April 4th, 2011 | Uncategorized

Media descends on campus to report Title IX story

In the wake of the Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights investigation into claims of a “hostile sexual environment” at Yale, a flurry of media coverage has descended onto campus.

Segments that included interviews with Hannah Zeavin ’12 and Alexandra Brodsky ’12, two of the 16 cosignatories behind the complaint that provoked this investigation, were respectively aired by Good Morning America and the Today Show Monday morning, in which they both brought their claims of the University’s inadequate response to sexual misconduct to the national forum.

Moreover, midway through a GMA package a male student off-camera shouted a loud unintelligible comment while the reporter interviewed a female student on Old Campus. Although it was difficult to decipher what the man said, the voice-over explained that the comment was sexually explicit remark.

Later this morning, Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced a set of guidelines for how universities should respond to allegations of sexual harassment. In an interview with the Chronicle of Higher Education, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights Russlyn Ali said that the timing of the Yale investigation and the Department of Education’s letter was purely coincidental. Watch the clip below:

[via Jezebel]

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  • jnewsham

    “Moreover, midway through a GMA package a male student off-camera shouted a loud unintelligible comment while the reporter interviewed a female student on Old Campus. Although it was difficult to decipher what the man said, the voice-over explained that the comment was sexually explicit remark.”

    Stay classy, guys! That’ll prove them wrong.

  • penny_lane

    While I agree with her statement fully, if Ms. Zeavin wants the general public to take her seriously, she needs to use real language that they can relate to, not jargon like “bodily agency.”

  • mrmike527

    “If everywhere you turn, there is someone who has violated another person’s bodily agency, and they’re near you, how are you supposed to go about having those bright college years?”

    Wait, what? Why are these kids acting like every man on campus is guilty of sexual assault? I realize it would be intimidating to go to class with a kid who raped a friend. But since when is there someone who has sexually assaulted others “everywhere you turn?”

  • iamanalum

    By saying “everywhere you turn there is someone who has violated another person’s bodily agency,” Ms. Zeavin seems to be coming close, if not saying outright, that most if not all men at Yale are rapists. Not only is this far from the truth, it is just as damaging to the psyches and outlook of these men as the yells of the fraternity men were to the women. If young men mature in an environment where women constantly assert that any overture is rape, that all men are rapists lying in wait – as was a pervasive ethos during my time at Yale – it can cripple their ability to develop mature, healthy adult relationships with women, and convince them that women are enemies who seek to unjustly frame them for crimes and ruin their futures.

    Ms. Zeavin: Most Yale men are not rapists. Most men are not rapists. Men have mothers, they often have sisters, and most men – in particular most intelligent men – view violence and threats of violence toward women as abhorrent. They are not your enemies. Don’t make them your enemies by painting innocent humans are perpetrators of sexual crimes. For in doing so, you are no better than the men shouting offensive and threatening slogans at women.

  • pickle

    No one has to be a rapist to promote violence against women. You simply have to do nothing.

  • Leo

    A good way to combat violence against women is with the strict enforcement of laws against rape. A bad way is with the strict enforcement of laws mandating “gender equality.” If only the leftist busybodies at Yale would “do nothing.” Instead, they are enlisting the coercive power of the federal government in the quest for elusive “social justice.”