This article has been revised to reflect the version that appeared in print on Jan. 26.

Over the past week, Yale has seen a flurry of criminal and law enforcement activity on campus.

On Jan. 15, Michael Cruciger ’15 had his laptop stolen from his Trumbull College common room in entryway J. Another student in the same entryway reported his wallet missing, and Axell Meza ’16 said an unknown man entered his common room claiming to be looking for “Josh.” On the same night, Kartik Srivastava ’17 said that while he was sleeping, his wallet was taken from a desk no less than a foot from his person, and his suitemate’s checkbook was taken. Transactions had been made on Srivastava’s debit card, and his suitemate’s checks had been cashed, he said.

Several days later, laptops and an iPad were stolen from a suite in Lanman-Wright Hall, the freshman residence for Berkeley and Pierson colleges.

Then, on Saturday afternoon, another pair of students in Trumbull encountered an intruder in their suite. Although the Yale Police Department reported that they had arrested a suspect in connection with the Saturday afternoon intruder in the Trumbull College suite, they initially targeted the wrong individual. Later that day, Tahj Blow ’16, son of New York Times columnist Charles Blow, was confronted at gunpoint by a YPD officer because he allegedly matched the description of the suspect, according to Charles Blow’s Twitter page. Tahj Blow declined to comment, and Charles Blow could not be reached for comment.

“Entryway doors should not be propped or have the lock taped over. These are basic issues that every student knows and, frankly, that most ignore,” Yale College Dean Jonathan Holloway said in an email. “We need to do better on this issue. Students should not hesitate to call the YPD or campus security if they are uncertain about individuals in their courtyards, entryways or hallways.”

Trumbull Master Margaret Clark said she had not previously encountered similar levels of criminal activity since assuming the mastership in 2013. Clark added that she would be visiting individual Trumbull suites Saturday evening to discuss the importance of campus safety with students and ensure that no hangers are being used to prop open doors.

The suspect had entered the suite of Nicholas Goel ’16 and Ian Gonzalez ’16, a former copy editor for the News. Goel said he was sitting in his common room Saturday afternoon when a man he had never before seen entered his bedroom. He and his suitemate confronted the man. The intruder said he was looking for a friend and then immediately walked out.

“We yelled at him, and I think it scared him off,” Goel said. “He left mumbling, pretty flustered and pretending to be on the phone.”

Gonzalez said they immediately called the police, and within five minutes, they saw a police presence on Elm Street looking for the intruder.

According to an email sent to the Trumbull community by Clark, the intruder had fled the residential college and, following behind some other students, entered Berkeley College.

Both Gonzalez and Goel said the description of the man who entered Meza’s suite given to police authorities last week matched the description of the man they encountered Saturday evening.

“Given that the previous incidents were also in this entryway both directly above our suite and across from our suite on the same floor, and that this man matched the description from the guys in the suite across from us … I’m confident it was the same person,” he said.

Clark said that she, along with Trumbull Dean Jasmina Beširevic-Regan, commended the students for their quick actions. She said the actions “almost certainly prevented thefts.” She also thanked the YPD for their quick responses in both cases.

A few days earlier, on Thursday, Pierson College freshman counselor Lindsey Hiebert ’15 sent an email to freshmen in her college informing them of a robbery that had occurred that afternoon in a Lanman-Wright Hall room.

Upon returning to the room, three freshmen discovered that all three of their laptops had been stolen, along with an iPad and a backpack, though other objects in the room, including a fourth laptop and a wallet, were not stolen.

“All of the doors on the floor are open so it’s surprising that they only came in ours,” said Neema Githere ’18, who had her laptop stolen. “What’s really surprising is that they took my phone charger and notebooks out of my backpack before taking it.”

The theft was immediately reported to Yale Security, which then referred the students to the YPD. The case is still open.

The students were informed that Yale Security would check the swipe lock on the entryway in order to determine who came into the building within the time frame. However, in a Friday email to the News, University Spokesperson Tom Conroy said that no leads had developed in the case.

  • aaleli

    Will it be divulged how this guy was getting in multiple times?

    “the intruder had fled the residential college and, following behind some other students, entered Berkeley”-

    That sentence leads me to believe no one questioned the guy- because they did not want to appear to be “racist”.

    • breakingbad23

      He was getting in from the genius students who are afraid of being called “racists” because they have the audacity to question someone walking through the gates without an university ID. Btw, try locking your dorm rooms sometime so they can’t just walk in….

      • sean601

        So you’ve clearly never been to college. Don’t worry things will pick up for you.

        • oldredleg

          “So you’ve clearly never been to college”

          You are using the pathetic “boys (or in this case – college students) will be boys” excuse for the irresponsible security behavior of these students. One can only hope that a few of them will mature enough to take personal security seriously before they get into more dangerous trouble.

      • Nishi

        I think you didn’t read the whole article.
        The students DID confront the burglar.

        • breakingbad23

          I think you didn’t read his comment, he said “Will it be divulged how this guy was getting in multiple times?” . He was getting in by piggy backing off of students who didn’t challenge an unknown person entering behind them at their gate. God job to the students who did decide to finally confront him after multiple burglaries over the course of weeks.

    • Hugh Jaynus

      I don’t think that the officer who immediately pointed a gun at Mr. Blow’s son was very worried about being called a racist. I would tend to think that this is the greater injustice. Yet you, and others posting, seem to be more concerned about some black man somewhere not being harassed. I understand that the white/black ratio is probably pretty wide at Yale, and in this unique situation the police would have to consider any black male, but immediately pointing a loaded gun at a man for no other reason than he is black, and not short, seems a little too much. For those few seconds (with Mr. Blow’s son), his life depended on that officer’s finger not jerking. How would you feel if that were your son? (I refer to Charles Blow’s son, who had nothing to do with the burglaries but was made to lay face down on the concrete at gunpoint after walking out of the Yale library, even though he totally and immediately complied with the officer’s commands.)

      p.s. And let us all not forget that the suspect was not wanted for murder or any physically violent act. He’d encountered several people, but didn’t physically threaten any of them (unless I misunderstood something). So the officer had no reason to immediately threaten this man’s life in that way; before he even knew if this was the right man or not….and it WASN’T.

      • Spazzmatic

        Mr. Jaynus,

        A couple things you are leaving out, based on other news reports. First off, the police were in a more “hot pursuit” type situation when they confronted Mr Blow, the crime ( aggravated burglary – a first degree felony in most states, same as murder) is very serious, not to mention there had been a rash of similar crimes in the same building. Based on another news report there was way more than just a “tall black male” given as a description. They described his jacket (black) and hat (red & white). So we have a police officer seeing a guy in the area within a few minutes of the crime occurring, matching the description on at least 4 points, aggressively stopping him. We only have the very biased report from Mr Blow as to wether or not his son was running, or ignored the police verbal commands at first…. two sides to every story.

        So the officer confirms the description with another officer, gets his name just in case he was wrong and sends him on his way unharmed. Sounds to me like it’s exactly what police are supposed to do. If Mr Blow’s son was the victim of a crime, I’m sure he would expect the police to stop anybody in the immediate are that fit the description of a suspect. That’s how people get arrested and held accountable in the real world. 🙂

        • biznesschic

          Still no excuse for the gun, on a description of a tall black male. If the report was for a tall white male, would you feel comfortable that every tall white male in that area was made to lay on the ground with a gun pointed at his head?

          • GiftedPrude

            This is how “unarmed” black men get shot and killed. The moment you’re quick to pull a gun, you become twitchy, “itching” to use it. Running down on someone, and drawing your weapon is poor police training. It shows cowardice as you’re relying on your weapon for power. Chase after the suspect, and sternly tell them to stop; identifying yourself as campus police in the event it’s dark and the individual cannot see your uniform and badge. After you get the person’s attention, you approach, hand on your firearm. You show “fear” when you chase after a “suspect” guns drawn and you don’t know if this “suspect” is a “suspect” or someone just minding his business. Trigger happy, poorly trained cops are quick to pull trigger, resulting in unarmed citizens being shot and killed. Sad story. This person was a “suspect” in an armed robbery; save that shit for violent offenders and terrorist. Send all these twitchy, trigger happy “mall cops” to Iraq, show them how to man up and be courageous. Takes a real coward to pull a gun on an unarmed suspect.

        • sean601

          “aggravated burglary – a first degree felony in most states, same as murder)”
          being the same level of offense doesn’t mean police need to respond with violence. Were police running around waving guns when they arrested Bernie Madoff for 11 felonies (same as murdering 11 people, by your logic)?

          • Andrew Jones

            Madoff was white and stole billions- important difference-

    • http://www.entelo.com/ John McGrath

      You’re just making this up. Blow’s son had a gun pulled on him for no reason, with certainly. What you’ve been “lead to believe” is pure conjecture.

    • ethanjrt

      Wow… projecting much?

  • rick131

    Why is crime spiraling out of control here?

    • eastrock

      Because cops can’t stop anybody that looks out of place any more unless they are white. If they do they may face federal prosecution by Eric holder and obama.

      • tasteless chap

        Grow up.

      • sean601

        Nope. The problem isn’t the stopping, it is the gun pointing. The cop was looking for a petty criminal not Bonnie & Clyde.

        • breakingbad23

          Burglary is “petty”? I’m pretty sure it’s a felony anywhere you go. Then again, I’m no college educated know it all like you.

        • Spazzmatic

          Entering an occupied home to commit a theft offense is a felony, aggravated burglary. Typically the reason it’s such a high level crime (same as murder) is the burglar usually attacks the resident.

          • sean601

            Most burglaries do not involve the criminal attacking the occupant. And this was a criminal walking through a dorm and stealing people’s things that were unattended. The criminal is a piece of crap and should be punished, but you are taking a giant illogical leap to assume any violence on the criminals part.

        • Spazzmatic

          2ND DEGREE BURGLARY

          A person commits this crime by either:

          2. entering or remaining unlawfully in a dwelling with intent to commit a crime, while someone other than a participant in the crime is in the dwelling.

          This is a class C felony.

          • http://www.entelo.com/ John McGrath

            A class C felony which the kid did not commit.

      • Hugh Jaynus

        Did you not read the Charles Blow column? The police had a young innocent black man face down on the concrete at gunpoint for fitting the most vague of descriptions (a tall African-American male). This seems to suggest the very opposite of your point.

        • Esther Clark

          exactly. perhaps if they weren’t pulling guns on random black students but looking for criminals they would have caught him sooner

        • jep07

          eastrock’s been listening to Rush. Rush has been listening to Luntz. Luntz twists everything around to “the very opposite” and ignoramii like eastrock run with it. You can watch these twisted memes work their way up the webclick ladder, and eventually they become a FOX news lie.

      • renatastar

        Oh! You, poor martyrs, victims of relentless black racism…. Cry me a river, eastrock

  • GBC

    Which does greater harm to campus safety and security: the Trumbull thefts, or the threat of near-random questioning at gunpoint of any students who fit the description of “a tall African-American man”? The YPD should not feel comfortable accosting (least of all at gunpoint) Yale students for being young and black.

    https://twitter.com/CharlesMBlow/status/559140207325618179

    • Joseph Exchequer Ohmann

      Is Charles Blow , ( The Yale student’s dad who was mistaken for being an intruder at a dorm)
      Is he a Yale grad ?

      • Maffd

        no but hes an Op-ed columnist for the New York Times, not someone Yale wants to upset…

        • Joseph Exchequer Ohmann

          True. The press is a very important and influential entity , something big corps and unions usually have in their pockets.
          – Seeing as their are a few Yale Grads in positions at the NY Times I doubt that they fear it all that much , maybe Rev.Al Sharpton coming to town again , most NH activists are very bought down into subservience –
          I believe that Yale is more afraid of publishing the name of the suspect , not just a homeless local , but another patronage drop via the Law School or City Hall

          • Theuresa Maven

            First, there were the complaints about affirmative action; now, the veiled comments regarding power, patronage, and Al Sharpton. The irony here, is that most students availing themselves of those perks in American colleges, are not even from this country. And what are you even bringing this stuff up for? It is about another innocent young man being wrongly held at gun point, without probable cause, and apparently, without apology.

      • eastrock

        Grambling

        • Theuresa Maven

          Magna cum laude.

      • emmettgrogan

        Why does that matter?

    • Guest
    • aaleli

      I seriously doubt they feel “comfortable”. What tune would you be singing if your son was shot by an intruder? And statistically the likelihood of a black male (Yale student or not) being shot by another black male far exceeds the likelihood of being shot by the police.
      There may be voices pushing a different narrative, but the facts and stats are the facts and stats. It is not the fault of the police that the chem major fits the description.

      • Esther Clark

        if the intruder had been white, would the police have pulled a gun on every white male student on campus, demanding ID?

        • Spazzmatic

          Maybe if they were also wearing the same clothing as described to them by the crime victim, like Mr Blow apparently was.

          • biznesschic

            Mr Blow was NOT wearing the same type of clothing. His black skin was enough.

          • math major

            so maybe like half the student population of yale instead of the whole student population

        • emmettgrogan

          They would probably like to.

      • Guest

        Statistically the likelihood of a white male (Yale student or not) being shot by another white male far exceeds the likelihood of being shot by the police, too. Think of it this way: statistically the likelihood of an American being shot by another American far exceeds the likelihood of an American being the victim of an Islamic terrorist attack. Does that mean there isn’t a problem with Islamic terrorism?

    • Spazzmatic

      Does it matter to you at all that the crime had just occurred, he was nearby, they had a clothing description also that he matched? Should they have just said, well, I can tell by looking at him that he’s leaving the library, is a great student and his father is a very wealthy person who also holds a position of some power…maybe we should stop some other guy leaving the area, matching the physical description and wearing the same clothes that were described to us. Who cares about the crime victims, we don’t wanna hurt anybody’s feelings.

      • emmettgrogan

        I think you had better talk with New York Times columnists, other then Tom Friedman, married to a very, very wealthy person, I doubt they would agree that being a New York Times columnist, while being prestigious, does not automatically propel you into the ranks of “a very wealthy person”. Study up before you write, please.

      • danny from saipanny

        It’s completely fine for the cop to stop him and question him. I think everyone is outraged because he pointed a gun at him. Crime victims had property stolen (I’ve been robbed before and it sucks) but they weren’t hurt in any way.

      • B.Murphy-Bridge

        ” they had a clothing description that matched”

        Really? because he was wearing shoes and a jacket? I’d like to see your source of the above quote please.

      • Theuresa Maven

        In most cases, the crime victims will (hopefully) recover financially through some form of insurance, which is what I did when I was robbed at college (the perp was a preacher’s kid with whom we were all friendly, and had robbed me of a birthday present — three days before my birthday). The students will be wiser, slightly less trusting, and have learned to protect their valuables better. This incident regarding Mr. Blow however, has already garnered as much press as when the Morningside Heights store employee falsely accused Forest Whittaker of shoplifting, went through his pockets, and then dismissed him after finding only his rather hefty wallet. As in the incident with Mr. Whittaker, the store minimized the incident, even though this type of event happens there fairly often, where black Columbia students, and other neighborhood residents, are often wrongly accused of shoplifting, and I would not be at all surprised to later find out that members of YPD have also wrongly drawn their firearms on other “usual suspects,” who just happen to fit the description.

  • joey00

    Is the suspect being held at the Yale Police Station or the New Haven Police Station ?
    What is the bond ? Charges ? Maybe they took him or her to YPI..

  • lol

    “He was a tall African-American man, so I’m confident it’s the same person from last week,” he said.

    Excellent police work!

    • truth seeker

      Just to clarify, it was one of the students who said that, not a police officer.

      • lol

        Right. Quite an ambiguous pronoun, even after the edits.

  • warsaw

    Lock all the gates to Yale. Students are endangered. Campus police are carrying guns. ID’s are not visible to everyone. The criminals look like the students. The students look like the criminals. Lock the students in.

  • danny from saipanny

    The cop could have had his own hand on his pistol, holstered, as long as he saw the boy’s hands. There was no need to point a gun at him. At worst, he could’ve pointed the gun at the ground and asked him to lay down to get cuffed. What makes me irritated is that police point guns at people who are doing nothing wrong. That should not be the default setting. A gun should only be pointed with *probable cause* and in this case, suspicion of *nonviolent* burglary is *not* adequate…

    • Spazzmatic

      You are getting one side of the story here sir. It is appropriate to point your weapon at a suspected felon leaving the scene of a crime immediately after it occurred. But, I agree that if he didn’t run or reach around when you stopped to talk to him, no need to draw a weapon. Of course we are only hearing from his anti-cop dad, so he might’ve ignored the cop at first, or even ran away.

      • Peter Lipow

        See the above comment about whether it’s appropriate to point a gun for this type of crime. And if he ran away, what then would be the reason for pointing a gun, to shoot him in the back?

        • Alison Scott

          1985 Supreme Court ruling says shooting a fleeing burglar in the back is illegal. Doesn’t stop ’em though.

      • emmettgrogan

        “His anti-cop Dad”? What? Better read up on New York Times columnist Charles Blow Spazzmatic, you are displaying a severe information deficit..

      • danny from saipanny

        The crime was burglary and no one, repeat, no one, reported seeing any kind of weapon or any violence or even threats of violence!

        Anti-cop? Talk about bias! How would you feel if your son had a gun pointed at him for no good reason? Just because he looks black? I’m a white guy, btw, with two kids, so maybe that’s what pisses me off the most.

      • Theuresa Maven

        While Charles Blow is obviously not very happy with the YPD officer who held a gun on his innocent, and unarmed, son, Charles Blow has never given anyone, through either word or deed, that he is anti-cop. When commenting on police matters on CNN, Charles Blow has often stated that he has had “the talk” with his sons, which is why (I suspect) Tahj Blow had the good sense not to challenge the YPD officer holding a gun on him, and while his son is still alive to tell the tale.

    • P. Jensen

      You are correct, As a former Police Officer, I can tell you that proper police behavior, assuming the officer was worried the person “may” be dangerous was for him to perhaps place his hands on his weapon while still holstered and direct the individual to stop, raise his hands, etc… Pulling a gun out and running after an individual who has no apparent weapon and who is not attempting to flee is not how one is trained… This is how many accidental shootings happen to miss identified individuals and innocent by standers…

      • You’re Not Relevant, Either

        …and this is the problem with Rent-a-cops having Deadly Force. Yale has some serious re-thinking to be done.

    • Andrew Jones

      Its just terrible, incompetent and dangerous policing, period. With record low violent crime, just what the hell is going on with law enforcement? their job is to keep peace and bring suspects to trial, not summarily execute people for allegedly stealing electronics.

      • SeenABitOfLife

        And your expertise on police competency flows from what experience?

        • Andrew Jones

          I’ve known some great cops, undercover narcotics guy, SWAT team- People who ACTUALLY risked their lives on a daily basis, they weren’t chasing down ipad thieves with their weapons drawn. I’ve heard on MANY occasions “I don’t draw my weapon on someone unless there is a HIGH likelihood I’m going to use it.” The fact that you think an electronics theft warrants use of deadly force is asinine.

  • http://lowereastsmile.com/ smile from The Lower East Side

    From the article:
    “Later that day, Tahj Blow ’16, son of New York Times columnist Charles Blow, was confronted at gunpoint by a YPD officer because he allegedly matched the description of the suspect… Tahj Blow declined to comment, and Charles Blow could not be reached for comment.”

    Did anyone bother to reach out to the Yale PD for comment? If not, that’s pretty shoddy journalism; was nothing learned from the Rolling Stone campus rape story debacle? — smile

    • Mike C. Miller
      • http://lowereastsmile.com/ smile from The Lower East Side

        That’s the article that brought me to this one, and it also lacks a comment from the YPD. However, while Mr. Blow is a journalist, the NY Times column linked isn’t reporting, it is an op-ed piece, clearly marked as such, so I wouldn’t expect it to have comments from anyone other than the author — smile

    • btmc

      Go read the article on that incident. There’s a whole piece dedicated to it.

      • Theuresa Maven

        … And since Charles Blow is a regular commentator on CNN regarding these kinds of incidents, I seriously doubt that this will be the last that YPD will hear about this matter.

      • http://lowereastsmile.com/ smile from The Lower East Side

        Do you have a link to said article? Even if there is a whole other article dedicated to this incident, it doesn’t excuse the lack of due diligence here. In fact, after reviewing the article here again, I realized that it contradicts itself: while the headline reads “…YPD arrests intruder,” the article doesn’t mention anything about an arrest. In fact, the last two paragraphs state:

        “The case is still open… However, in a Friday email to the News, University Spokesperson Tom Conroy said that no leads had developed in the case.”

        I’m still interested in hearing what the YPD has to say about this — smile

        • BetsyQRoss

          From my interpretation of the article:
          The email to the News was sent Friday. The suspect was arrested Saturday afternoon, after a burglary in Trumbull, and after initially targeting Charles Blows’ son,.
          Granted, the article isn’t particularly clear.

          • http://lowereastsmile.com/ smile from The Lower East Side

            That’s not an interpretation of the article, that’s your supposition of what happened later. Also, if an arrest was made, why not name the suspect? — smile

  • LocallyGrown

    News flash! “Petty theft” suspects are known to be armed. The officer was doing his JOB. I smell privilege here, not racism. So- if Yale students want this to not happen again?

    “‘Entryway doors should not be propped or have the lock taped over. These are basic issues that every student knows and, frankly, that most ignore,’ Yale College Dean Jonathan Holloway said in an email.

    Trumbull Master Margaret Clark said she had not previously encountered similar levels of criminal activity since assuming the mastership in 2013. Clark added that she would be visiting individual Trumbull suites Saturday evening to discuss the importance of campus safety with students and ensure that no hangers are being used to prop open doors.”

    • Alison Scott

      Petty theft suspects are known to be armed? What the eff does that mean? Ironically, violent crime on Yale has mostly been committed by Yale students or faculty members. This was suspected petty larceny at most.

      • Andrew Jones

        It means the commenter chooses to believe whatever fantasy comports to their personal biases.

    • Dustin Neumann

      By definition being armed during a crime is a felony. So NO “petty thief” is EVER armed .Or by definition they are not “petty”

    • LawMom3

      Having represented hundreds, perhaps thousands of petty thieves in almost 30 years of law practice I can tell you from personal experience that petty thieves are almost never armed. They may be idiots, but the vast majority understand that being armed while carrying out petty thievery is a guarantee of felony charges and jail time. You don’t know what you’re talking about.

      • SeenABitOfLife

        You’d bet your life that a petty thief is unarmed?

        • Andrew Jones

          ….Better have your gun drawn and aimed- even if your “petty thief” is actually a kid leaving the library. Really like pointing that gun at people, huh?

    • Lunico

      I think you need to evaluate your “news” source.

      • LocallyGrown

        The quote is from this very article which you apparently never actually read 🙁

  • emmettgrogan

    What was “the suspect/intruder” that Mr. Goel and Mr Gonzalez “confronted and Scared off” Saturday afternoon wearing? What was the “suspect” wearing? This story is so larded with misdirection and obfuscation as to be nearly valueless. Please get an Editor.

  • Ula Falar

    Where’s the suspect’s picture? They usually show it when the suspect is…oh, forget it. SMH.

  • Rob Waldeck

    Police wouldn’t need guns if we didn’t live in the most personally-armed country in history.

    • You’re Not Relevant, Either

      The personal arming has nothing to do with it.

      • pattreid

        It has everything to do with it. The cops are assuming everyone is armed whether they are or not. If you don’t think that increases the likelihood that they will raise their level of force, you’re daft.

        • You’re Not Relevant, Either

          Lawful carry is NOT what the police are dealing with–it is the criminals. So no, personal arming has nothing to do with it.

          • Andrew Jones

            Ideology trumps reality again- For example that couple that killed those cops in vegas purchased their weapons legally (she had no previous record).

          • You’re Not Relevant, Either

            Ideology is a problem for you, isn’t it? Sure, there are lawfully purchased guns used in crime. But MOST by a HUGE MARGIN are unlawful ones. Look it up.

          • Andrew Jones

            If you don’t want crimes committed with guns then you should be in favor of gun control like a universal background check, a does a majority of the NRA’s own membership. http://www.dnainfo.com/chicago/20140528/chicago/majority-of-illegally-owned-guns-first-bought-out-of-state-cops-mayor

          • pattreid

            It is lawful for everyone and his brother to carry. No background checks in far too many arenas. THATs what the police are dealing with. That’s what the rest of us are dealing with. That, and the fact that “responsible gun owners’ are only that until they aren’t. All you have to do is look at all the kids gettting their hands on loaded guns, kill their parents, or sibs or classmates. That’s what we’re all dealing with. We don’t call people gun nutters for nothing.

      • Betty

        I think we forget that people who are trained with weapons on a daily basis, be it the army or police….experience a level of aggression and anticipation. It gets to the point where you’re expecting something bad to occur. But nothing happens, isn’t it conceivable that you actually start looking for trouble….boredom sets in, you might want some action.

        • You’re Not Relevant, Either

          That shouldn’t happen with properly trained cops. Most cops never fire the weapons in their entire careers.

    • Obsidian71

      The arms predate the police. Thank you

    • What’s Next

      Then we could have more Renisha McBrides shot in the face and killed before the door was even open. Or the Solider who was shot by his wife trying to surprise her with breakfast.

      • Peter Lipow

        Or the woman in Idaho who was killed by her 2 year old child (testosterone male naturally) with the gun, loaded, not locked, legal in her purse

    • DerpDerpDerp

      Actually, Rob, the playing field would be even if all citizens were allowed to pack heat. Then our peace-keepers would think twice about drawing their weapon on anybody.

      • HankMurphy2021

        Yes, because when police are more afraid they will -stop- drawing their guns right? smh..

  • You’re Not Relevant, Either

    So now we have college rent-a-cops brandishing .45s at “suspects” of petty theft? I thought New Haven was in the settled East Coast–not the Wild West.

    • MNHoot

      “The Yale Police Department has 87 sworn police officers with full powers of law enforcement and arrest.”-Yale website

      “The suspect, who was seen fleeing Trumbull College, was arrested shortly thereafter in Berkeley College (a residential college adjacent to Trumbull College) and will be charged with felony burglaries.”-New Haven Independent(emphasis mine)

      So how would you approach a felony suspect if you were a cop?

      • What’s Next

        Well there are a lot of them on Wall Street so how do you approach them?

        • MNHoot

          For those, I’ve heard a cross and a necklace of garlic offer some protection.

        • Betty

          Well said, Barbara! I’m with you all the way.

      • Andrew Jones

        how to approach a suspected campus burglar? hmmmm. prepared to shoot him or her of course. far better to “accidentally” murder a student than a cop risk getting shot with an unseen, likely nonexistent gun. after all, we’re talking about a nonviolent offense on a campus full of very young inexperienced people and this is the safest time to be a police officer in a century. You wouldn’t want to stupidly assume that cops behave as brave, levelheaded, highly trained peace officers. Why deal with the hassle of a trial and evidence when any problem can be solved by creating a corpse?

        • MNHoot

          I think you overestimate the risk to Blow and underestimate the chance that someone on a burglary spree might be dangerous. Blow probably had a greater chance of getting hit by a car on the way back to his dorm than that officer accidentally shooting him.

        • SeenABitOfLife
          • Andrew Jones

            So by posting this terrible thing that happened, you infer what, exactly? That every interaction with police should take place at the end of a barrel?

      • pattreid

        I guess that would depend on whether the suspect were an unarmed black kid or a raving mad white woman shooting things up. *snark*

      • You’re Not Relevant, Either

        He was only a “suspect” because he was Walking While Black.

      • You’re Not Relevant, Either

        If you can find a single incident of this same type, in the past 5 years, with a white student, I’d be impressed. But I bet there isn’t one.

      • LocallyGrown

        Yale University police will have to approach Yale students with legal disclaimers from now on, it looks like…

      • You’re Not Relevant, Either

        OK semantics. Good catch. Where was there a report that he was “”armed and dangerous” or something? Nowhere. But he was black. And walking across Yale. That’s got to count for something.

  • elmcityyalie

    Entering a dorm room is like entering someone’s home. It’s burglary. Burglary at night makes it a felony in Connecticut. It was not just petty theft

    • Alison Scott

      Is 1700 night time now?

      • Barryfromkenya

        Does time of day really matter, legally?

        • Guest

          yes it does

        • elmcityyalie

          yes it does

      • elmcityyalie

        yes actually.. sunset was at 445pm. Would you like the link to the national weather information on the sunset?

        “Sec. 53a-100. Definitions. (a) The following definitions are applicable to this part: (1) “Building” in addition to its ordinary meaning, includes any watercraft, aircraft, trailer, sleeping car, railroad car or other structure or vehicle or any building with a valid certificate of occupancy. Where a building consists of separate units, such as, but not limited to separate apartments, offices or rented rooms, any unit not occupied by the actor is, in addition to being a part of such building, a separate building; (2) “dwelling” means a building which is usually occupied by a person lodging therein at night, whether or not a person is actually present; (3) “night” means the period between thirty minutes after sunset and thirty minutes before sunrise.”

        • You’re Not Relevant, Either

          So then it wasnt’ night. 30 minutes after sunset is still day–night starts after 30 and we have sunset 445 and crime at 500? that’s day.

      • Guest

        yes it is.. the sunset was 445pm..

        Sec. 53a-100. Definitions. (a) The following definitions are applicable to this part: (1) “Building” in addition to its ordinary meaning, includes any watercraft, aircraft, trailer, sleeping car, railroad car or other structure or vehicle or any building with a valid certificate of occupancy. Where a building consists of separate units, such as, but not limited to separate apartments, offices or rented rooms, any unit not occupied by the actor is, in addition to being a part of such building, a separate building; (2) “dwelling” means a building which is usually occupied by a person lodging therein at night, whether or not a person is actually present; (3) “night” means the period between thirty minutes after sunset and thirty minutes before sunrise.

  • michaeljw

    My son’s macbook and wallet were stolen from his suite (in Bingham), while he was there, which cost me a lot of money. I am not sympathetic to people who breaking and entering into private residences despite all the rhetoric here. It seems petty crime is fairly rife at Yale and it takes an incident like this to draw attention to it!

  • ChooseToSuceed

    Library Visit, Then Held at Gunpoint
    Charles Blow: At Yale, the Police Detained My Son

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/26/opinion/charles-blow-at-yale-the-police-detained-my-son.html

  • pattreid

    Hmmmm, no mention of the race of the suspect that was actually the thief. Must have been white.

  • IKB

    This “prop the door open” is not new. I am sure that some interlock system can be installed that turns on a camera when people enter and then if the door is open longer than X time an alarm is sounded.

    • Another Mike

      The other possibility is tailgating. If somebody looks like they could be a student, and they appear to be confidently entering the building, another student will let them follow them into the building.

  • LocallyGrown

    Does anyone know the ratio of how often African American males have guns pointed at them by white police officer versus how often guns are pointed at them by other African American males? I know there’s more likely to be a pleasant financial settlement resulting from the former than the latter 🙂

    • BigBill

      Your comparison insults the police. Police officers are professionals and are expected to conduct themselves with high standards, set in this case by Yale University. They are not common thugs.

      • larry

        some are

      • Barryfromkenya

        I think it is exactly the opposite (your first sentence); you misunderstood his comment

      • Betty

        Really? You must be a cop. Yes, they’re supposed to conduct themselves with high standards….but then there’s reality.
        There are plenty of cops who are behind bars for crimes including corruption, drug dealing, rape, and yes – murder.

    • aaleli

      Except THIS officer was WHITE.

  • Lmaris

    No name or description of the suspect. Why? All the alleged victims are named, along with their expected graduation years, but the supposed suspect whose arrest is a public record is left unnamed?

    Smells to high heaven like the Yale press is trying to make the Yale police overreaction go away.

    • ChooseToSuceed

      No, it sounds like the suspect is white and they will NOT have that at their university. smh

      • Barryfromkenya

        Wow

    • Another Mike

      It will turn out from the booking photos that the suspect looked nothing like Tahj Blow.

  • ChooseToSuceed

    Library Visit, Then Held at Gunpoint
    Charles Blow: At Yale, the Police Detained My Son

    http://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/26/opinion/charles-blow-at-yale-the-police-detained-my-son.html

  • a_2_z

    “said Neema Githere ’18, who had her laptop stolen. “What’s really
    surprising is that they took my phone charger and notebooks out of my
    backpack before taking it.”

    I’ve got news from the real world for you, Neema – the thief wasn’t being nice and considerate and thinking of you when he left you your phone charger and class notebooks. He needed a relatively empty backpack to carry away other laptops and assorted iPads and wallets he was planning on stealing (seeing as he already had a pilfered backpack for the three laptops and an iPad that he had just stolen).

    No, that thief wasn’t going to waste any precious loot-carrying capacity with your phone charger and notebooks worth nothing on the Craigslist black market….

  • Barryfromkenya

    Do you think it might be relevant that the cop was black? Why did Blow leave that fact out of his piece?

    • http://www.redstate.com/absentee/2016/11/05/donald-trump-lies-face-episode-billion-video/ QWERTY

      No. It’s more relevant that a cop pulls a gun out on a student leaving the school library without even telling him why he’s being detained.

    • Another Mike

      Conservatives — always so obsessed with race.

      • Barryfromkenya

        You can’t constantly cry racism, and then say we are obsessed with race when we point out the fallacies. Blow made it racial.

        • Thisis2020

          Racism isn’t solely about individual beliefs or actions. It flourishes within a sophisticated system of white supremacy, which constantly reinforces ideas of black inferiority – including criminality. Black people too can internalise these problematic values. So it’s inconsequential whether or not the cop was white or black or yellow. The bigger point is that all people internalise ideas about black criminality which plays out in scenarios like this. Get clued up

          • jpat34721

            Right, because you have it all figured out.

        • Another Mike

          Charles Blow wrote about his son, not about his white son or his black son.

  • Betty

    The cop probably didn’t have to point his gun to a kid, even if a burglary was being investigated. If there’d been a question of a killer or rapist on the loose, then sure. This country’s fixation with stopping, frisking and harrassing black men, as got to STOP! It’s sickening.

    • elmcityyalie

      Then join a police force and change the system then. Make the changes from the inside

    • aaleli

      Black men have got to stop killing other black men. it’s sickening. That’s what you meant to write, right?

  • Betty

    Anyone who claims that this issue isn’t a question of race, needs to have his or her head examined. Even though slavery is officially over, Jim Crow kept the flames of hatred glowing for a long time, and it’s still not over. It just has a different look. Many KKK members and sympathizers don’t wear the usual white hoods anymore…they hold positions in government, carry briefcases, and of course – guns.

  • Joy Darby

    In our Brave New World we have the technology to monitor . . nearly everything. I am amazed that the school doesn’t have a better system of video screening. In other words, Big Brother Yale, where are you when we need you?