Uncategorized | 10:00 am | April 22, 2011 | By Caroline Tan

What’s up at the Ivies: provosts, happiness and Pulitzer Prizes edition

This is a regular feature that takes a look at what’s going on at other schools in the Ivy League.

Harvard University

Harvard University recently announced that Alan M. Garber, a Stanford professor of medicine and economics, will replace Steven E. Hyman as University Provost. A summa cum laude graduate who studied economics at the College, Garber also received his Ph.D. in economics from Harvard and served on a Harvard Medical School and Harvard Dental School visiting committee.

Princeton University

Princeton lecturer in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese Languages and Cultures Antonio Calvo died last week in New York City. Calvo had served as director of the department’s Spanish language program and the Princeton in Spain program, as well as an academic advisor for the University’s Butler College. Zach Goldman, a Princeton in Spain attendee, told The Daily Princetonian that “Antonio was the single best professor I’ve ever had.”

Columbia University

Columbia University professors and alums celebrated Monday at the 95th annual Pulitzer Prize ceremony held at Columbia’s School of Journalism. Columbia Professor Eric Foner won the history prize for his book “The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery,” while professor Siddhartha Mukherjee won the general nonfiction prize for “The Emperor of All Maladies: A biography of Cancer” and Columbia alum Zhou Long received the music composition award for his opera “Madame White Snake.”

Dartmouth College

Following the recent death of Yale University’s Michele Dufault ’11, Dartmouth’s Thayer School of Engineering machine shop announced it would re-examine its own safety policies to prevent future harm to students. These changes include increasing the number of teaching assistants present during evening hours and requiring all students – even bald ones – to wear hats.

University of Pennsylvania

Penn alum Lawrence Schoenberg, who received his bachelor’s degree from the College in 1953 and an MBA from Wharton in 1957, recently donated 280 medieval and renaissance manuscripts worth $20 million to the rare books collection of Penn’s Van Pelt Library. Most of Schoenberg’s manuscripts focus on science, technology and medicine.

Brown University

According to a poll conducted last month by the Brown Daily Herald, 72 percent of Brown students are “very happy” with their college experience, while 24 percent said they were “somewhat happy” and the remaining 4 percent were “very unhappy,” “somewhat unhappy” or “neither happy nor unhappy.” With Emma Watson taking a break from Brown, we wonder how many of those students will stay “very happy.”

Cornell University

As a result of new measures taken by the Cornell Concert Commission, significantly fewer students were hospitalized during Cornell’s Lupe Fiasco concert last Sunday than at the University’s Kid Cudi concert on Nov. 6. Some of these changes included basing Cornell University Emergency Medical Service workers by the weight room in Barton Hall, where the concert was held, as well as selling concessions to concert attendees to decrease intoxication. We wonder how Yalies will respond to Lupe when he performs at Spring Fling next Tuesday.

Comments