Sports | 1:57 pm | March 30, 2011 | By Max de la Bruyere

BOOLA BOOLA | Anderson ’11 trades skates for suit

Men’s hockey forward Jeff Anderson ’11 is going pro, but not quite the kind of pro that youth hockey players dream of.

Anderson, who missed the second half of the Elis’ season after a December leg injury, will take his talents to J.P. Morgan next year, and pass up opportunities to play professional hockey to do so, Bloomberg.com reported.

The winger, a Canadian from Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, called the decision to hang up his skates and go to Wall Street the hardest he has ever made.

“An opportunity with JPMorgan does not come along every day, and if I pursued hockey, I don’t know if it would be around in the future,” Anderson told Bloomberg.

Anderson’s decision is not unprecedented, nor is it unique on his team. His linemate Charles Brockett ’12 will intern at Goldman Sachs this summer.

Jack Morrison ’67, who finished his college career as Yale’s all-time scoring leader and played for the American hockey team at the 1968 Olympics, chose to attend Harvard Business School instead of playing professional hockey.

“Do I ever regret it? Yes, I do,” Morrison told Bloomberg. “You always wonder whether you could have made it professionally.”

Comments
  • 201Y1

    This is sad. Grow a pair, man. Do what you love.

  • snarayan

    Congratulations, John. Clearly, you have understood the meaning of the concept “expected future value” which so many eager young hockey enthusiasts are blissfully unaware of. You will probably make between 30-50 million dollars over your career at JPM and its clones with the US tax payer taking on all career risks. Compare this to grinding your way up thru the AHL at 67,000 dollars per year until, hopefully, you play more than 16 games a season in a NHL team. Where, if you survive injuries,concussions, fights you will probably last about 3-4 years making about between 1-2 million dollars. At the end of which you will, if healthy be back grinding away in the minors or in the Quebec semi-pro league scrounging for pennies in dimly-lit rinks. You will never regret this. Chasing rainbows should never be a career.

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