University | 4:06 pm | December 3, 2012 | By Apsara Iyer

Grand Strategy launches simulation website, lives in virtual reality

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Photo by GS.

President Barack Obama’s weekly YouTube addresses are so 2011. There’s a new administration on campus: Yale’s “Studies in Grand Strategy” class.

Students and administrators in the course recently launched a simulation website that provides a press room, gallery and vision for the administration composed of “Grand Strategy” course members, who simulate members of the presidential cabinet and staff. Tantum Collins ’13 plays the fictional president, complete with his vice president Drew Macklis ’13, chief of staff Meredith Potter ’13 and others — the list goes on.

Eager to keep up to date on the latest declaration of President Collins’ administration?

Scroll through the press briefings to read a White House Statement on “Operations in the Strait of Hormuz” or the “Department of Energy.” Interested in the various positions of the class members? Find out who’s deputy chief of staff, or ambassador to the United Nations, or special advisor to the Middle East on the site’s “Administration” page.

And if the fictional press releases don’t convince you, the articles also feature pictures of the “president” and his cabinet signing off on acts. To make things even more authentic, the site even features a parallel to Obama’s “birther” controversy, with Collins releasing a copy of his birth certificate.

With its muted blue background, dark navy banner and illustration of the White House, the site is practically a new, improved version of the true White House page. (Fingers crossed the similarity doesn’t cause any unnecessary confusion.)

But, alas, the realism dims slightly with the latest announcement of passing the “Dernbach-Zhang Ensuring Solvency Act,” which swiftly averts the fiscal cliff through cooperative, bipartisan efforts. Perhaps President Barack Obama should check out this site, as it seems a group of Yale seniors have found the solution to the nation’s most pressing economic issue.

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