August 10th, 2012 | University

Time, CNN suspend Zakaria ’86 for plagiarism

Yale Trustee Fareed Zakaria ’86 was suspended by Time Magazine and CNN today after plagiarizing parts of his Aug. 20 Time column on gun control.

Zakaria, editor-at-large of Time Magazine and host of CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS, admitted in a statement that portions of the column closely resemble paragraphs in an April New Yorker article by Jill Lepore GRD ’95, according to the Atlantic Wire. In a short statement to the News, University President Richard Levin said that he is “in the process of convening a meeting of the Yale Corporation Committee on Trusteeship to discuss the process for reviewing this matter, which we take very seriously.”

A statement from a Time spokeswoman to the Atlantic Wire said Zakaria’s actions “violate our own standards for our columnists” and announced that his column would be suspended for a month, “pending further review.” CNN, which published a shorter blog post by Zakaria also containing sections similar to Lepore’s article, said his show has been suspended while the issue is “under review.”

“It is a serious lapse and one that is entirely my fault. I apologize unreservedly to [Lepore], to my editors at Time, and to my readers,” said Zakaria, who was named a successor trustee of the Yale Corporation in 2006.

The similiarities between Zakaria’s column and Lepore’s article were first reported by the conservative website NewsBusters.

Below are the paragraphs in question from Zakaria’s column and from the New Yorker:

From Zakaria’s column in Time’s Aug. 20 issue:

  • Adam Winkler, a professor of constitutional law at UCLA, documents the actual history in Gunfight: The Battle over the Right to Bear Arms in America. Guns were regulated in the U.S. from the earliest years of the Republic. Laws that banned the carrying of concealed weapons were passed in Kentucky and Louisiana in 1813. Other states soon followed: Indiana in 1820, Tennessee and Virginia in 1838, Alabama in 1839 and Ohio in 1859. Similar laws were passed in Texas, Florida and Oklahoma. As the governor of Texas (Texas!) explained in 1893, the “mission of the concealed deadly weapon is murder. To check it is the duty of every self-respecting, law-abiding man.”

From Lepore’s article in the New Yorker’s April 23 issue:

  • As Adam Winkler, a constitutional-law scholar at U.C.L.A., demonstrates in a remarkably nuanced new book, “Gunfight: The Battle Over the Right to Bear Arms in America,” firearms have been regulated in the United States from the start. Laws banning the carrying of concealed weapons were passed in Kentucky and Louisiana in 1813, and other states soon followed: Indiana (1820), Tennessee and Virginia (1838), Alabama (1839), and Ohio (1859). Similar laws were passed in Texas, Florida, and Oklahoma. As the governor of Texas explained in 1893, the “mission of the concealed deadly weapon is murder. To check it is the duty of every self-respecting, law-abiding man.”