Tag Archive: Law

  1. Ricci decision to come out Monday

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    Six years after they took a promotional test, New Haven firefighter Frank Ricci and 19 of his peers are about to get more clarity on whether the test’s results will count.

    U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts said Thursday that the Court will hand down rulings on all three remaining pending cases — including the highly anticipated Ricci v. DeStefano case — on Monday morning. It is possible that even after the Court rules that the test’s fate will still be unclear; many observers think the Court will remand the case back to the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court.

  2. Koh: ‘I feel like I am setting sail on a thrilling new adventure’

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    At long last, former Yale Law School Dean Harold Hongju Koh was confirmed this afternoon for the position of legal adviser to the Department of State. Immediately following the vote, Koh sent a message to the Law School community thanking students, faculty members and staff for their support during the confirmation process.

    “My job may be changing, but our friendships are enduring,” he wrote. “I feel like I am setting sail on a thrilling new adventure. One former Legal Adviser once described his job as ‘speaking law to power.’ I pledge to you to do my very best to bring the enduring values of our Law School to serve our country in facing its global challenges.”

    Koh also praised Acting Dean Kate Stith, whose service he called “heroic,” and his successor, Robert Post LAW ’77, whom Koh said “brings extraordinary personal and scholarly gifts to the position.”

    Read his full message after the jump.

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  3. Harold Hongju Koh’s day of reckoning is here

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    Update: The vote has been moved up to 4:10 p.m., according to Reid’s office.

    The long-awaited confirmation vote on Harold Hongju Koh’s nomination to be legal adviser to the Department of State should take place around 5:30 p.m. today, according to a spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid.

  4. Democrats successfully force vote on Koh

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    Updated 10:45 p.m. A vote on Harold Hongju Koh’s nomination to be legal adviser to the Department of State is finally in sight.

    Senate Democrats successfully ended debate on Koh’s nomination this morning, as their cloture motion passed 65 to 31, split mostly along party lines. The cloture motion limits further consideration of Koh’s nomination to no more than 30 hours, meaning the former Yale Law School dean’s confirmation saga should finally come to an end this week.

    The vote came after several Democratic senators spoke out in Koh’s defense. Sen. Joseph Lieberman ’64 LAW ’67 of Connecticut called him “profoundly qualified,” and Sen. John Kerry ’66 of Massachusetts described him as “one of the foremost legal scholars in this country, a man of the highest intellect, integrity and character.”

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  5. Levin: ‘We all believe Dean Koh will be confirmed’

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    Now that his successor has been named, what happens if Harold Hongju Koh fails to win confirmation as legal adviser to the Department of State?

    Put it this way: Yale officials really, really don’t think that’s going to happen.  It better not, at least, or Koh may come back to find himself working in a much smaller office in the Sterling Law Building.

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  6. Reid to force vote on Koh confirmation

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    Updated 7:03 p.m. Harold Hongju Koh’s future should get a lot clearer in about 36 hours.

    Senate Democrats said this evening that they would give Republicans that much time to come to an agreement to consider Koh’s nomination for the position of legal adviser to the Department of State. If no agreement is reached, a cloture vote will be held Wednesday morning, Sen. Jeff Merkley, Democrat of Oregon, said on the Senate floor at 7 p.m. this evening.

    An hour earlier, a spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, Regan Lachapelle, said in an e-mail message to the News that the Nevada senator was filing cloture “right now.” A cloture vote, which requires 60 votes to pass, would end debate on Koh’s nomination and force a vote on it.

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  7. Senate approves Koh. No, not that one.

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    One of the above Kohs has been confirmed by the Senate. Guess which one! (Hint: The less controversial one.)

    The Senate voted Friday to approve the nomination of Howard Koh ’73 MED ’77 — pictured at right — for the position of assistant secretary for health in the Department of Health and Human Services, said Regan Lachapelle, a spokesman for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. Koh will be the primary adviser to Secretary of Health and Human Services Kathleen Sebelius on matters relating to public health.

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  8. Miller: Sotomayor ‘a dedicated and serious young woman’

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    Before Sonia Sotomayor LAW ’79 was nominated to the Supreme Court, she was a student at Princeton — and a classmate of Yale College Dean Mary Miller.

    Along with four other students, Sotomayor and Miller served on a student search committee for a new assistant dean of student affairs. Frustrated with the process, the group wrote a letter to the editor in the September 12, 1974, issue of The Daily Princetonian.

    In the letter, which can be read in full here, the students criticized the search’s focus on selecting a minority candidate and the vague role of the student committee. While Miller is white and Sotomayor is Latina, both were chosen because they are women, at a time when Princeton was largely male.

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  9. Still no ruling in Ricci case

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    The United States Supreme Court issued two opinions today, but neither was about the much-discussed Ricci v. DeStefano case. The Court has been widely expected to release its ruling on that case sometime this month, but there is now speculation that it may wait until after the confirmation hearings for Sonia Sotomayor LAW ’79, which are scheduled for mid-July.

    As Legal Times points out, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said on Friday at the annual conference of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 2nd Circuit that “one can safely predict [Ricci] will be among the last to come out before the term ends.” The Supreme Court’s term technically does not end until September, though all decisions were expected to be released before the justices leave for summer recess.

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  10. Koh’s confirmation vote is held up in Senate

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    A vote on Yale Law School Dean Harold Hongju Koh’s nomination to the post of legal adviser to the Department of State has been delayed indefinitely in the Senate, sources familiar with the situation told the News this week.

    Two Senate aides, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of the delicate nature of confirmation votes, said that at least one senator had placed a “hold” on Koh’s vote. A hold is an informal practice in which senators express to the leadership that they may filibuster a bill, usually preventing it from coming to the floor until certain concessions are made.

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  11. Finish his law degree? No, Brian Deese has G.M. to dismantle.

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    A few years ago, Brian Deese put his studies at Yale Law School on hold to volunteer for the presidential campaigns of Sen. Hillary Clinton LAW ’73 and, after she dropped out of the race, then-Sen. Barack Obama. After the election, it might have seemed likely that Deese would return to the Law School, where he was once a member of the class of 2008, to receive his degree.

    But it turned out President Obama had another assignment in store for Deese: He would be made responsible for the fate of the U.S. auto industry.

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  12. Recording hints at Sotomayor’s take on Ricci v. DeStefano

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    The Wall Street Journal has posted a recording of the controversial Ricci v. Destefano case being argued in front of the three-judge panel of the Second Circuit Court of Appeals — a panel that included President Barack Obama’s nominee to the U.S. Supreme Court, Sonia Sotomayor LAW ’79.

    “We’re not suggesting that unqualified people be hired, the city’s not suggesting that,” Sotomayor told the firefighters’ attorney, Karen Torre, at one point in the hearing. “[But] if your test is going to always put a certain group at the bottom of the pass rate so they’re never, ever going to be promoted, and there is a fair test that could be devised that measures knowledge in a more substantive way, then why shouldn’t the city have an opportunity to try to look and see if it can develop that?”

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