For over 30,000 high school students, the wait is finally over.

Yale released admissions decisions for the class of 2018 Thursday afternoon, accepting 1,935 students from an applicant pool of 30,932 — an acceptance rate of 6.26 percent. Last year, the University offered seats to more students, accepting 1,991 from a smaller pool of 29,610 applicants, making for an acceptance rate of 6.72 percent. After hovering around 7.5 percent from 2009 to 2011, Yale’s acceptance rate has now remained in the 6 percent range for three consecutive years.

This was the first year Dean Jeremiah Quinlan’s signature has appeared on Yale’s admissions letters. Quinlan succeeded Dean Jeffrey Brenzel in July 2013.

“In my first year as the admissions dean, I am inspired by Yale’s extraordinary applicant pool but also humbled by the challenging selection process we have just completed,” Quinlan said in an email.

Quinlan said Yale and its peer schools have seen application numbers rise and the applicant pool grow stronger over the past five years. This year’s group of admitted students includes more students from “virtually every underrepresented group in higher education,” he said.

Although the University could not offer seats to a large number of talented applicants, Quinlan said virtually all of these students will thrive at other selective institutions.

“Of the students offered admission, we know that those who select Yale will bring an astonishingly wide variety of talents, backgrounds, experiences and aspirations to campus this coming fall,” Quinlan said.

All Ivy League schools are obligated by the Common Ivy League Agreement to release their decisions on the same day. After seven consecutive years of record-low acceptance rates, Harvard’s acceptance rate rose slightly to 5.9 percent — a marginal change from the 5.8 percent it recorded a year earlier. Princeton’s class of 2018 was the most selective in the institution’s history at 7.28 percent, a slight drop from the 7.29 percent figure it recorded last year. Columbia University also saw a slight rise in the admit rate from a record-low 6.89 percent last year to 6.94 percent this year. But the University of Pennsylvania announced yesterday that it accepted 9.9 percent of its 35,868 applicants, a sharp decline from last year’s figure of 12.1 percent. Brown, Cornell and Dartmouth have yet to release their numbers.

“Although these fluctuations make for interesting score-keeping, they are mathematically negligible,” said Robert Morse, director of data and research at U.S. News and World Report College Rankings.

He added that although acceptance rates are factored in his organization’s well-known college rankings, Yale’s accepting 1 percent more students one year compared to another would not impact the University’s ranking.

Mark Dunn ’07, the admission office’s director of outreach and recruitment, said the office uses a number of outreach tools to recruit students from all backgrounds. Beyond social media, which has become an increasingly popular medium of communication, Dunn said the University mailed pamphlets and other information to target high-achieving students from low-income backgrounds. He added that the latest research in education policy indicates that direct mail is the most effective way of reaching such students.

For the first time, in June 2013, Yale used tailored mailing to a select group of 16,000 rising high school seniors who are members of low-income families. The mailing emphasized that households with less than $65,000 in annual income are not asked to make any parental contributions to their child’s Yale education. According to Dunn, the mailing campaign was supplemented by an email campaign and a new page on the admissions office’s website highlighting the affordability of a Yale education.

Dunn said it is too early for the office to measure the success of the new mailing initiative, adding that the office will conduct a thorough analysis of the feedback submitted by applicants, admits and eventual matriculates in the summer.

Amin Abdul-Malik Gonzalez, an associate director of the admissions office and co-director of multicultural recruitment, said the University’s success in reaching students from underrepresented backgrounds is attributable to the combined efforts of admissions staff, dedicated alumni and current Yale undergraduates. He also cited the University’s ongoing partnerships with College Horizons and QuestBridge — two organizations that support the educational ambitions of high-achieving students from low-income backgrounds — as examples of ways in which Yale is encouraging a more diverse applicant pool.

Richard Avitabile, a former admissions officer at New York University and a private college counselor, said universities’ acceptance rates are only useful in evaluating the merits of institutions when used selectively and with a long-term approach. Still, he added that he would be interested in seeing Dartmouth’s numbers because the college has seen two consecutive years of fewer applicants — an exception to the broader trend of rising application numbers across selective institutions.

Jim Patterson, associate dean of Harvard-Westlake, a private school in Los Angeles, said his students are increasingly realizing the flaws of choosing a school based on its acceptance rate or place on a college rankings list.

“Students are becoming savvier and they’re realizing that what is a good fit for one student may not be a great fit for another,” Patterson said.

Jon Reider, director of college counseling at San Francisco University High School, said these acceptance rates will continue to decline as more students realize the financial accessibility of these colleges and apply.

Patterson echoed Reider’s sentiment, adding that more international students will look to American colleges as budget cuts hurt public universities abroad, especially in Europe.

Accepted students took to social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter to share the news, posting updates rejoicing or lamenting their admissions outcomes. The popular college forum College Confidential experienced technical failures as enthusiastic students from across the globe logged on to share results and discuss the news.

“I was at home on the computer with my dad and we both jumped up when we saw the Bulldog with the congratulations,” said Thomas Pan, a high school senior from Livingston, New Jersey. Pan added that he never considered being accepted to Yale as a possibility.

Sam Cheng, a high school senior from Connecticut, said he was so excited when he read his acceptance letter that he threw the pen he was holding against the wall. Still, Cheng said he is currently deciding between Princeton and Yale.

Students have until May 1 to respond to their admissions offers.

  • rick131

    These numbers can easily be fudged by accepting more applicants early as has been the trend in most schools. Accepting a hundred more kids early will significantly drop the overall admit rate.

    • observer

      Accepting more kids early certainly drops the yield rate significantly as long as the early program is binding – as at Penn, Dartmouth or Brown – and not of the non-binding variety – as at Yale, Harvard or Princeton. It is true, statistically, that admits via non-binding early programs also matriculate at a higher rate than “regular” admits, but this is probably because they have a stronger attraction to the school in the first place, as evidenced by selecting it, against all others, for applying early.

      • rick131

        Harvard and Princeton were losing students like crazy to Yale and Columbia when they stopped early action and their admit rates rose. That is why they re instituted early action to improve their stats.

        • observer

          Harvard has never “lost students like crazy” to Yale.

  • NM

    My son with 96.1 GPA and a ACT of 35 and a load of community service. NMSF and a lot more awards got rejected from every school he applied(12 schools). He is not even crying. Please tell me how to console him and what should I do next. Any ideas

    • inycepoo

      The unfortunate thing is that your son is in good company with many, many, many other applicants who have exactly those stats, if not better. If there was nothing beyond the cookie-cutter extracurriculars, it’s understandable how he was passed over by so many schools.

      I’m hoping that he didn’t only aim for top private colleges and the Ivies. Did his state school show some love? A student like him would likely do very well at any institution. If literally every single school he applied to rejected him, there’s not much anyone can do at this point..

      • NM

        The extracurricular were not the cookie-cutter type but a genuine interest.

    • GED

      Wow! Very sorry to hear. There are a number of things to do; your choice. There is a list of colleges with openings in their class, meaning they didn’t fill up. But this won’t be available until after May 1 when the acceptance deadline occurs. Of course, there are also public colleges with rolling admissions and they might have openings. Finally, your son can take a gap year and do something interesting before college, but something that allows him to have the time to reapply next year. If you choose this approach, next time he applies, with those stats, your son really needs to break down his applications into 4 groups: 2 reach schools (not 12), 2 possible schools, 2 probable schools, and 2 for-sure schools. If you’re still shell-shocked, you’re free to include 3 schools in each category so that you have an even better chance. Determining which colleges are in which group is not always easy, but you can use the SAT or ACT 25-75% scores that one can readily find. A reach school would be in the top 25% (in other words over that middle 50% range), a for-sure school would be in the bottom 25%, and the other two categories would be in the middle. Hope this helps. Good luck in a difficult time and with a tough decision on the way to go forward.

      • NM

        He has 4.0 GPA and 35 ACT 36,36,35 and 34 score. What else the colleges want.Is it possible to get this list. Can you imagine his morale after 4 years of hard work and reputation in school

    • guest

      Be a “minority”, be the first in your family to attend college, come to this country illegally or live below the poverty level. This is the NEW bar.

      • GurlPlease

        Black and Hispanic students are severely underrepresented at Yale.
        First-generation students are severely underrepresented at Yale.
        Students on Pell Grants are severely underrepresented at Yale.

        Your comment is the OPPOSITE of reality.

        • lucydaisy

          Not true. Also, why should first generation applicants have any claim to admissions at Yale? Not sure I’m following you.

      • NM

        I am not poor, very hard working educated people not a minority but asian.If the admission officers are reading they should be ashamed ‘No School’

      • CallMeIshmael

        Bingo.

    • puffthejapanesedragon

      It’s possible that your son’s application had something “off” that raised red flags for admissions committees…hopefully, that wasn’t the case.

      • GurlPlease

        What are you doing?

        • puffthejapanesedragon

          I’m being brutally honest.

      • NM

        What does he have off. He is a National merit Semifinalist. If I tell you his community service you might faint, He has taken the most regorious courses and the school had no more course to offer him. He is a captain of team.He has wonderful recommendations.Not a single school

        • puffthejapanesedragon

          I’m suggesting that some phrase, some passage in his admissions essay could have conveyed an unintended meaning to readers. Or the tone of the admissions essay was “off” in some way.

          You’d be surprised at how often these things happen.

          • NM

            I like someone telling me than not knowing at all. Is there a way to appeal anything. He was deferred and they rejected.The admissions officer did not even let us know if he received all intent material during the huge storm of 24 feet snow in Feb 2014

        • fallingleaves

          No offense but there are so many applicants who do as much as your son and the admissions officer only do have a limited amount of space, any little mess up on the application like the tone of the essay could result in rejection. I do hope your son gets into other great colleges though.

    • Joseph Exchequer Ohmann

      Maybe references ?

    • CallMeIshmael

      The truth is that your son is better than those pukes at Yale. I despise them – they’re a bunch of lying hypocrites. If your son is a sane white middle-class kid from a public high school, he never had a shot at Yale, no matter what the merits of his application. They only take legacies, minorities, crazies, athletes and a few poor kids to make them feel better about themselves. If he had written an essay about how he is really a lesbian trapped in a man’s body, he might have had a better result. It sounds to me like he probably has too much integrity to be a stinkin’ Yalie anyway.

      • fallingleaves

        Your bitterness is very hard on the ears. If you despise them so much then maybe you should stop writing on their STUDENT newspaper. Also, this is too much of an exaggeration. There ARE “sane and white” kids who get accepted, go look at results from college confidential or something. Obviously they saw you or your child’s terrible personality and decided to reject. I’m sorry if I’m being harsh because rejection is hard but don’t take it out on the Yale students.

      • HH

        you got it brother!

      • 20155

        I’m a sane, white, middle-class kid from a public high school who was accepted to Harvard and Princeton as well as Yale when I was applying to college. There are a lot of us here.

        • lucydaisy

          You are not telling the truth, 20155

          • 20155

            But really, I am…

  • HH

    NM, Yale and all other Ivy League Schools are not for your son
    and not for my son too; they are for the highly privileged one percent who
    sends millions of dollars endowments to buy their kid’s seat. My son is a high achiever
    too, who got rejected by Yale and four other Ivy League schools. Just tell your
    son the truth and get him into genuine school that really cares about good students,
    not their bank accounts.

    • Bobby Newport

      I don’t think that statements you made are entirely accurate. Sure, it may help to have deep pockets, but usually over half of the accepted class is on some type of financial aid at these top schools. Stop whining.

    • Guest

      Delusion is not a healthy coping mechanism.

      I’m a first-generation Asian immigrant (Yale discriminates against Asians and dragons in admissions). It goes without saying that I’m not a legacy. My family (though very highly educated) is upper-middle class and did not “[send] millions of dollars [of] [endowment] to buy their kid’s seat.” After I turned 16, I spent my high school summers working my tail off at minimum wage and wrote my admissions essay about my job. I earned perfect test scores without using a single class or test-prep book.

      Yale admitted me because I’m a good student. I won’t let you tell me otherwise.

      • GurlPlease

        Puff, my friend, do you realize what you are saying? You are saying that Yale discriminates against Asians, while they accept Asians at a rate 4-5 TIMES higher than their percentage in the general population. Asians are literally the last group that can have a claim to being discriminated against in admissions.

        • undergrad_14

          Relative to the general population is a ridiculous metric, as members of different races perform differently on the primary metrics that colleges use to judge applicants.

          Compare the two metrics that are most important: SAT and GPA. The mean SAT score for Asians is 1645, compared to a 1495 across the pool. The mean GPA for Asians is a 3.26, compared to a 3.00 across the pool. Both of these are higher than any other race.

          Given those statistics, I think it would be discriminatory for Asians not to be admitted at a rate far higher than their percentage in the general population.

          Sources:

          1) http://nationsreportcard.gov/hsts_2009/course_gpa.aspx
          2) http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/research/2013/TotalGroup-2013.pdf

          edit: corrected a typo

          • Adesuyi A Leslie Ajayi

            Lets be fair and honest. The Asians score higher than other ethnicities in standardized testing but the European descendants are still the most creative people on earth in recent memory. Blacks have the least scores in standardized testing , but there is a dichotomy between “immigrant blacks” from Africa or Carribbeans and US blacks in performance. The US blacks have a worse legacy of slavery, discrimination and this is a hard generational hurdle. African blacks have less historical burden and perform very close to whites ( but their number is few, so you could debate selection pressure). The point is these ivy league schools admit students with abilities and not grades. They use interviews to differentiate a ‘coached to excel student’ from a naturally gifted too. Harvard admits students mainly “on their alleged ability to impact the world” positively. And that is the ultimate goal of any globally selective college

          • CallMeIshmael

            Not sure what you’re talking about. The Ivies don’t require an admissions interview and claim that the alumni interviews they do provide (if a candidate chooses) don’t count in the admissions process.

          • yalengineer

            As an alumni interviewer, I disagree.

          • yalengineer

            While I agree with you that GurlPlease is being naive in their statement, I wouldn’t say that numbers completely tell the story behind a candidate.

        • fallingleaves

          Just because the rate is higher doesn’t mean that Yale (Or any other selective college) doesn’t discriminate against Asians. The rate is higher because so many Asians are overqualified(plus there are a lot of applications from them). Ask anyone, being Asian is usually a disadvantage when applying to these selective colleges.

    • anonymous

      Hi HH,

      I am so sorry your son was rejected. Truly, and I hope he can find another college that is an excellent fit for him. However, as a current Yale student on the average financial aid package, I can promise you our school has more academic, socio-economic, geographic, extracurricular, and personality diversity than I ever imagined. I am sure your son is hard-working and smart. Sadly, most of the 30,000 applicants also fit that description, otherwise they wouldn’t be applying to Yale. It’s intensely competitive, and I’m sure 75% or more of applicants have the grades to get in. Yale just can’t admit them all. Yale is an imperfect place, like any institution, but reducing it down to just caring about bank accounts is completely incorrect. A majority of these students are on FA, we’re not buying seats. And those students who aren’t on FA are also hugely qualified, so it’s not as if they are B students who are squeezing into Yale because of money.

      I know how frustrating the college application process can be, and I hope it all works out well for your son.

      • GurlPlease

        Wow, oh my gosh, this is so crazy. This is harmful. Do you realize that only 54% of Yale is on financial aid? (Coming from financial aid statistics here: http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/yale-university-1426) That is absolutely CRAZY! That means that 46% of students are paying for all of the expenses associated with Yale. If they are not on aid, then they are coming from families with ridiculously huge incomes, like upwards of $180,000/$200,000 a year at least. It is not at all real life that half of a school could come from families with that level of wealth. The median family income in America is four times less than that–four times! Also, please keep in mind, that if you are on the “average financial aid package” at Yale, then you are significantly more wealthy than the average American. I would guess that you probably come from a family that makes around $100,000/$120,000 a year. Assuming that the community you come from also is of people with similar financial backgrounds, I don’t think that your perspective here is meaningful: “I can promise you our school has more academic, socio-economic, geographic, extracurricular, and personality diversity than I ever imagined”.

        • dcheretic

          Gurl Please! Please Gurl!

          I, too, attended Yale on 100% financial aid and can attest to the attributes of its generous financial aid policies. I was the first person in my family to attend college and was able to do so even after a childhood marked by instability and turmoil. Yale offered a meretricious opportunity and I took it, as did many classmates from modest circumstances.

          Yale is not reflective of average America because it is a haven for intellectual elites. Americans as a whole, sadly, have never been known for being intellectually keen. Ours is a nation that prizes football over science, beauty pageants over Shakespeare. People who are smart and apply themselves in school tend to be more successful in the workplace than people of average intelligence and a lack of self-discipline. Far too many American youths spend their high school years boozin’ and ballin’ and then want to spend their adulthoods resentful of what others have. And, of course, there are those who have never been dealt a fair hand in life and have every reason to feel resentful. Yale is not, has never been, and hopefully never will be, reflective of average America.

          Given the increasing social stratification and self-segregation of America, it is possible to claim that Yale is unusually diverse.

          DCHeretic (channeling Mommie Dearest), Class of 1995

          • NM

            I also come from a very difficult family but by being conservative and hard working collected the finances by putting kids first. We have a college degree that means our kids are at fault and don;t get admission any where as every where the seats are taken inspite of ACT 35 and 4.0 GPA and loads of other activities

          • concerned

            What you are saying DCHeretic (channeling Mommie Dearest), Class of 1995, is based heavily in myths that go well with current Yale and are of course supported by the dearth of research into socioeconomic classism. For example, only recent study has uncovered that very few lower socioeconomic individuals advance into upward mobility while most socioeconomic upper class retain their positions. It is unknown whether a Yale diploma makes a difference in the former situation, but that data could have been collected rather than leaving the presentation to individual anectdote.

            Of course, from your persepctive,
            “Far too many American youths spend their high school years boozin’ and ballin’ and then want to spend their adulthoods resentful of what others have.”

            No. Such youth from higher socioeconomic strata don’t need to spend their adulthoods resenting at all what others have because they know theirs will come from their parents. And so on.

          • ldffly

            Did you really mean a ‘meretricious opportunity?’

    • GurlPlease

      Preach, gurl.

  • puffthejapanesedragon

    Stop blaming privilege for your (and your kids’) rejections. Of course, it’s true that Yale strongly favors legacies, athletes, children of donors, etc. However, Yale still rejects far more legacies than it accepts, and Yale offers many seats to the less privileged…especially to first-generation college students.

    The harsh reality is that Yale will always reject many qualified applicants. Having the right “numbers” is simply prerequisite for admissions, and students are accepted based on a combination of luck, intangibles, and exceptional talent.

    • GurlPlease

      Uh, hail naw.
      Yale has 12% first-generation students. Do you know what percentage of students are first-generation across all colleges in the United States? 50%. That means that we have 4x less first-generation students than the normal American college. Get real, dude, Yale sucks, and the kids who get in here do come from disproportionately privileged backgrounds.
      Bah.

      • NM

        We do lot of community service in our home country to bring less privileged kids up . Never thought Yale would not see that in this dynamic child and not anyone saw it. Not a single school. the word blind has a new meaning.

      • puffthejapanesedragon

        That’s an entirely meaningless argument. See undergrad_14’s comment below; he strikes the nail on the head.

        The reality is that first-generation college students are generally much weaker applicants than students from highly educated families. If you compare the “numbers” for students admitted to Yale as first-generation students, you’ll likely find that the scores/GPAs are somewhat weaker than the average admitted student.

        Interestingly, legacy students admitted to Yale have higher scores/GPAs than the average admitted student.

    • NM

      The definition of exceptional talent, please.

      • yalengineer

        World class musician. Representative of Team USA in the IMO competition. Founder of an internationally recognized nonprofit. Olympic Gold Medalist. Your pick.

  • upshot

    More from “underrepresented groups” admitted. Translation: affirmative action and the lowering of standards for quotas remains alive and well at Yale. Which is why a Yale degree isn’t worth what it used to be. Some employers even write it off as pretty much meaningless if the graduate got in as an “underrepresented” person.

  • Patti Atwater

    Yale has a fantastic legacy. I had the great honor of working in Admissions many years ago! There are many scholarships and financial aide available! I find some of these comments uninformed and mean-spirited! Congrats to the in-coming Freshman Class!

    • NM

      We were not looking for aid. We are educated,conservative parents that belief in savings

  • HH

    Consider the following Five Tier Admission System:

    Tier I: Old & New Money Elite Group

    Tier II: Athletes Group

    Tier III: African Americans Group

    Tier IV: Other Minority Groups

    Tier V: ALL Others

    • CallMeIshmael

      This is absolutely true.

  • 1234qwer

    What else is there to say? Yale is an extremely hard school to get into – 35 ACT? 2300 SAT? National Merit Scholar? Community service? Those accomplishments are the BARE MINIMUM to even be considered for admission at a place like this as a student from an average socioeconomic background. Rejected? Should’ve done more in high school. The admissions board isn’t impressed that your son/daughter plays on the soccer time while juggling clarinet and works at the soup kitchen. Have some skill/knowledge that’s garnered accolades at the state/national level, or perform research that gets published in journal, or intern with local government to affect policies that contribute to social good. Make sure your admissions essays are phenomenal. How can anyone complain about not getting into a school like Yale based solely on factors like grades/test scores? A minute of searching on google/college forums or simply talking to a student at one of these institutions would reveal that those are hardly enough to win admission.

    • NM

      He has everything you are saying and more .Only I am not specifically writing them on this email. His research paper is already being peer reviewed.

  • AlanHouston

    Sorry HH, you have the facts wrong. African-Americans are 12% of high school graduates, but just 8% of the students at Ivy League colleges. Only two Ivy League colleges have an African-American enrollment of 12% or higher.

    In contrast, Asian-Americans are just 4% of high school graduates, but are 20% of Ivy League students. In addition, 10% to 15% of Ivy League students are foreign citizens or have dual citizenship. The majority of those students are from China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore and South Korea. Overall, almost 30% of Ivy League students are Asian.

    But, legacies remain the preferred group of applicants. They have a 30% or 40% chance of admission compared with 5% for a non-legacy at Harvard, Yale or Princeton.

    • aaleli

      Just because you’re a high school graduate does not mean you have any business at an Ivy. The percentages are irrelevant, actually.

    • 72bullldog

      I think the legacy admission rates vary from school to school. Harvard and Princeton have confirmed the 30% plus number but Yale’s Admissions department takes the trouble of sending a letter that warns the parents of legacy applicants that the admission rate for legacies is around 20%. Still a big difference from the overall admissions rate but hardly a walk in the park for a group that has already self selected with higher than average scores.

      As a side note comparison, Yale Law rates each candidate on a 1 to 4 range, but legacy applicants get an automatic point of “1” just because they are legacy. That is a huge boost in a very competitive school, but it doesn’t seem to have hurt the quality of the place.

  • AlanHouston

    Do Blacks and Hispanic students “lower standards” at Yale? The median SAT scores for Black and Hispanic students at Yale are in the 1900 to 2100 range. This is FAR higher than the median SAT scores at Yale in 1960 when the students were white anglo males, almost exclusively from wealthy families, with the majority coming from just twenty private prep schools.

    So, if you hear a 70 year old white guy ranting about “low admissions standards” at Yale, remind him that in 1960 Yale was routinely admitting white male legacies from wealthy families with SAT verbal scores of just 450 or 475. George Bush, at 560, had a VERY high SAT score for a wealthy white legacy of his generation.

  • Bud Wiser

    I’m convinced it’s all about branding — you need to define a personal brand to stand out from the crowd and get noticed. My kid went 10 for 10 at a variety of schools, from Ivies to state universities. WL at Hahvahd and UMich. Clearly set self up as someone who overcame challenges, had strong drive to succeed and will be successful in college/any endeavor. Well-written, well-supported plus requisite solid scores and grades. Boola-boola!

    • HH

      Well said Handsome Dan! Well said!! BTW, what is [ Hahvahd]?

  • Adesuyi A Leslie Ajayi

    Congrats all, choose and accept the university you attend with wisdom and guidance. i remember a few years how excited i was when my daughter received her Harvard Acceptance E- mail followed by 5 other Ivy league schools, she got into 13 schools and was only turned down by Yale. ( She says its their loss and has a T shirt which cruelly states ” Yale : Harvard for Dummies” the revenge of a 17 year old used to getting her awards and perfect grades.
    The choice final was between Harvard and Princeton, she wanted Princeton and us parents wanted Harvard. It was her grandparents who attended ancient British universities who convinced her that the Alumni network matters in life, beyond college. Another parent we met Harvard, said he too faced the problem of choice, but he told his son “that those admitted to Harvard and dont attend, spend their lives explaining why ”
    My daughter attended Harvard SEAS, and yes Harvard deflates grade in their only SB. But she is now earning her engineering doctorate at another most selective school. So , new admits talk to alumni of schools that offered you admission, and think long rage strategically. Listen to parents or grandparents too , if you are lucky to have those with strong educational backgrounds. TALK TO YOUR TEACHERS AND COUNSELORS AT SCHOOL TOO. Don’t go to a school just because your friend or girl friend is going there too. Finally, ivy league is not the be all and end all. Many of those who get into top postgraduate programs, or succeed in life, attended selective or state schools schools. Life is a marathon , not a sprint, good luck and God speed .

    • CallMeIshmael

      Judging by your profile picture, you’ve proven my point about the Ivy League’s insane obsession with demographics and the triumph of those demographics over merit in their admissions decisions.

      • uwotm8

        A single non-white person went to Harvard, therefore the Ivy League values demographics above merit? Great reasoning there, bud.

  • CallMeIshmael

    Yea, it’s a 6.26 percent admission rate overall, but for a sane, white public school kid from suburbia, it’s more like 1 percent – or less. First, they admit kids of alumni at something in excess of 20 percent (despite their lies to the contrary). Then you have to throw-in the preferred demographic kids, who are admitted with SAT scores and GPAs that would be an absolute joke for white applicants. Add on the kids who can throw a football 70 yards or row crew and the prep school crowd, also admitted at rates far, far in excess of 6.26 percent plus, a few kids who have a building on campus named after their grandfather. Then, for some bizarre reason, they seem to like the kid who writes an essay about how he/she intends to overthrow the U.S. Government or how it is unfair that society makes you choose just one gender. Finally, the few spots remaining are reserved for poor kids, so that Yale can claim to be all-so-egalitarian. The sane middle-class white kid with 2300 SATs who was Valedictorian at a public high school in the Northeast with two varsity letters? Sorry, kid – you’re not good enough for Yale. You’ve got no shot. None. Zero.

    • yalengineer

      Interviewed one such candidate. She got in.

  • Guest

    Hi NM – I am truly sorry for the disappointment and doubt your son must feel and the pain no doubt you endure as a parent wishing only happiness for her child. I hope the below helps:

    I was a college tour guide at Yale. I received many questions like yours. What does my child have to do to secure admission? What types of achievements does Yale value most? How could they not select my child – he/she has a perfect resume? Unfortunately, all of these questions fail to effectively frame the problem at hand. Similarly, this thread of comments has missed perhaps the most important differentiator of any college application. An effective application connects an applicant’s success to that of a goal school and its community.

    Attending Yale – or any top 25 college – is indeed a privilege, if not experientially then at the very least statistically. Admissions offers want to know that the individuals they select to attend have a clear understanding of how they will contribute to a school.

    As an applicant, you need to express directly, effectively and intimately why you are applying to that particular institution. Why is that school the best fit for you? What do you want to achieve and how do those goals align with the school’s academic,
    social and extracurricular offerings? What will you give back? How will you leverage your skills and talents to better a school, its community and society?

    Additionally, selective colleges also want to be selected. By the applicant! Admissions officers want to feel that, beyond being a great fit, you are likely to attend. If you don’t make the AdCom believe you will attend its school by effectively answering the questions above, then you be viewed as a wasted offer.

    I obviously have not read your sons applications and I do not underestimate the amount of energy he put in to them. However, a few facts in your/his pattern jump out as suggesting he may not have addressed the above considerations.

    First – 12 schools! Holy lord! I just applied to business school successfully and put in applications to only three schools. I applied to only thee colleges as well. I spent weeks on each application tailoring it to the specific school, learning and then articulating exactly what that school had to offer both for my benefit and its. With 12 applications to complete, I would imagine this sort of intimacy is hard to achieve.

    Second – it’s not all about your son (I don’t mean that harshly, just as fact). Asking what is wrong with his resume or pedigree suggests you are not seeing the bigger picture. Your son’s applications must speak to more than his GPA, scores, activities, etc. Otherwise, he is no more than a resume. An application must speak to the intersection of the applicant and the school.

    Lastly, I would just like to register that, in my personal experience, Yale is not some bastion of elitism. The students I met were among the most humble, curious and excited individuals I have had the privilege of knowing. I have encountered far more snobbish individuals outside of Yale. It is very easy when one feels (and perhaps has been) slighted to judge in return, but a true mark of superiority is modesty and understanding.

  • SW12345

    Hi NM – I am truly sorry for the disappointment and doubt your son must feel and the pain no doubt you endure as a parent wishing only happiness for her child. I hope the below helps:

    I was a college tour guide at Yale. I received many questions like yours. What does my child have to do to secure admission? What types of achievements does Yale value most? How could they not select my child – he/she has a perfect resume? Unfortunately, all of these questions fail to effectively frame the problem at hand. Similarly, this thread of comments has missed perhaps the most important differentiator of any college application. An effective application connects an applicant’s success to that of a goal school and its community.

    Attending Yale – or any top 25 college – is indeed a privilege, if not experientially then at the very least statistically. Admissions offers want to know that the individuals they select to attend have a clear understanding of how they will contribute to a school.

    As an applicant, you need to express directly, effectively and intimately why you are applying to that particular institution. Why is that school the best fit for you? What do you want to achieve and how do those goals align with the school’s academic,
    social and extracurricular offerings? What will you give back? How will you
    leverage your skills and talents to better a school, its community and society?

    Additionally, selective colleges also want to be selected. By the applicant! Admissions officers want to feel that, beyond being a great fit, you are likely to attend. If you don’t make the AdCom believe you will attend its school by effectively answering the questions above, then you may be viewed as a wasted offer.

    I obviously have not read your sons applications and I do not underestimate the amount of energy he put in to them. However, a few facts in your/his pattern jump out as suggesting he may not have addressed the above considerations.

    First – 12 schools! Holy lord! I just applied to business school successfully and put in applications to only three schools. I applied to only thee colleges as well. I spent weeks on each application tailoring it to the specific school, learning and then
    articulating exactly what that school had to offer both for my benefit and its. With 12 applications to complete, I would imagine this sort of intimacy is hard to achieve.

    Second – it’s not all about your son (I don’t mean that harshly, just as fact). Asking what is wrong with his resume or pedigree suggests you are not seeing the bigger picture. Your son’s applications must speak to more than his GPA, scores, activities, etc. Otherwise, he is no more than a resume. An application must speak to the intersection of the applicant and the school.

    Lastly, I would just like to register that, in my personal experience, Yale is not some bastion of elitism. The students I met were among the most humble, curious and excited individuals I have had the privilege of knowing. I have encountered far more snobbish individuals outside of Yale. It is very easy when one feels slighted to judge in return, but a true mark of superiority is modesty and understanding.

    • ldffly

      Your last paragraph speaks to my experience exactly. As I look back at my experience in education, the most arrogant people I’ve ever encountered were not at Yale, but those in my high school, both administrators and teachers. By no stretch of the imagination were they accomplished people, yet they never hesitated to run people down.
      It’s too bad this young man was denied admission. However, my advice (which I suspect would be yours) is not to fall to the temptation of snobbery in reverse. Find somewhere to go to school, get a stellar record that first year and then take a run at transferring. That’s not easy either, but it works on occasion.

    • BRUCE LEE

      yes. no admit to class.

      i was class of 1990 and sat through interview for application to admisssion office.

      Yes. admtted to class.

      No. Not admitted to class.

      Waitlist. wait for opening.

      YES. NO. WAIT FOR OPENING.

      The idea of teaching one class to 50 students is just Dinosour.

      UDACITY, professor at stanford university has idea that teaching to a class of 50 is obslete.

      HARVARD/MIT wants to educate ONE BILLION STUDENTS. ONE BILLIONS STUDENTS..

      bill gates/warren buffett giving pledge. Give All away for free free free before we go to cemetary.

      No professor can teach from cemetary.

      • yalengineer

        You realize that MIT doesn’t actually believe this. MIT gives out their courses for free because they understand that students pay to attend MIT not for the courses but for the community.

  • HH

    Let’s take it to the
    dark side of discrimination, i.e. discrimination against certain religion or
    ethnic background. Is Yale equal opportunity institution?

  • BRUCE LEE

    I was Yale class of 1990. I sat through classes in physics, chemistry history philosophy and got my BA in 1990.

    This idea of having 50-100 people sit one class or one seminar is just ancient, just like dinosour.

    Albert Eisteins’s Theory of Relativity /Quantum Mechanics are subjects which take 10-30 years to study and one still cannot understand quantum mechanics. How many people know “””” quantum mechanics”””

    One course posted online can reach 100-500 Millions people or the total number of people on internet, which will be 7 billion by 2020.

    One course can reach all 7-billion people on earth by 2020. Yale University Anytime/Anywhere for all 7 Billion people.

    Post all courses online. Whole world or 7 billion people can see for Free or Almost Free.

    Bill Gates/Warren Buffett Giving Pledge: professor cannot teach from cemetary. There is No cemetary University for any professor/students…..

    Steve jobs: richest man in cemetary. 1955-2011
    No professor can take Information/knowledge/books to the cemetary.

    Bill Gates/Warren Buffett Giving Plede: no one can take it to the
    cemetary.. No one can teach/lecture/research from cemetary.

    Give it all away before we go the Next life. Millions/billions can
    benefit from one great professor. Yale University Anytime/Anywhere.

  • BRUCE LEE

    Founder of Udacity, ex- professor said around 2020, the world may have 10-20 colleges left.

    HARVARD/MIT aims to educate 1 billion students or 7 billion students when all people on earth have access to internet.

    Bill Gates: college will be obsolete by 2020.

    The idea of teaching one class to 50-100 people is just Dinosour.

    100 Million to 500 Million students one watch one Yale lecture anytime/anwhere.

    I was class of 1990.

    Woke up /took shower/went to lectures on physics/chemsitry. this is so ancient.

    Post one lectures online: world can for free free free.

    Join Harvard/MIT: educate 1 billion or 7 billion by 2020.

    • yalengineer

      Yale joins Coursera instead. Game/Set/Match.

  • Eli Yale

    I would tell alumni that their kids have no chance of getting into Yale; don’t bother applying–your parents had their opportunity. Yale doesn’t need alumni donations; they are using the endowment to search the globe for different, under-privileged kids. The impact this will have on the culture of Yale over the long term may be cause for concern.

    • yalengineer

      As an alum, I will continue to donate because that I think that is a good thing.

  • lucydaisy

    I’m puzzled as to why Yale thinks that they need to dig-up “underrepresented minorities” when there are many, many white people who are better candidates? Why does Yale think it needs to remedy some sort of historical issue?

  • lucydaisy

    This can’t possibly be a real person or position – Amin Abdul-Malik Gonzalez, an associate director of the admissions office and co-director of multicultural recruitment. This came from The Onion, right?