Uncategorized | 3:28 am | April 25, 2011 | By Yale Daily News

Cross Campus: 4.25.11

Medieval times. Ezra Stiles College held its annual Medieval Night on Saturday, featuring ye olde foods such as capon, also known as castrated rooster. As part of the festivities, members of the college raided Silliman’s dining hall, grabbing everything from napkin dispensers to fruits and cereals.

Foiled! Davenporter Daniel Zelaya ’13 caught Piersonites in the act of trying to steal Davenport’s dining hall gnome at 3 a.m. Saturday. According to an email from Davenporter Nathaniel Zelinsky ’13 (signed by the Davenport Department of Gnomeland Security) Zelaya, “along with a team of crack gnome commandos,” stopped the Piersonites.

Teaching the world to sing. Yale posted a promotional video for May’s Yale Day of Service to its YouTube channel Wednesday. The video, directed by Austin Kase ’11, features students singing “I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing (In Perfect Harmony).”

In other Yale YouTube news, Wyclef Jean of the Fugees appeared in a YouTube video on Friday to promote a new film by the Yale International Relations Association. The documentary is about political rebuilding after the Haitian earthquake, features Jean, and will be shown in William L. Harkness Hall this Friday.

The Professors of Bluegrass, the band of Yale professors featuring Provost Peter Salovey and Davenport College Dean Craig Harwood, performed in the Davenport common room Saturday afternoon. Harwood’s son, Asher, also joined in, wielding his own guitar.

Sillibunny. At 5:30 a.m. Sunday, the “Sillibunny” emailed a poem to Sillimanders explaining the presence of a “surprise” (read: plastic Easter eggs) in the courtyard. Much to students’ chagrin, however, squirrels got to the treats before students could.

THIS DAY IN YALE HISTORY

1937 University Librarian Andrew Keogh announces that George Watson Cole, an “outstanding librarian and bibliographer from Pasadena, California,” gave over 2,000 volumes to Sterling Memorial Library in what will be known as the George Watson Cole Bibliographical Collection.

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