Opinion

MEDANSKY: The Ball in Salovey’s court

October 11, 2013 • 0
I hesitate to call this weekend’s inauguration a paradigm for inclusivity. Instead, the administration has spun its imperfect, yet benign ceremony into a shaky symbol for a democratic Yale.

MEDANSKY: The neutral Internet

September 25, 2012 • 1
The Internet surprises me every day, and this time, Facebook’s the culprit. When she used Facebook to invite friends to her 16th birthday party, Dutch teenager Merthe Weusthuis opened a Pandora’s box of virtual catastrophes. Weusthuis forgot to mark her party — a small affair at her home in Haren, Groningen — as private. Her »
Opinion

MEDANSKY: Broadening the liberal arts

September 18, 2012 • 2
The students of the journalism program, however, recieved a slightly different explanation. In a letter to the students, the program’s director, Hank Klibanoff, recounted his experiences at a recent meeting where Foreman alerted him of the program’s fate. Journalism is “viewed by many at Emory as a ‘pre-professional program’ and therefore as ‘not an easy »

MEDANSKY: Don’t begrudge happiness

September 11, 2012 • 5
Back in 1960, the famed Objectivist author Ayn Rand came to New Haven to deliver a lecture at Yale. Ever the harbinger of controversy and debate — are you listening, Rick Santorum? — our dear Alisa Rosenbaum drew quite the crowd, with students from both Yale College and the professional schools packing the auditorium of »
Opinion

MEDANSKY: Honor without a code

September 4, 2012 • 4
There’s a problem with cheating in the Ivy League, and Dartmouth students want to fix it. They’ve proposed an honor code that will obligate students not only to confess to their own academic transgressions but to reveal the dishonestly of others, too. Their proposal has created a wave of discussion. Princeton students want to implement »
Opinion

MEDANSKY: Yale is for everyone

August 24, 2012 • 1
Contrary to popular belief, Al Gore did not invent the Internet. The history of the Internet, in fact, is devoid of future vice presidents, barred from the kind of “Social Network”-style mythology that would otherwise separate truth from myth. I know little about the history of the Internet; freshman year at Yale, it seems, can’t »
Opinion

MEDANSKY: Sticking in time

April 12, 2012 • 0
Exactly five years and one day ago, Kurt Vonnegut — the great author, humanist and, yes, Midwesterner — passed away, and, somehow, someone or something unstuck my eighth-grade heart. I knew Kurt Vonnegut well — in my bookshelf and in my backpack, after dinner and between classes. I knew Kilgore Trout, Dwayne Hoover and Harrison »
Opinion

MEDANSKY: Presidents and precedents

March 29, 2012 • 3
“The History of our Revolution,” wrote John Adams in 1790, “will be one continued lye from one end to the other. The essence of the whole will be that Dr. Franklin’s electric rod smote the earth and out sprang General Washington. Then Franklin electrified him, and thence forward those two conducted all the Policy, Negotiations, »
Opinion

MEDANSKY: Forgetting birthdays and buying cupcakes

March 1, 2012 • 7
Unlike the 18th birthday — that due moment of pomp and circumstance that triggers the right to vote for office and die for country — the 19th birthday confers no particular responsibility. It passes relatively unnoticed. Consider the ghost of your birthdays past: the cultural milestones of double-digits, the bar or bat mitzvah, the quinceanera, »
Opinion

MEDANSKY: Abraham Lincoln: Hunting for more than vampires

February 16, 2012 • 2
The great Illinois poet Carl Sandburg — the scribe of his big-shouldered city — published “Chicago Poems” in 1916. A prolific non-fiction author and poet, Sandburg wrote volumes upon volumes chronicling the childhood and the presidency of Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln — a fellow man of the Midwest—fascinated him, and Sandburg’s fascination spawned one of his »
Opinion

MEDANSKY: Limited autism discourse

February 2, 2012 • 674
“Touch,” a new television series premiering this week on Fox, centers on the experiences of Jake, an enigmatic 11-year-old boy endowed with dazzling mathematical abilities and a profound sense of isolation. He doesn’t talk, either; Jake’s father must navigate his son’s world in silence. Previous descriptions of the show explicitly described Jake as autistic, but »
Opinion

MEDANSKY: Running away from the glass ceiling

January 19, 2012 • 5
In 1872, Victoria Woodhull ran for president of the United States. At least, she tried to run. A newspaper-publishing, stock-exchanging and pot-stirring advocate for sexual liberty and women’s suffrage, Woodhull nabbed the nomination of the historically dubious Equal Rights Party. Her bid was questionable, and, ever the rabble-rouser, Woodhull spent Election Day behind bars. Alas, »