The Yale Daily News

This article has been updated to reflect the version that ran in print on Nov. 6.

Surrounded by a sea of upturned faces and fighting back tears, Yale College Dean Jonathan Holloway stood on the Women’s Table Thursday afternoon before a crowd of more than 200 students to break the administration’s silence on allegations of racial discrimination that shook campus this week.

“It is painful for me — as someone who has a vested interest in supporting you — to hear what you have just told me, but I am glad you did…” he said. “I’m here for you. I do have your back. Please know that I have heard your stories and I’ll leave here changed.”

The speech came after three hours of emotional confrontation on Cross Campus, as hundreds of students of all races  encircled Holloway, who remained solemn as he listened to their stories and their calls for him to use his administrative position to advocate for marginalized groups on Yale’s campus. The impromptu gathering, which ballooned out of a chalking event on Cross Campus in support of Yale’s people of color, which Holloway had attended, came days after alleged racist behavior at a Sigma Alpha Epsilon party and an email from Silliman College Associate Master Erika Christakis criticizing over-sensitivity to cultural appropriation. Crowd members expressed their frustrations and anger at the current status of minorities on Yale’s campus. In addition to voicing their outrage and disappointment at the administration’s perceived inaction, minority students asked Holloway a question: To whom in the University administration can they turn for support?

Highlighting Holloway’s historic role as the first African-American dean of Yale College, students called on him to take action in support of racial minorities, especially women of color. They said they respected Holloway and the weight of his responsibilities, but they were disappointed in him both as a black administrator and as a black man. While it is challenging for minority students to make their voices heard by the entire community, they said, it is easy for Holloway to do so simply by sending out an email in his capacity as dean.

Many students burst into tears as they spoke. Holloway, who remained largely silent throughout the three hours he stood in the center of the crowd, was visibly moved, turning to face each student who spoke.

Students’ remarks extended far beyond the incidents involving SAE and Christakis, although they have served as the catalysts for an onslaught of discontent this week. Students called for sweeping administrative change, including the improvement of mental health infrastructure for minority students and the provision of Dean’s Excuses for students suffering from traumatic racial events.

At the end of the gathering, Holloway stood atop the Women’s Table to address the crowd in an emotional speech in which he promised to more fully embrace his responsibilities as a prominent black administrator and professor of African American Studies.

“Professor Holloway has a voice, but it’s harder for Dean Holloway to have the same voice,” he said. “[That’s] probably wrong. And I’ll do better.”

He also responded to students’ criticisms of administrative silence on racial issues, acknowledging that students may not always agree with his decisions.

“It is clear that what I’ve been trying to do quietly and behind the scenes has not been enough, and I acknowledge that,” he said.

Screen shot 2015-11-06 at 7.04.06 AM

Shortly after the gathering on Cross Campus, a crowd of students moved to the Silliman courtyard to continue chalking there. “Our culture is not a costume,” they wrote in bright colors on the ground. Shortly after, Silliman College Master Nicholas Christakis appeared before the crowd. A conversation ensued, in which many in attendance demanded an apology for the email his wife sent last Friday.

They criticized her for admonishing the Intercultural Affairs Council’s discouragement of culturally appropriative Halloween costumes. They also denounced Erika Christakis’ behavior during an open forum at the Afro-American Cultural Center Wednesday night. Students particularly disapproved of her attempt to leave the room before speaking or answering questions directed toward her, although she explained that she had a class waiting for her.

The tone of this confrontation differed markedly from the earlier discussion with Holloway. While the interaction with Holloway ended in applause for the dean, the large gathering around Nicholas Christakis abruptly dissolved when students stormed away in frustration.

“I apologize for causing pain, but I am not sorry for the statement,” Christakis, whose wife was not present, told the crowd, his voice raised. “I stand behind free speech. I defend the right for people to speak their minds.”

The gathering quickly became tense and confrontational after his shouted response. Several students screamed at Christakis, calling him “disgusting” and using expletives. They told Christakis they do not feel welcome in Silliman, noting that students usually look to their masters to advocate for them, but they are now unwilling to even receive their diplomas from him at graduation. Many said he should be removed from his post.

Christakis continued to defend his wife’s email, even jabbing his finger toward the individual students he was addressing. The conversation soon became a shouting match as both Christakis and the students tried to make themselves heard.

Disillusioned, about half of the crowd left the gathering within the hour, finding their demands for an apology from the couple unanswered. Those who stayed continued to express their frustration.

Later Thursday evening, Christakis hosted a Master’s Tea with Greg Lukianoff, president of the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, a nonprofit organization committed to defending individual rights on American college campuses. At the tea, which has been planned since July and is not in response to this week’s events, Christakis said recent discussions have redoubled his resolve and appreciation for the value of free speech.

While the tea was occurring, Holloway, University President Peter Salovey and several other administrators met with student leaders from various cultural groups. After the conclusion of the nearly five-hour meeting, Salovey told the News he is grateful that students have shared their experiences and time to make the University a better place.

“We had a very honest interchange, and I am working now with my leadership team to plan concrete steps for us to take to act up on concerns the students shared with me,” Salovey wrote.

Dean of Student Engagement Burgwell Howard — who was present at the gatherings with both Holloway and Christakis — emphasized that listening before taking action is the best way to advance the current situation.

“Dean Holloway listened,” he said. “He needed to listen and hear people’s pain first, before he is in a position to speak.”

Clarification, Nov. 7: This article has been updated with certain details that were omitted during the editing process, in order to present a more complete picture of Thursday’s events.

  • breakingbad23

    Stood atop the woman’s table? How mysogynistic…

    • Vanada

      and then he mansplained while jabbing his finger! to this little bunch of tender lambs. Cripes, now I’m hungry…

      • breakingbad23

        Well at least he didn’t manspread across the table…

  • basil

    Breaking news: Yale partnering with U-Wisconsin to ensure adequate cheese to accompany all the whine….. Give it a break already.

  • FiatJustitia

    I wasn’t present for Holloway’s conversation, but I did attend the bullying of Master Christakis.

    The behavior of many of the students at this “conversation” was absolutely reprehensible: Telling the master when he could and could not speak, not to break eye contact when they were talking, saying he was “fucking disgusting,” “you should not go to sleep at night,” and “fuck you,” among other choice displays of intellect.

    The conversation consisted of students saying that “they’re killing us here,” demanding that Christakis agree with them on the issue and that he abandon his intellectual position, responding that this isn’t an intellectual discussion when he attempted to defend his views, and claiming that his responsibility as master is to make a “safe home” for students and to “coddle” them if need be (the words of a student, not mine) and not to provide an “intellectual space.”

    As far as I could divine among the cries and derisive laughter and snapping, the only gripes with Master Christakis that these students could identify were:

    1. He could not remember the name of some students in his college. (Accompanied by some cries of “Well my college master knows all of our fucking names!”)

    2. He left the Afro-Am forum early.

    3. Though he apologized for causing pain, he would not abandon his intellectual position.

    The first of these is an excusable mistake for a master in his first year with the college and has nothing to do with race. As for the second, Master Christakis had to leave the forum early to attend to a student in the hospital awaiting surgery. And the last of these grievances is something for which I think any honest educated individual should applaud him. It is a sign of good character that one does not give up one’s beliefs under group pressure.

    If students genuinely disagree with the Master’s characterizations of the Associate Master’s email and about the importance of principles such as freedom of expression, then the proper course of action for these students in this situation should be to engage in conversation with him so that some mutual understanding might be achieved. Instead, the mob on the courtyard elected to throw expletives and scream in the master’s face. They shut him down every time he tried to explain how his commitment to freedom of expression did not mean that he did not see the legitimacy of students’ experiences.

    This incident should not be the standard for discussion on this campus. Whether or not you belong to an oppressed minority group has no bearing on the basic respect and civility that is owed to other human beings. No group has a monopoly on the suffering in this world, and one should not act as though membership in a group justifies verbal abuse and malice. I found the statements (if they could even qualify as such) inflicted on the master to be more severe and “offensive” than any example, substantiated or not, I have heard of or have had spoken at me.

    The height of my disappointment in my colleagues was to see the collective jeering and derision at the master’s statement that he believed in the capacity for people to understand each other through their shared humanity.

    As a minority student myself, I found the conduct of students on this occasion to be truly “disgusting.”

    • Vanada

      thanks for adding this, but have you considered transferring?

      • FiatJustitia

        Why would I transfer? This incident notwithstanding, the facilities here are nice, the location is perfect, I have good friends in the college whom I wouldn’t like to leave, and I have an admirable college master who has throughout this ordeal demonstrated upstanding moral and intellectual courage.

    • 100wattlightbulb

      This is what happens when you admit students who have no business at a top tier college, but Yale caved under the arm twisting of the White House (as did most of the other top tier colleges).

      • ldffly

        I was thinking the same thing. Soon Yale College will be working with 6000 students. Of what caliber?

      • groenima

        In the spirit of this week, white person who has sympathy for most sides in this complex debate, calling you on your over-the-top racism. I’ve always thought that posts like this are better just ignored…you’re just going to come back at me with something else nasty…but why should you get away with saying such ugly untruths without being called out?

        • 15gladyskravitz

          What was stated was factual. It’s an uncomfortable truth, but a truth, nonetheless. A percentage of students today are admitted and are under qualified. It wasn’t racist, it was factual. The admits include race, economic situation and first generation students. Those are not qualifiers, they are socially engineered constructs.

          • groenima

            I’m not at all uncomfortable with the truth that SATs are lower for certain populations at Yale. I’m asking why you’d argue that the SAT is the sole indicator of a student’s qualification when admissions is spending far more time looking at grades, course rigor, extra-curriculars, community service, work, essays, etc.. I have two Yalies, one who is a good test taker and whose SAT was 30 points from perfect, the other whose score was in the range of those students you’re claiming are unqualified. So I know, from personal experience, how much–or how little–SAT scores matter in the Yale admissions process–and in student success.

        • Veritas

          It isn’t racism. He/she is being a realist. Here is a truth: SAT scores are weighted, giving a 230 point advantage to black students, while taking away 50 points from Asians. Just because you are uncomfortable with the facts does not make them less true. While there are plenty of deserving black students at Yale, there are also some that seem to have chips on their shoulders and who instead of being thankful for the opportunity, would rather use their time biting the hand that feeds them.

          • groenima

            It’s factual if you are arguing from the premise that SAT scores are the gold standard for measuring students’ worthiness to attend elite schools. Yet studies have shown that, beyond, the first year, they have no relation to students’ future success in college. Standardized test scores are just one small piece of a high school student’s application; unfortunately, they are the only piece we seem able to focus on. At any rate, the most blatant racism I saw in the comment was the not very veiled reference to our first black President, who is somehow twisting Yale’s “arm” by doing something apparently too insidious to name.

    • CoryIntheHouse

      Congrats on being a thinking, rational person. We need more of you.

    • ldffly

      Excellent statement. Now let’s see if Holloway has the lower belly to identify and expel the students who perpetrated this confrontation.

    • Stewable

      I would have expected expulsion had I acted that way in college.

      • JTA

        I’m afraid that’s not how it works there. At a state university like UTexas, or a very small liberal arts college like Berry in Georgia, the money isn’t a big enough deal to inspire them to hang onto these students. But for Yale, the parents are paying a hell of a lot of tuition. Keeping the money is the most important thing for them.

        • ldffly

          That’s quite a change from 40 years ago. I remember expulsions being doled out for bad behavior. Expulsions didn’t happen in quantity, but they did happen. Case in point, the prank use of butyric acid in a college dining hall ventilation system in ’76.
          The loss of tuition from the expelled students could easily be made up by filling the slot with an eager transfer. There surely are plenty in waiting. I was one myself back in the 70s. If Yale wants to retain these foul mouthed students, it would likely be because they don’t want to take the risk of bad appearances and potential legal action.

          • 1Gandydancer

            Hardly anyone pays the list price for tuition, and as idffly observes there is no shortage of replacements. Nor would I think any legal action would get much traction, given the video, the likes of which could be a predicate for taking action. It’s just cowardice.

  • SY

    Why does this article feel so one-sided against Christakis? Why didn’t the News mention reaching out to Christakis for comment on yesterday’s events? I was not there myself, but what I’ve heard is that students were chalking there for a while before the more heated confrontation occurred. Why were any previous interactions left out of this story?

    And why was the line “jabbing his finger toward the individual student he was addressing” even included? Are hand gestures that are meant to emphasize a point now considered to be overly aggressive? As someone who is just trying to learn more about yesterday’s events I can already tell that this article is biased.

    • danzig138

      As is your admittedly uninformed opinion. Bias: it’s everywhere.

      • 100wattlightbulb

        So, basically, stop being human.

  • dcheretic

    Students need to be patient as the Yale administration investigates their various grievances. Premature judgement in the Duke lacrosse and UVA rape cases—both of which stemmed from bogus allegations—exposed those campuses to legal liability, and severely damaged the reputations of the women and minority groups on campus. A quality investigation that collects facts and treats all parties fairly takes time.

    I hope that the Christakis stand their ground. They have nothing to apologize for.

    Alum 1995

    • danzig138

      If I understand correctly, and I may not, the wife does have something to apologize for. She tried to make a free speech case on something that wasn’t. That was stupid of her. Though it’s not her fault that *everyone* involved then went full retard.

      • icetrey

        How is the school telling students what kind of Halloween costumes are appropriate not a free speech issue?

  • Vanada

    a “chalking event:? This really is just very expensive day-care, isn’t it?

    • http://www.artspace.com/magazine/interviews_features/lists/the-10-worst-ways-to-die-in-a-hieronymous-bosch-painting-53872 Hieronymus Machine

      Ha ha: c’mon! “Let’s chalk about it” is my new meme!

      “Hey, can we chalk about that?”

      • http://dan.tobias.name/ dtobias

        Don’t Chalk to Strangers
        All Chalk and No Action
        It’s so funny that we don’t chalk any more

  • fruck

    Wow. A little defensive there, Christakis? You can’t make your point without shouting at kids? Great role model for civil debate he is.

    • FiatJustitia

      The video doesn’t show the 90 minutes that preceded this during which he was not allowed to speak, and during which every form of verbal abuse and vitriol was levelled at him. Tensions were high and he had been asked (read: ordered) to speak louder.

    • Debate & Discussion

      I was present at this “confrontation” where this article greatly understates where” several students told Christakis they do not feel welcome in
      Silliman.” After the chalking event a crowd of over 100 students
      cornered Khristakis and commenced to harass him by shouted expletives and emphasizing the phrase “we know where you live” and other
      absolutely unnecessary expletives in the master’s face. They did not allow
      him to explain anything and honestly, they demand for safe spaces on
      campus while not providing one for our for Silliman students who may
      disagree or for our Master to even leave his house.

      While I am a minority student who absolutely agrees there is much change to be done, I question what this mob mentality achieves by shouting and cussing. This article only showed one side of the story, emphasizing his “jabbing finger” while completely excluding this abhorrent action that truly made me afraid of being in Silliman by my fellow minority students who commenced to only scream and shout. I understand their frustration. I have these frustrations myself; however, is this the best way to “discuss” or is this even a discussion at all. A great model of civil debate they are…

    • CoryIntheHouse

      You have absolutely no idea what you’re talking about.

    • http://dan.tobias.name/ dtobias

      The students seemed to do most of the shouting.

  • Twindad46

    Marginalized groups at Yale? Are you serious? You people attend one of the most expensive, exclusive universities on the planet and you have the nerve to think you’re marginalized? You don’t even know what that word means. You want to see marginalized? Go visit Christians or Yazidis who are living in terror in the Islamic State. Now that’s marginalized.

    Now grow the hell up and find something important to worry about.

    • 100wattlightbulb

      THANK YOU.

    • peachesorangesapples

      Honestly, with that kind of logic, we should all just do nothing with our lives since we’re going to die anyway.

      I hope you recognize the logical fallaciousness of your argument. The fact that horrible things are happening over the world doesn’t mean that the issues affecting students of color at Yale should not be seriously addressed.

      • CoryIntheHouse

        They aren’t real issues though. They’re grievances made up by a hysterical mob that are designed to elevate the social status of whoever is leading the mob.

      • icetrey

        The issue was Halloween costumes.

        • Bobby Obvious

          +1

        • RobertMosesSupposesErroneously

          Actually, the issue wasn’t even as real as Halloween costumes.
          The issue was an email about another email about the hypothetical idea of someone wearing a halloween costume.

    • Twindad46

      The point I’m trying to make is that if you are among the lucky .000001% that gets to attend Yale, you are not marginalized in any way, shape, or form. I would love to be so marginalized. If you’re at Yale and you think you’re marginalized, you are completely delusional.

    • ldffly

      Clearly, not exclusive enough. Anybody who uses a fighting word like fqqq toward a faculty member shouldn’t have been admitted in the first place.

    • Mario Rossi

      You forget that the people complaining about this are studying women’s studies, anthropology, political science and other non-majors. The actually serious Yale student body has better things to do than complain about microaggressions

  • acb2140

    Sorry, but is a man responsible for his wife’s actions? That doesn’t sound very feminist to me. It almost sounds… misogynistic!

    • http://bigdeemagnifies.blogspot.com Diana Morrison

      And patriarchal. Oooooo.

  • 100wattlightbulb

    The agitators are getting SO desperate. The race-baiter-in chief is about to leave office in a year and the progs can smell the tide turning from all obama’s policy failures from the top, down.

    • Peter Tobias

      Do you even know Obama’s stand on this type of controversies? It’s “students should not be coddled”.

    • Bob

      Dude, President Obama has nothing to do with this. It’s a simpleton’s game to view every conflict as conservative versus liberal. I’m no Obama fan but he’s gone in one year so get over it.

    • Jesse Larner

      Please give ONE example of Obama as a “race-baiter.” ONE. He is extremely non-confrontational on race, which is sad but perhaps predictable. Or maybe you think that even acknowledging that this country has any racial problems is “race-baiting”?

  • Louise Mensch

    Terrible misreporting, look at the below the line comments! There may be marginalized groups at Yale; Mrs. Christakis sounds like she is being hideously bullied and harassed, and the student paper is lauding her harassment

  • danzig138

    I think what a lot of people are forgetting or overlooking in all of this is that these are college kids being stupid. Last time I checked, that was half the point of going to college. So you could be stupidly outraged over things that deserve it *and* things that don’t. That’s been the case for at *least* 50 years. These kids will grow up, refine their views, and continue to fuck up the world like our grandparents, parents, and we have. Circle of of life, baby, circle of life.

    • ldffly

      Ok, college kids can be stupid. However, Yale College kids should be and usually are less stupid than run of the mill college kids.

  • eli1

    If UVA and Duke lacrosse has taught me anything, its that the “victims” in this case are lying. Just waiting for the truth to come out any day now…

  • http://calebpowell.wordpress.com Caleb Powell

    Now everyone gets to be a bigot. When everyone is a bigot, the word loses its meaning.

    It’s odd how the privileged and pampered make themselves into victims.

  • http://www.artspace.com/magazine/interviews_features/lists/the-10-worst-ways-to-die-in-a-hieronymous-bosch-painting-53872 Hieronymus Machine

    Dear Dog those students are dense. When is speech not free? “When it hurts me.”

    Oi veh. I finally rilly RILLY understand “the chickens have come home to roost.” Eat it, lib academe.

  • akihirochan

    Tone deaf, insensitive, pathetic people. Both Mr. and Mrs. Christaskis should resign before they bring more dishonor to Yale. They are paid to support and listen to students, not belittle and disrespect them. They are clearly not up to the task.

    • FiatJustitia

      I’m a person of color in Silliman and I feel that the Master and Associate Master support my rights.

      Try to imagine what it’s like to be a minority and to find that the whole campus is speaking on your behalf against ideas and values you hold dear. It’s frustrating.

      Disagreement with someone’s ideas warrants discussion rather than calls for resignation with the foregone conclusion that your stance on the issues is right–even if you find those ideas offensive.

      Never have I seen either Erika or Nicholas belittle or disrespect a student. Perhaps disagreeing with someone or taking offense to their ideas–even on ideas that you believe to be founded on powerful personal experiences–doesn’t necessarily mean that they disrespected you. Perhaps someone can acknowledge the legitimacy of another’s personal experience and also maintain different conclusions and ideas.

      What exactly is it that they’ve done which is so “pathetic” to you?

      • aaleli

        These students are people for whom nothing but a pound of flesh will suffice, and when they have exacted that, it will still not be enough because they have been brought up in an environment of disrespecting themselves and others. Agitation and aggression is all they know.

      • JetsFan1984

        Please run for political office. You have my vote.

    • 100wattlightbulb

      Clearly you need a pacifier and a blankie.

    • AlexR

      “support and listen” does not mean agree with. Mr. Christaskis listened and engaged in polite dialogue, despite the hostility being shown towards him, for about three hours. And he simply disagreed with the opinions expressed.

    • icetrey

      And here I thought they were paid to educate them.

    • http://dan.tobias.name/ dtobias

      Supporting free speech and the right of everybody to their own opinions instead of blindly supporting whatever student protesters are spouting this week is now “belittle and disrespect”?

      • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

        The students are ALWAYS smarter and more experienced than the teachers.

        Wait… what?

    • Jerry Vandesic

      Any Yale student that chooses to abandon Yale’s Freedom of Expression statement (“… when you agree to matriculate, you join a community where ‘the provocative, the disturbing, and the unorthodox’ must be tolerated …”) should probably leave school and go home and hide under their parent’s bed.

    • David

      I was shocked to watch this black student screaming at Professor N. Christaskis. Mr. Christaskis behaved calmly. On the other hand, the student used her rude F*&^* words and screamed at the professor in public. I couldn’t believe in my own eyes Yale had this sort of students with such a poor manner. Regardless who is right or wrong, the student behaviors surprised the public and disgraced Yale.

      • aaleli

        If the admin had any sense or spine these students would and SHOULD be expelled.

        • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

          If they’re there to learn, they need to be open to the concept that people aren’t always going to think like they do, and not threaten nervous breakdowns when differences occur.

          If they aren’t – they don’t need to be there.

        • Peter Tobias

          Are there not other, effective sorts of student discipline, for example, demanding a public apology to Mr. Christaskis.

      • 15gladyskravitz

        Well you haven’t spent a lot of time in urban schools then. This is what Yale has brought to bear on their campus. Socially engineered diversity. Not pretty is it?

        • Peter Tobias

          While I feel disgust at this particular student for swearing at Mr. Christaskis, I think you wrote too close to the “racist” category, because you implied that all white students would behave better and problems came to Yale only with students of color.

      • Veritas

        Using profanity to prove a point is a sign of unintelligence, truly.

    • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

      Sometimes supporting someone means telling them when they’re wrong and/or doing something stupid.

      In this case, the students were wrong and stupid to so blatantly show their ignorance and arrogance.

    • 15gladyskravitz

      Clearly you are in the minority. See what I did there.

  • SY

    On the “Overheard at Yale” Facebook group Peter Chung, one of the YTV editors at the YDN said: “YTV/YDN consulted with leaders in the BWC and students who were in the footage we have. We asked for permission from students and for the majority of the footage, students did not want to be in the video. What we’ve posted is what we’ve been given permission to post.”

    So…basically what was included in the article is what only one side of the disagreement felt comfortable being posted. And not the rest of the long discussion that occurred between the students and Christakis. I, for one, would really like to see the entire video, because I feel like I can’t trust the YDN to accurately portray the events that occurred.

    • icetrey

      What kind of a news organization asks permission to post video of a public event?

      • JTA

        Future Fox Hosts of America.

    • JTA

      You got that right.

  • Man Up

    Kudos to Dean Holloway and Professor Christakis for modeling mature, courageous behavior in the face of actions that were neither.

  • esstee

    I just watched the following clip of events regrettably excluded from the video above:

    How is this woman’s behavior acceptable? Are there no standards for civil discourse at Yale? Maybe my 32 years away from Yale make me out of touch with college life, but attacking and verbally abusing a college Master, not to mention one of the University’s most distinguished scholars, in this fashion is met with celebration rather than discipline? Literally shouting down and cussing out this *defender* of free speech and not seeing the hypocrisy in that?

    Disgusting and sad. This woman, and her supportive finger-snappers, should feel ashamed of themselves.

    I do hope that Pres. Salovey will speak soon and remind the students that he meant what he said in his recent Freshman address: http://news.yale.edu/2014/08/22/professor-woodward-s-legacy-after-40-years-free-expression-yale

    These students (at least some of them) are apparently thugs, not scholars. They demand tearful mea culpas, not reasoned and civil discussion. They believe in profanity-laced accusations and a rush to mob justice, not freedom of speech or due process. They should be shamed, not celebrated.

    • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

      It’s a replay of the Red Guard during China’s Cultural Revolution. Everyone who disagreed with the ‘common knowledge’ was publicly shamed and punished.

      If I were Yale, I’d refund the tuitions of those who participated in this event, and tell them to come back when they could listen to differing opinions without threatening to have a nervous breakdown.

      • 15gladyskravitz

        Refund their tuition? Are you kidding me? The majority of those protesting are on a “free” ride at Yale, courtesy your tax dollars through FAFSA and Yale making up the difference. They are the new ENTITLED group at Yale- contributing NOTHING. Not even money.

    • aaleli

      To answer your question: there are few standards at Yale, anymore, period. That’s the problem. Couple that with no consequences and you have this.

    • David

      How did Yale admit her in the first place?

      • John Smith

        Affirmative action.

  • esstee

    I just watched the following clip of events regrettably excluded from the video above:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9IEFD_JVYd0&index=3&list=PLvIqJIL2kOMefn77xg6-6yrvek5kbNf3Z

    How is this woman’s behavior acceptable? Are there no standards for civil discourse at Yale? Maybe my 32 years away from Yale make me out of touch with college life, but attacking and verbally abusing a college Master, not to mention one of the University’s most distinguished scholars, in this fashion is met with celebration rather than discipline? Literally shouting down and cussing out this *defender* of free speech and not seeing the hypocrisy in that?

    Disgusting and sad. This woman, and her supportive finger-snappers, should feel ashamed of themselves.

    I do hope that Pres. Salovey will speak soon and remind the students that he meant what he said in his recent Freshman address:

    http://news.yale.edu/2014/08/22/professor-woodward-s-legacy-after-40-years-free-expression-yale

    These students (at least some of them) are apparently thugs, not scholars. They demand tearful mea culpas, not reasoned and civil discussion. They believe in profanity-laced accusations and a rush to mob justice, not freedom of speech or due process. They should be shamed, not celebrated.

  • Juan Diaz

    Free speech is free speech, and there is no place at Yale for those who will not respect it. I heard a lot of offensive comments when I was at Yale, and that was one of the many reasons I was glad to be there. Listen to what many of these folks are saying and you may learn that playing the victim will leave you less informed and unable to move beyond your narrow view of society. I am glad that when I was at Yale, people could civilly discuss these matters. Yale needs to return to a civil discussion of these issues and defend free speech at all cost.

  • http://bigdeemagnifies.blogspot.com Diana Morrison

    Oh my goodness, children. You need an intensive course in growing up.

  • germ_16

    It’s clear that being sensitive and understanding of the thoughts and feelings of these students is not enough. They demand any who disagree with their worldview to be silenced, and in their eyes that only means racists lose out. However, in actual practice it stifles the ability for open discussion and unbalances the power dynamic between students and administration. Some students seem to be aware of this, but feel that it’s an easy sacrifice to make. The college administration must make a strong stand for free speech on our university campuses. It’s clear that these students are not interested in debate, only in cowed compliance. Being exposed to new ideas and mindsets is a huge part of the college experience. This looks more and more like a power struggle, and many people are foolish enough to believe that the underdogs should always win. I refuse to back those who would silence me.

  • Bobby Obvious

    Terrible one-sided article for those who watched *all* the videos. I’ll just quote from President Obama, “I don’t agree that you, when you become students at colleges, have to be coddled and protected from different points of views”

  • eli1

    Other news outlets have published the videos of the mob cussing out the Silliman master. Why haven’t those been published by the YDN so people can make up their own mind. Talk about biased journalism…

  • Joel B1

    America, the land of the weak.

  • David

    Students used her rude F*&^* words and screamed at Professor in public. I couldn’t believe in my own eyes. Regardless what was right or wrong, Yale’s students disgraced Yale in my view.

    • Caleb Greene

      And then this shill calls that a “conversation.”

    • JTA

      These kids have never been denied anything before. They’ve lived in privileged neighborhoods, and been admitted to a prestigious institution, with a lot of helicopter parenting. They cannot handle rejection.

    • Mulberry Field

      What kind of school allows its students to abuse their professors/administrators in that manner?

      • ldffly

        I never heard that kind of abuse when I was there. I’m sure it wouldn’t have been tolerated had it happened.

  • dbr1

    The right to speech vs the right not to be offended. Which will we choose?

  • cbarr

    and the age of entitlement continues….so it’s not just those milking to welfare/social systems , it stretches to all of these pampered children as well, to the detriment of us all…no true world view, myopic, self-centered……..me, me, me, 24×7

    • fare_thee_well_obama

      thanks for the not listening …

  • Fred_Z

    The USA is doomed. Probably western civilization too.

  • Deathshot

    You guys just can’t see past your white privilege. As a society, we cannot sleep until there exists in this cruel world NOT A SINGLE offended black man, woman, or child. Until then, your liberties are suspended.

    • george

      Still using critical race theory, pathetic.

      • Deathshot

        I was being sarcastic. Nobody agrees with these… Children.

    • JTA

      “We’re under threat from the Nazis. Your civil liberties are suspended”–Russia, 1940.

      • Deathshot

        You’re a sharp one, friend.

    • robert99

      I sleep quite soundly, thanks. But wait, you’re being facetious aren’t you, you clever devil!

    • Silence Dogood

      Hah, the sad thing is that it’s gotten so bad this is almost a Poe’s Law situation. Fortunately I can detect the delicious sarcasm here.

  • Peter Adolf

    Christakis was defending the general value of offensive/obscene speech to those to whom the particular offensive/obscene speech at issue was directed. In response he got offensive/obscene speech directed at himself, which he then couldn’t handle. Free speech looks different when it’s coming at you. And he is a while male college professor who I doubt grew up struggling in a society rooting against him. It suggests that if he truly empathized with the students of color who made it to Yale and understood their personal struggles he might see the balance differently.

    • Bobby Obvious

      No, watch the video. They shouted him down to “be quiet” and were offended that he disagreed with them. The only attempt at a real discussion with the free exchange of ideas was by Christakis.

      • Peter Adolf

        Christakis was advocating for the right for students not just to advocate for ideas, but to be boorish and offensive. He was talking to students who have been the victims of that same boorishness and offensiveness. So they became boorish and offensive at him. He should have no complaint. Free speech looks different when it’s pointed at you.

        • Peter Tobias

          Has anybody scream “shut up” or “you are disgusting” at the offended students? If you can’t show that or similar offenses, you have no ground to stand on.

        • Silence Dogood

          Determining whether or not something is boorish and offensive is entirely subjective. Your continued racism, elitism and general bigotry in the name of “righteousness” is what is truly deplorable.

          You first make a claim about behavior and when it is soundly refuted you not only shift the goal posts but then immediately jump into an “ends justifies the means” stance. Let me guess, a little bit Marxist in our thinking, are we? And no, deary, free speech looks the same no matter WHO it’s pointed at; if you get offended by someone’s expression of free speech, that is your right, but you certainly don’t have the right to try and censor them.

          Ladies and Gentlemen, it would appear fascism is making a comeback.

        • Bob

          “She” was advocating for the right of students to push boundaries and for other students to allow it because they, in turn, will need room to push without condemnation. That’s what college is all about. Unfortunately, the current culture on campus pushes for ever increasing Balkanization of students based on rigid group identities and totalitarian dogma. This results in weekly, if not daily, internecine conflicts between these groups, and constant conflict is both exhausting and a waste of time that could be spent on academics. It’s also really, really expensive as the various identity groups, even after hoax racist events, demand the school implement new “programs” to solve the latest offense, which requires hiring ever more administrative staff.

          Students during the ’60s – ’90s entered college as adults and demanded schools abandon their en loco parentis authority because they could work things out for themselves. Now helicopter parenting has created stunted 17-18 year old children who demand that colleges reestablish their en loco parentis role because they need paternalistic structure and oversight. Meanwhile they bitch about the rise in tuition required to pay for all this mess. The inmates really do run the asylum.

        • Prince Monolulu

          Have you read his wife’s email? She merely had the temerity to suggest that Yale, not being a kindergarten, it wasn’t up to administrators to police students’ choice of Halloween dress.

          • Šibanje Napušavanje

            Ah, but you being reasonable and pointing to facts — rather than personal choice for perception of facts — are the arch-enemy of the debate.

            Just wait until you are covered in mud in due course, you conceited, self-aggrandising rationalist, you!

    • germ_16

      If you watch the numerous videos where close to 50 students are surrounding him, demanding him to speak the way they want him to, to say what they want him to say, and then eventually cursing at him hysterically, he seemed to handle the situation quite well. You’re making assumptions about his economic and social background based only on the knowledge that he’s white, or really, since you don’t truly know what race he might actually be or identify as – your assumption that he’s white. You’re using his race to invalidate his opinion, and I find it hard to take someone who would do that very seriously. If you cut white people out of the conversation based on their race alone, you will not find many allies, and I can guarantee you that there will be no positive change in that situation. He listened to these students for quite some time about their experiences, but the fact remains that the solution these students were looking for were pure censorship, without evidence of any actual wrongdoing.

    • icetrey

      So no white or asian kids who make it to Yale have personal struggles that need to be understood?

      • Veritas

        Shut your mouth! White people have no such struggles. We wake up each day to sunshine and birds chirping.

      • Twice the Loyalty

        I am both white and asian but I’ve learned that white and yellow are not what they mean by “people of color.”

    • Echo

      “Couldn’t handle”? He handled it with aplomb, if you’d actually watch the video.

      They screamed at him, he reasoned with them. Are you on the side of the mob?

    • J-

      Free speech is free speech. Don’t give me “if he truly empathized with the students of color…” It was two JEWISH attorneys from the ACLU who defended the American NAZI party before the Supreme Court for their right to march in Skokie, IL. That’s what freedom of speech and American values looks like. This is BS.

    • Pete McCutchen

      Is there any evidence he can’t handle it? He certainly put up with plenty of nonsense, tried to engage in discussion, etc.

    • Silence Dogood

      Mmmm, no, you’re wrong. Offense is taken, not given. There has to be intent to cause harm, in the case of “cultural appropriation” (oh please, enough with this imaginary garbage). And what do you mean “he couldn’t handle it”? He was polite, direct and firm in his convictions and the crowd crescendo’d with some shrieking “woman of color” demanding he protect their fee-fees and that “it isn’t about creating and intellectual space”. That is ALL university is about – intellectual development. You are supposed to be challenged in EVERY facet of your thinking, especially the disgusting dogmatic ideology spoon fed to young people in this country. These students are just entitled children who want to be coddled and oppress the speech and expression of others to get a power rush.

    • EarlVanDorn

      Don’t be silly. The Christakis letter was not defending the general value of offensive speech. It was rather suggesting that people not get so wound up over every little slight. Insofar as Halloween costumes go, virtually everything is now considered “offensive.” Even the Wiccans are upset when people dress as witches.

      Neither of the Christakises ever suggested that uncivil or racist behavior was acceptable. The students who subjected them to the rude, expletive-filled tirade certainly need to be put in another residence where they will feel “safe,” because normal people have no desire to be around them.

  • Bobby Obvious

    I’ll quote Obama, “I don’t agree with that either — that you when you become students at colleges, you have to be coddled and protected from different points of view. Anybody who comes to speak to you and you disagree with, you should have an argument with them, but you shouldn’t silence them by saying you can’t come because I’m too sensitive to hear what you have to say.”

  • https://www.maroonmed.com maroonmed

    Can we start up one of those Facebook confessions pages for Yale? I feel like there are a lot of things that need to be said.

  • https://www.maroonmed.com maroonmed

    Is there a petition yet to have the girl arrested for disorderly conduct? Because IMO she definitely qualifies.

  • Charybdis

    Yale’s administration (college masters, dean’s office, and such) has seemed to be increasingly trying to restrict speech and behavior that it doesn’t approve of. The new hazing policy, for instance, allows administrators huge leeway to call any activity they don’t like hazing and punish it accordingly. I find this extremely worrying. I hope that the over-the-top attempt of student activists to police the speech of administrators might possibly open their eyes to the way that disciplining merely offensive speech or behavior is antithetical to a good academic environment, and certainly in opposition to the healthily open discourse that used to be a hallmark of Yale’s culture.

    • ldffly

      This administration appears to be doing something similar with the faculty. That is why I think we all need to keep an eye on the fate of Christakis.

  • george

    These students are weak and pathetic.

  • Matt

    Harden up.

  • Miguel

    Pathetic delicate snowflakes at Yale – aspiring little tyrants, the lot of them. What I find particularly repulsive is just how much the university (I’m looking at you, faculty and administration) facilitates and coddles such behavior. I am also disheartened to see a complete lack of critical thinking and self awareness among these children.

  • quals

    Amusing how lots of these kids wouldn’t have gotten in here if it weren’t for affirmative action, but rather than being grateful to Yale, they turn around and bite the hand that feeds them. Talk about entitlement…

    • 15gladyskravitz

      I think therein lies the rub; THAT is actually from where their anger emanates.

    • David

      “Amusing how lots of these kids wouldn’t have gotten in here if it weren’t for affirmative action…”
      You have no idea how right you are. As someone who is privy to SAT/ACT scores, let’s just say maybe it’s time for Yale to apply the same acceptance standards across the board. Maybe it would result in less cursing and spitting.

    • thubten

      Affirmative action.Fifty years of failure.Kick them back where they belong

  • shk12344

    I love it when liberals fight liberals. This is what liberal professors have created after all these decades. Enjoy!!

    • 15gladyskravitz

      It’s called wallowing in your own feces…

  • Harvey Birdman, Esq.

    You understand that “standing up” to administrators whom your parents pay high six figure salaries is rather like “standing up” to your own butler, right?

    I mean, you’re free to be the punchline to a joke even Obama tells, if that’s what you want. But you deserve to know that you are, in fact, the punchline.

  • Odysseus

    Congratulations, Yale students. You’ve made fools of yourselves, nationwide.That video is not going to get spun.

    • Peter Tobias

      That video should stay enshrined for the intolerance of those who want to feel warm and coddled at Yale and not challenged intellectually.

    • 15gladyskravitz

      Yale would be wise to expel her. That is unacceptable behavior on every level.

  • https://www.maroonmed.com maroonmed

    Damn, she’d be so much more credible if it weren’t for that North Face backpack.

  • robert99

    I think that some of the shouters think that they are appearing “concerned, involved, and relevant”. They are really just posturing and foolish. And are bringing no credit to themselves or their “cause”, whatever that is.

  • robert99

    I am surprised that some of the shouters even used the word “master”. That has slavery overtones!

  • Pastafarian70

    I’m a small business owner. At the risk of offending and shocking any Yale students reading this: At this point, an Ivy League diploma serves as a red flag to employers, and as a disincentive for hiring that applicant, because of foolishness like this.

    • http://www.artspace.com/magazine/interviews_features/lists/the-10-worst-ways-to-die-in-a-hieronymous-bosch-painting-53872 Hieronymus Machine
    • Eupatoria

      I am an actual Yale graduate, and I have sadly heard that sentiment too many times from employers. We are not talking i-banking and consulting of course, but lots of companies are really weary of the Ivy entitlement.

  • Phil Ostrand

    When I graduated Yale, I came out believing that Progressives stood for free speech and the power of ideas to win the argument. Today I would come out a Conservative. These students do not understand what freedom is and means.

  • jamesgd

    seems people arent actually concerned with protecting free expression, but stamping out political correctness. people here are calling for disciplinary action against students, even arrest, over verbally disrespecting christakis. you cant have your cake and eat it.

    • 1Gandydancer

      The right to free expression doesn’t include the right to shout others down without consequence. And you certainly don’t have any right to remain a student at Yale if that’s the way you behave.

      • jamesgd

        generally it does, thanks to the 1st amendment. thats not necessarily the case on private property, which yale happens to be, but that student is facing no consequences as far as i know.

        • 1Gandydancer

          Actually, it doesn’t. E.g., the US Senate is not private property but has a public gallery. Go there and start shouting and see how far the 1st Amendment gets you.

          The student in question could certainly be expelled with no recourse on her part. If the university doesn’t choose to enforce a code of civility on its students that is a choice, not a function of 1st Amendment right, and the public or private nature of Yale is not a relevant issue.

          • jamesgd

            i said generally. and im right despite your citing a few corner cases. no one is getting arrested over that, and probably no expulsion either. get over it.

          • 1Gandydancer

            Your generalization is completely wrong.

            And I said the decision not to expel the student is a choice. The fact that it will not occur is unsurprising to me — I don’t know why you would think otherwise. I am contemptuous of both parties involved here.

          • jamesgd

            there are plenty of realworld examples, including caselaw, where people have shouted others down without consequence by right. your claims are patently false. have some dignity.

          • 1Gandydancer

            “plenty of realworld examples” does not a “general rule” make. This is not a “corner case”, and your dignity would be better defended if you stopped pretending it is. There is no doubt Yale could expel the student IF it chose.

  • chuckles99

    As the hispanic parent of a high school senior, there is no way I want my daughter to attend Yale. The behavior of the students was obnoxious, the use of expletives to shout down a college Master evidenced a total lack of civility, and the university’s response was lame. Yale is creating a false world where students are protected against non-existent threats. Utterly, utterly unimpressive. Watching this on the national news was an embarrassment.

    • JTA

      Try this place. http://berry.edu

    • ldffly

      This is a shame. I loved the place and am totally grateful for providing an opportunity for a first rate education. That said, I would not want to be there now. It is a different place.

  • 15gladyskravitz

    The majority of those protesting are on a “free” ride at Yale, courtesy your tax dollars through FAFSA and Yale making up the difference. They are the new ENTITLED group at Yale- contributing NOTHING. Not even money.

  • 4more444

    As a graduate from the days when women were a 20% minority at Yale, I applaud the students for having the courage to voice their own fears, pain, and vulnerability, and I support Dean Holloway’s willingness to engage with them. I don’t like vulgarity either, but it’s really beside the point. Making this solely about First Amendment rights is as disingenuous as making the epidemic of gun violence about Second Amendment “freedoms.” Such freedoms can only be meaningful when everyone has equal access to them, and this is precisely what the student are trying to address. Judging from the many comments below that attack these students from a perspective of enshrined racial and/or patriarchal privilege, and that feature overt or veiled references to virility, it would seem that until Yale’s crippling brand of patriarchy is also addressed, race, gender and class will be as confounded a source of conflict as they were when I was in school. It seems to me that it is some of the commentators below who can’t “handle” actual free speech, particularly when it comes from women, and most especially when it comes from women of color. Get a grip. Want to stretch your intellect a little? Read more about it here: http://as.vanderbilt.edu/religiousstudies/people/whatraceisyoursex_pdf.pdf

    • Odysseus

      This comment very helpfully illuminates how Yale has changed and what sort of graduates it now produces.

    • 1Gandydancer

      The chapter at your link is as meaningless and unreadable as your prose here. Same author?

  • barber

    This is not the behavior of young people who feel intimidated and “unsafe.” This is theater.

    • Jesse Larner

      EX.ACT.LY. It’s a calculated path to power.

  • Silence Dogood

    As much as this biased excuse for an article (oh, wait, it’s a blog) makes it out that the children- I mean, “students” were measured and reasonable in their anti-free speech bigotry, the videos that have surfaced show they to be shouting, hysterical brats poisoned by the “social justice warrior” and “intersectional feminism” cult movements. These people need to GROW UP and realize that we’ll never move past racial tensions if they don’t lighten up and realize that offense is TAKEN and not GIVEN. If there is no intent to cause harm in something as trivial as a Halloween costume, then there IS NO HARM! It’s like students with Grecian ancestry having a hissy fit over a Toga party; utterly ridiculous nonsense.

  • Veritas

    Lol, if the students are offended now, just wait until they get out into corporate America where their delicate sensibilities will be crushed into oblivion. Good luck in the unprotected real world.

    • ldffly

      Funny thing, I think I learned about ruthlessness in the corporate world by being a graduate student in the philosophy department in the late 1970s and early 80s. It was unreal.

  • Mulberry Field

    Will someone please tell me where these students are seeing all of these racist Halloween costumes? I’ve seen blackface once in my life and I’ve never seen a klan or Nazi costume. Blackface is already socially unacceptable and that is why you never see it. What is this even about an American Indian costume? Geisha girls? There appears to be lingering racism and class discrimination at Yale but this dean is not going to solve that problem by buying into this myth that he is there to get a good yelp review for being a sufficient hotel concierge. As another commenter said it is like yelling at their butler ha ha !

  • Prince Monolulu

    “Many students burst into tears..”

    😀

    A few years in a coal mine would do these babies a world of good.

  • browninghipower

    As a Yale graduate coming up on 50 years, I’m trying to wrap my head around this. In the ’60s we got radicalized. We tried to be ‘smart’ about our positions, but those of us on the left were very opinionated and damned vocal about Vietnam, racial issues, the college takeovers, the Black Panthers, the Demonstrations, etc. At Yale, we hated Robert Bork; we had the likes of John Bolton in our Class; Michael Medved; W was lurking about; the Old School Legacy types were still prevalent; there were many many heated arguments. But no one…no one demanded the banning of speakers. Hell Reagan was a 5-day guest in my residential college and we all were laying in wait to challenge and hate him. He was gracious and stood his ground and no one was insulting or insulted. It was intense, but he gave as good as he got and even drank as much wine and beer as we did. It wasn’t halcyon days by any means, but did we want to be coddled and feel like home? Hell no. We argued and fought but the thought of shutting someone down or whatever these students are doing now was unthinkable to us. Yeah, Bolton was an asshole then. Medved was an arrogant snob with his ideas as were any of those young conservative farts, but they all held their ground as we did. That was the joy of Yale and all of us having a lot of brains, piss and vinegar. All of us except for W and his pals. 🙂

    • Twice the Loyalty

      Your post should be required reading for new Yale undergrads.

    • Odysseus

      Seems like that Yale is long gone. Welcome to the new Yale!

    • Twice the Loyalty

      Wanted to ask you… it sounds like your political views changed a bit but we all agree, Bolton is insufferable, right? Brings nothing to the table, is a shill, etc

  • MerryM

    Another story proving that liberalism is a mental disorder.

  • John Smith

    Can we just skip the foreplay and get to the civil war already?

  • LesleyMiles

    Why would anyone hire a student from Yale ever again? A bunch of rude pseudointellectual cry babies who can only scream and curse instead of win a real debate. Sad for what used to be a great school.

  • Sad Parent

    As a parent of a recent Yale graduate I’m saddened by the events of the past week on campus. The reports and video clips paint a picture of student life that seems totally foreign to my experiences during my many enjoyable visits with my child on campus. That being said, I do not have first hand knowledge of campus life nor any purported oppression of any minority persons or groups occurring there. My child, being a minority, never reported any such occurrence to me over the four years attended.
    What I do have is a profound understanding of what a privilege it was and is for my child to have matriculated from such a respected institution. The news reports and videos are doing untold harm to this reputation, but unfortunately, it is understandable how this could have happened.
    Policies promoted by the Administration have given rise to the type of disrespectful confrontation shown on the video, where a student yells at the Master, using profanity laced language, knowing that she will not only not be held accountable but praised in some circles for her “courage.” This disgusting display of immaturity and disrespect must not be allowed to represent Yale to the outside world.
    The Administration faces a critical choice; continue its acquiescence to political correctness and the hunting down and elimination of micro aggressive behaviors or stand up for sanity and common sense by first suspending or expelling the student who undoubtedly broke the conduct code in berating Master Christakis. The world has seen this behavior and if it is left unpunished, its ramifications will have a lingering negative effect on the reputation of Yale.
    Actions should have consequences. We are seeing the consequences of Yale’s Administrative policies unfold on the internet. Will we see any deserved consequences paid to the disrespecting students or will the lack of common sense take further root in the Yale community? If the latter then the speed down the slippery slope to anarchy just hit hyper drive.

  • Rewporoo

    These are infantile children. I’d hire a high school graduate without these emotional problems over any of these babies. I don’t care that they’re Yale students. They are unfit for the real world.

  • desertCard

    Way to downplay the confrontation. You make it seem she was upset and may have thrown a few cuss words around. She verbally assaulted and, if Christakis had made the wrong move, I’m not sure she wouldn’t have physically assaulted him. What kind of young adults are these? Telling a professor/master to “shut up” when they express themselves like the students want to express themselves. Don’t be such a patsy.

  • R. H.

    I am a Silliman alum. The students who yelled at Master Christakis should be suspended or expelled. No matter what their views on Master and Mrs. Christakis, or Yale, or the conduct of other students, there should be no tolerance for such behavior towards a school official. Cursing! The students who yelled and screamed don’t deserve the respect they claim they deserve. They are spoiled ingrates who have had the world handed to them, and yet the spit in the faces of those that are there solely for their benefit. Also, they are doing no favors for people of color by embodying — for all the world to see — stereotypical “ghetto”/” angry minority” aggression that only exacerbates and enables the bigotry that they are trying to fight. Was it unwise for the master’s wife to write such a controversial email? Probably, but she was within her rights to do so as a citizen of the U.S. and of Yale. There is no excuse such shameful behavior from the students. This is not a proud time for alums. Those students have embarassed me, and Yale, and the world can’t unwatch what happened.

    • ABC123

      There has to be something in the rules of Yale that expel or at least suspend a student for this behavior. If they want to protest (even though they are wrong) they are allowed to do so and the school would likely allow them to as long as it is done peacefully. This however is unacceptable.

    • http://www.artspace.com/magazine/interviews_features/lists/the-10-worst-ways-to-die-in-a-hieronymous-bosch-painting-53872 Hieronymus Machine

      “For liberals, cursing becomes the de rigueur tool for showing their superiority of emotion, [embodying] the post-modern flight from rationalism coupled with a decline in emotional and verbal expression.”
      https://ricochet.com/archives/liberalism-cursing/

      Research published in the journal PLOS One: “After removing most commonly used English words, the study found that “f–k” and “s–t” rank among liberals’ top ten most used words” and also uncovered that liberals use more self-referential language, employing the words “I” and “me” more often than conservatives, who opted more for group words such as “we” and “us.” Con/Lib differs in emphasis: I *care* versus *I* care.

      “This is, I think, part of what William F. Buckley Jr. was getting at when he wrote, ‘I mean to live my life an obedient man, but obedient to God, subservient to the wisdom of my ancestors; never to the authority of political truths arrived at yesterday at the voting booth.’ The Left, and authoritarians of all colors, also mean us to live our lives as obedient men — obedient to them.
      http://www.nationalreview.com/article/378431/signifying-state-kevin-d-williamson

    • Sillimander

      Though I disagree with the students’ behavior, I can tell you (as a current Sillimander) that this is not just about the email. Christakis does not create an atmosphere that is welcoming. He is arrogant and bullies students and staff. Joelle just retired (I was informed by others in the office that Christakis bullied her). I have been personally been berated by him for coming to him with a problem. Frocos don’t feel they can take problems with freshmen to him. His is indifferent to the happiness or health of students. He constantly talks about how intelligent he is. I saw some sillimanders in the crowd, and I know many were angry simply because of his general attitude. To clarify, I do actually agree with his wife’s email.

      • Brutus

        Another Silliman Alum here. Care to give an example of this behavior, even a vague one? I have merely read the email and articles detailing the ensuing fracas, but know nothing of Christakis’s character.

        Your indictments are sharp. It would show integrity to elaborate on them.

  • ABC123

    Obviously what Christakis said is right most people agree with that. However there is a far more confusing thing with this protest. The protesters are demanding that a certain percentage of black faculty be hired. They are demanding hiring faculty not based on merit, but simply on the color of their skin. Aren’t the protesters being racist? Demanding that more be done to address racial incidents that makes sense. Demanding that you hire faculty based on merit and not skin color everyone agrees with that. Demanding that a certain number of faculty members be hired because of their skin color. Does that make any sense?

    • thubten

      “They are demanding hiring faculty not based on merit, but simply on the color of their skin”
      And that is exactly how the student body was selected

  • Sad Parent

    If Yale is to accept the premise that minority oppression more than exists, but is rampant, at the institution, they risk being defined by this moment and all you alum will carry that stigma for the balance of your career lives everywhere you try to go. It is a shame but will be your reality as you try and explain away what the Administration has done in your every social and professional interaction in the future.

  • Sad Parent

    Maybe the Administration should have read and followed the guidance offered in this article published in TIME by the Christakis’ in December 2012. They wouldn’t be in such a pickle right now: http://ideas.time.com/2012/12/04/wither-goes-free-speech-at-harvard/

  • Sad Parent
  • Jeff P
    • Spicy Ray Swinehart-Patrick

      Signed!

  • Jeff

    As a foreigner, I’m sad about the fact that this country is becoming more and more anti-white.

  • sweetpea

    Yale students are among the most privileged people on this planet. These protesters are either liars, knowing that they are privileged and yet portraying themselves as victims, or they are Fools, completely ignorant of the fact that they are privileged and not in any way marginalized nor victimized. These protesters divide, threaten, accuse, vilify and create havoc and social chaos. Their self-aggrandizement and victimization is pathological. They pose a threat to real victims everywhere. The real puzzle is how these students and students like them have kept the country in such a frenzy of fear. They are kin to the accusers of the Salem Witch Trials. That sad era in our country ended eventually and so will this era. The sooner the better. Can’t wait until the adults at the Universities take control again.

    • http://www.artspace.com/magazine/interviews_features/lists/the-10-worst-ways-to-die-in-a-hieronymous-bosch-painting-53872 Hieronymus Machine

      Because intersectionality. Try to keep up.

      • 1Gandydancer

        Unintelligible. Because stupidity?

    • Sin8a

      it’s the same everywhere.. these days everybody cries out racist, islamophobe at every two words.. make me want to vomit.. what about racism against white.. personnly im against stupidity .. but it seems universal these days.. sadly.

    • Jaylene Baca

      I am sorry to say that not all students attending Yale are
      “privileged” and “not in any way marginalized nor
      victimized”. As a supporter of the students who have come from backgrounds
      such as the Bronx or Indian reservations such as Santo Domingo Pueblo, I can
      say that many of the “privileged” students protesting have worked
      hard and struggled through economic and cultural disadvantages in order to
      continue to face stigmas in a “prestigious” collegiate environment
      such as Yale. I am speaking for those students that rely on scholarships like
      the Gates Millennium to help pay for their college education because otherwise
      they would be living a life of deprivation. These students are only a
      “threat” because they represent change for all colored students
      across the country. They represent a new era of equality. This era may end, but
      it will be because the fight against cultural oppression will be won by those
      protesting. This is not Salem, but it is a Pueblo Revolt. These students are
      fighting for their rights to be human. I proudly support their movement in
      order to speak against those who wish to downplay the severity of these issues.
      I support their movement because I want my children to experience the same
      educational environment as a “privileged” student.

  • sweetpea

    p.s. oh, and about that “cultural appropriation” stuff. A particular person doesn’t own any particular culture. You have no right to demand that people stop “appropriating” something that you don’t own.

  • Myiq2xu

    I can’t believe that I once thought I wasn’t smart enough to go to Yale.

  • 1Gandydancer

    “…They also denounced Erika Christakis’ behavior during an open forum at the Afro-American Cultural Center Wednesday night. Students particularly disapproved of her attempt to leave the room before speaking or answering questions directed toward her, although she explained that she had a class waiting for her.”

    “attempt”? Was she restrained?

  • ajs1512

    Are we sure that Yale isn’t putting on some highly elaborate experimental theatre piece of The Crucible? The similarities are uncannily similar. The protesters are the witch accusers; Yale administration leaders are the Salem magistrates; the Christakises are the Proctors. Hysteria, baseless accusations, emotionally charged rhetoric – history does indeed seem to repeat itself.

  • marcedward

    If you cannot deal with a Halloween costume, you lack the maturity to be in higher education. I thought Yale was selective in it’s admissions, judging by the words and actions of some students, that is clearly not the case.