University | 1:50 am | December 5, 2011 | By Gavan Gideon and Tapley Stephenson

Levin among top 10 highest paid university presidents

University President Richard Levin is among the top 10 highest paid university presidents.
University President Richard Levin is among the top 10 highest paid university presidents. Photo by YDN.

University President Richard Levin was the highest paid president in the Ivy League in 2009-’10, according to the most recent data in the Chronicle of Higher Education.

Levin’s total compensation was $1,627,649, a 6.4 percent raise from the previous year, the report stated. The Yale Corporation’s Compensation Committee determines Levin’s salary by considering factors such as Yale’s progress during Levin’s tenure, his unusual longevity as president and his role as a national figure, Yale spokesman Tom Conroy told the News. Levin is the longest serving president in the Ivy League, having arrived at Yale in 1993.

Out of 519 presidents surveyed by the Chronicle, Levin came in ninth in overall compensation and third in base salary, with $1,042,049.

Conroy said the Committee and the Corporation consider how Levin’s compensation compares with other presidents at universities “of comparable complexity and quality” with certain characteristics such as intensive research and a medical school.

But Levin was not the highest paid University official in in 2009-’10 — that honor goes to Chief Investment Officer David Swenson, who earned $3,875,940 for his work, according to the University’s 2010 Internal Revenue Service Form 990.

Constantine Papadakis of Drexel University was the highest-paid university president, though the bulk of his $4,912,127 in earnings came from life insurance when he died in April 2009. Lee Bollinger of Columbia came in second in the Ivy League and twelfth on the list, raking in $1,527,217.

The report showed that Yale also placed 9th in average professor compensation, with an average compensation of $211,300.

Comments
  • claypoint2

    Well, Rick Levin deserves it. During his tenure, he has prepared – and, in some ways, transformed – Yale for the 21st century. The university that I remember (back in the ’80s) had an ailing physical plant and wasn’t particularly engaged in global/international conversations. What a transformation. Yale is not only looking aesthetically beautiful these days, but its physical plant has been structurally strengthened and significantly expanded. Through multiple programs and partnerships in a variety of fields, Yale and its influence have now expanded well beyond our borders. Levin and his team also led a wildly successful capital campaign in the midst of a deep recession. As a proud alum who is very protective of Yale, I think that he deserves every penny he gets!

    • nelle0905

      The workers who have gotten minimal (2%) increases over the last few years might feel a bit differently…

  • Inigo_Montoya

    He has also taken necessary steps to improve Yale’s teaching and research in the sciences, engineering, and mathematics. I don’t always agree with Levin, but I think that he’s been a very good University President.

  • Yokel

    Is this some sort of cheering section? Maybe he should run for mayor also…lol.

  • LouieLouie

    I’ve been a part of Yale for 10 years and a resident of the New Haven area for more than 30 and I’ve seen a dramatic change in the city of New Haven since Levin has been President. He helped establish the Office of New Haven and State Affairs and the increased involvement with the community has strengthened the city and has revitalized many areas that were in decline. The involvement with the city schools, the New Haven Promise program, the HomeBuyers benefit for staff and many other outreach initiatives have really transformed the city. In the late 70s and 80s, New Haven was not the vibrant, cultural place it is today and I think alot of that is due to President Levin using all Yale’s resources; money as well as talented students to help out the surrounding community.

  • GeoJoe

    > Constantine Papadakis of Drexel University was the highest-paid university president, though the bulk of his $4,912,127 in earnings came from life insurance when he died in April 2009.

    That’s awkward.

  • joey00
  • nelle0905

    Yes, Yale has grown and improved over the time Rick Levin has been there. However, hundreds of people were affected by mandatory layoffs and wage decreases at Yale during the 2010 fiscal year (including myself), and he got a 6.4% raise. A truly great leader would have taken the hit as well — and now we’re being told that we’re going to have to cut back again for the next fiscal year. C’mon, Rick — step up to the plate…

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