November 7th, 2011 | City

Final push in power restoration

The storm set new records with over 20 inches of snowfall in the northeastern part of Connecticut. The original record for October was 9.5 inches, recorded in Norfolk, Conn. in 1987.
The storm set new records with over 20 inches of snowfall in the northeastern part of Connecticut. The original record for October was 9.5 inches, recorded in Norfolk, Conn. in 1987. Photo by Sharon Yin.

For me, the extent of the impact of the late October snowstorm was a bruise on my hip after wiping out on the ice. But some unlucky Connecticut residents outside New Haven are still without power, thanks to Connecticut Light & Power.

CL&P promised to restore power to 99 percent of its customers on Sunday, but 51,000 customers still are out of electricity. Fortunately by Monday morning, 97 percent of customers had their power back.

Thousands of CL&P workers worked all weekend to try to restore power in towns throughout the state, including Farmington, Salisbury, Washington and Roxbury. Gov. Dannel Malloy even dispatched 60 state Department of Transportation crews and 496 members of the Connecticut National Guard around the state in an attempt to expedite the power restoration process, the Courant reported. Malloy didn’t mince words in regards to CL&P’s inability to effectively restore power to over 800,000 customers who lost power after last weekend’s snowstorm. He called the utilities company’s inability to communicated “astounding.”

As legislators fight in Hartford, customers statewide are still in the cold. In Bloomfield, some residents will likely have to go another few nights. As of Sunday afternoon, only a mere 44 percent of CL&P customers had their power back. Bloomfield’s council members are so upset that they plan to pursue a lawsuit against CL&P. Malloy, for his part, plans to launch a review of the company’s response to the storm. In the meantime, Malloy encourages all Connecticut citizens to make preparations based on worst case scenarios — that is, when a power company fails to restore power despite its promises — and not simply based on what is expected to happen.

And with winter actually coming up, let’s hope Yale makes special note of Malloy’s recommendation — but if not, maybe then at least we’ll get a snow day. For those with family across the state still in the dark, check here to see when they might get their power back.