereotyping, i.e. seen one, seen them all-ism, is the basis for intelligent deductions in given mixed racial, social situations, such stereotyping is not only preternaturally facile, and ultimately maladaptive, it’s flat doofus-making for the majority assumers, and crazy-making for their minority victims.

    • Richard Mower

      naw, dawg. we were doing good on getting over this racism stuff, until our greatest enemy was elected president 9+years ago. he divided this nation like it hadn’t been in 30+ years

      • putthisinyourpipeand .

        Truer words never spoken!!! We were doing quite good until we were calculatingly divided!

        • ArnieTracey

          You people have drunk the Kool Aid: See above reply to Richie “naw dog” Mower.

          • Lauren Bertrand

            You aren’t oppressed my friend! Neither are they. You–and they–live in a country of great opportunity. Equality of opportunity in fact. The fact that this minor incident (even more minor than the Starbucks kerfuffle last month) made national or international news is a testament to how desperate a corrupt and failing media is at wringing whatever is left of the oppressor/victim binary in order to “rock the vote” for the Party of Jealousy this coming November.

            If a situation this small provokes a racial imbroglio in a school as left-wing as Yale (that still manages to be racist), then the only thing YT can do at this point is cryogenically freeze himself/herself for __ number of years until the victim classes sort themselves out. But, we all know, there would be no thaw, because if YT goes, the victim classes will be at one another’s throats in their attempt to demonstrate how X is so much more victimized than Y.

          • ArnieTracey

            D+ – False logic.

          • Lauren Bertrand

            Keep dismissing those other views and continue on the same path you’ve been traveling for the last half-century, and eventually you’ll smack into Einstein’s putative definition of insanity.

          • ArnieTracey

            No. I’ll never join you there, there in a shaded place where 1+1=whatever you feel it should at any given moment.

            Lotsa luck with that fungible illogic.

      • ArnieTracey

        Seriously?

        Mass minority incarceration. Wealth nonexistent. Property ownership nonexistent and, what there is, is segregated. Unable to get call-backs for jobs. A black w/ a Bachelor’s degree is worth less to employers than white felons.

        Are you on the pipe?

  • oldgrad

    Ad hominem drivel is necessary to contextualize your comments, TrumpDolt2016, because you have a history of commenting frequently on race issues at Yale, occasionally showing your cards and posting honestly racist screed.

    Did I really compare somebody to Frederick Douglass? Must have missed that.

  • oldgrad

    There’s zero evidence for your story, or even that you attended Yale. You always harp about getting the facts first, but there are no verified facts in your math library tale.

    • td2016

      That comment is too ridiculous to warrant a response. You can’t even read and understand my math library story.

      On the other hand, your moniker is chosen to imply that you are an older graduate of Yale, but it is highly unlikely that the admissions office ever made a mistake that big and multifaceted. You also refuse to state squarely that you are a Yale grad of any age. So the evidence strongly suggests that you never attended Yale and likely have no serious relationship with it, but you try to make people think otherwise.

  • oldgrad

    I didn’t say anything about a telepathy hat. You avoided my question: what was it about him that made it seem like he didn’t belong in HGS?

    She must have seen plenty of white, “non-Yale men” in the building during the year, but for some reason she never felt obliged to call the YPD in those instances.

  • td2016

    O, yeah, let’s all get on the bandwagon!

    Race, Race, Race, Race, Race. Sis-Boom-Bah.

    Who needs thought or evidence?

  • Stan_LS

    So, what’s the policy on sleeping in the common room?

    • Sol G

      It’s really remarkable that the YDN has not yet attempted to andwer that question. The incompetence is jaw dropping.

  • Nancy Morris

    You can rant all you like, but nobody alleged that a crime had been committed in this case.

  • WokeJoke

    I feel like white women are the ones starting all this drama, so how about leaving us white men out of it.

  • Richard Mower

    first, when the police are called and informed that you may be trespassing, you kinda do have to justify your presence.

    second, you’re sleeping in a public area, that’s kinda specious
    is this an area students are supposed to be taking a nap in? ir is napping there against policy, like in most public places

    third, i here people throw the race card any time they are questions by the police, it’s funny in 44 years not once has anyone called the police on this black man. you might want to consider is it your color, or your attitude and behavior

  • runcotvs

    This publication and the moderator rejected a fair and polite previous comment. In contrast, some of the comments that have been accepted easily qualify as noxious, racist, and myopic. Not to speak of several repeats with the same verbiage (probably double/triple submits of the same comment). That’s how diligent, conscientious, and open the moderators and this publication are. Higher education? (sic!)

    That’s definitely some whining there, I’ll admit; my apologies. Here’s a synopsis of my proposal: how about the Philosophy department assigning for Ms. Braasch a project/paper on a hypothetical scenario: what if the person in the dorm room were in a burkha? What would her thinking and action have been? (For now, let’s forget the case of Mr. Revenson although the same question could address her thinking and actions are as relevant). This question addresses not only the subjects of Ms. Braasch’s scholarship (logic and game theory) but also her temperance activities – against the burkha, for women, divorcing moral underpinnings or drivers from law (crafting and executing). Wouldn’t the exercise also serve the “higher” purpose of an university?

    Can someone more familiar with this publication or Yale or media help me understand why they’d reject my previous comment proposing this? (Of course, I’m assuming they will publish this).

  • WeeFree ✓

    The KKK crew is apparently butt hurt, if you are so thin skinned you shouldn’t have left your mother’s basement.