BROWN: A parade of racism

When I first came to Yale, I was disturbed by three things. First, practically all the dining hall workers were African-American. Second, no one else seemed to have a problem with this. And third, I quickly grew accustomed to this, no longer squirming every single time I went into the dining hall. But then, in December of my freshman year, came an event where I could overlook it no longer: the Parade of Comestibles.

Very soon, another freshman class will head to Commons to witness table after table of desserts decorated in a manner that is perhaps the closest Yale’s kitchens will ever get to the confectionary brilliance of the sugar castles of Versailles. There are meats, specialty drinks, platters upon platters of food and even a parade down the center aisle of Commons in which the dining hall staff roll out all the foods they’ve spent hours perfecting. Smiles, cheering and camera flashing abound.

And then, finally, there is a mad rush to one side of Commons, where hundreds of students descend upon the servers, grabbing what they can. I have a particularly vivid memory of a wooden fishing crate, complete with netting, shells and red cooked lobsters — and then of the servers removing the lobsters and throwing them, antennas and all, into the crowd.

It’s the kind of decadence that makes you think, this is Yale — and yet I cannot help but wish that Yale, at least in this respect, were very, very different. After all, the event is reminiscent of a history of African-American subservience that, each Christmas, turned to joyful festivity.

Critics of my cynicism will cry foul, saying that the Parade of Comestibles is a beautiful Yale tradition — but, God, how I hate that word tradition and how it can excuse such a multitude of sins.

About half the people I’ve spoken to were completely oblivious of the racial undertones of the parade and had had a wonderful time; the other half were, like me, deeply disconcerted.

Yet when I complained about this event in the Yale Herald, I was told to chill out: the employees are grateful for their jobs, New Haven is mostly black anyway and the workers don’t consider their lives to be some sort of Greek tragedy.

But the thing is, New Haven isn’t mostly black at all; in fact, according to the U.S. census, in 2010, New Haven was 42.6 percent Caucasian and 35.4 percent African-American. So even if one generously assumed that New Haven had equivalent numbers of each racial group, then why — as practically every Yale student can attest — does nearly every single dining hall worker seem to be black? After all, it’s not that New Haven is mostly black; it’s just that it seems mostly black given the proximity of campus to largely African-American communities and the overwhelming numbers of service staff who are black.

Then, some will ask, well, who do you want washing the dirty dishes of society? Someone’s got to do it. True enough — and I hardly think that, in this economy, anyone can be ungrateful for full-time employment. Furthermore, I cannot imagine Yale ever becoming one of those co-op schools where students all pitch in to cook and clean for each other. So it is true that I have no short-term solution to this problem.

However, the current state of affairs absolutely requires a long-term solution. The fact that dining hall positions are filled primarily by African-Americans indicates that public education has failed to prepare them for other kinds of vocations — a failure which has disproportionally affected them in relation to other populations in New Haven. There is nothing wrong in choosing a manual job of one’s own volition, but it is terrible that an entire community has been consigned to such labor because it has never been given the opportunity to do otherwise.

This must change, not only for the sake of the dining hall workers, but for the sake of Yale students. Because here’s the scary thing: when you get used to being served by people of a certain race, you start to conflate their profession with their identity. You grow complacent, and you accept the status quo because, after all, as you reason to yourself in a voice down in the pit of your stomach that will never reach the light of day, that’s what they do. That’s who they are. And that is wrong.

The Parade of Comestibles highlights the truly glaring social problems at work in the New Haven community. And no, it may not be a Greek tragedy — but it is an American one.

Kathryn A. Brown is a senior in Calhoun College. Contact her at kathryn.brown@yale.edu.

Comments

  • The Anti-Yale

    Is the Versailles-atmosphere of Yale banqueting any more wasteful or gluttonous than the raging herds worldwide at McDonalds counters every day?

    As to racial inequity. I was brought up in the pre-school-bus days in a white suburb of New Haven.

    Brown v. Board of Education is only 58 years old. You don’t change 200 years of inequity in educational opportunities in just half a century—even with school busing.

    Add to the mix the distractions and diversions of instant celebrity on sports fields and pop-music stages, glorified by television, and YouTube, (as opposed to the drudgery of incremental achievement offered by eduactional treadmills) and you’ve got an uphill battle.

    Bill Cosby actually is on to something with his efforts to promote education as a noble goal in his community.

  • redman

    Kathryn, please visit some of New Haven’s schools and observe what is happening, then you will be able to understand.

  • dm

    This is such a thoughtless piece by someone who obviously does not understand New Haven or the labor situation at Yale. I agree it is problematic that there are too many African-Americans in this city who feel limited in their options. But, you should not necessarily turn dining hall workers into victims. Because of years of union bargaining, these jobs have good levels of benefits given that they are manual, service-sector jobs. Additional Yale programs, like the Homebuyer Program and New Haven Promise, have played (or will play) big roles in helping people who work at this university and their families move up. You may say that I am writing a puff piece for the university, but I have actual been out on streets across this town on behalf of Promise and other initiatives. And when I visit houses, the nicest ones in some of the most dangerous neighborhoods tend to be those who work at Yale. I had a twenty minute conversation about college on Dewitt Street in the Hill with a construction worker whose wife works in the Calhoun dining hall. The point he emphasized to me: He was sending his kids to Amistad so that they would go to college because you need to go to college now to be successful.

    Just because someone works a tough, manual job does not mean that they are a victim. Many are leaders in their community–Frank Douglass comes to mind–and many more are striving for better lives for their children.

  • The Anti-Yale

    “This is such a thoughtless piece by someone who obviously does not understand . . .”

    I don’t think it is thoughtless at all. I was struck by the honesty of Ms. Brown’s unhappy reaction to the fact that the dining hall staff seem to be entirely African American.

    It is as if one were in a 1920′s movie and all the train conductors and kitchen help were black,

    How is it may I ask that there are no poor white people in New Haven? And if there are poor white people, why aren’t they represented in census of Yale Dining Hall staff?

    Is it the case that white people have higher incomes and therefore don’t need to work as dining hall help?

    Isn’t that de facto institutional racism? The institutions which call for professional credentials and which pay well for those credentials fill themselves with white help and the institutions which do NOT call for professional credentials and do NOT pay well fill themselves with African American help.

    PK

    • River_Tam

      > Isn’t that de facto institutional racism?

      No. That would be like saying that the NFL constitutes “de facto institutional sexism” because women can’t play as well as men (sorry, we don’t have the testosterone). Just as physical strength is required for professional football, so to are professional credentials required for many jobs.

      In fact, the wage gap between blacks and whites and men and women disappear when you take into account a litany of factors including education level, continuous employment, and job experience.

      • lakia

        River makes an excellent point. Perhaps Ms. Brown might consider writing an article on why so many professional athletes are black, drawing obscene salaries, and doing little to educate the black community with their windfall. Or do we only put poor black and wealthy white people under a microscope?

        • River_Tam

          Sorry, disagree. It’s obvious why so many professional athletes are black. Professional athletes in general come from disproportionately poor backgrounds because poor youth are drawn to “Make or Break” professions as a way to escape poverty. If you can’t read by the time you’re in fifth grade but you are the tallest guy in your class, becoming a professional basketball player sounds like a pretty good way to escape poverty.

    • ycollege14

      And there are definitely poor white people in New Haven. I’ve worked with many of them.

  • eli1

    Ummmmm this issue really isnt that hard to understand. Most of the dining hall staff is black because 99% of the uneducated population in New Haven looking for low wage manual labor employment is black. Chalk that up to poor education, history, or whatever, but it really shouldn’t surprise you. Look at the low wage workforce in any major city and it is the same way.

  • River_Tam

    > When I first came to Yale, I was disturbed by three things. First, practically all the dining hall workers were African-American. Second, no one else seemed to have a problem with this. And third, I quickly grew accustomed to this, no longer squirming every single time I went into the dining hall.

    Do you propose that next time we are faced with a choice of hiring a black or a white worker, we choose the white one to balance things out?

  • jamesdakrn

    My only reaction to this article: WTF?

  • Tan

    This is the dumbest thing I’ve ever read at Yale. Ever.

  • River_Tam

    Smh. This is, without a doubt, one of the most arrogant, tone-deaf, condescending, racist articles I’ve ever read in the YDN. I’d urge the author take a good look at her own prejudices. She’s the one who, through this Parade of Racism, reveals her own prejudices and puts on hideous display the fact that she can’t see past skin color.

    > There is nothing wrong in choosing a manual job of one’s own volition, but it is terrible that an entire community has been consigned to such labor because it has never been given the opportunity to do otherwise.

    An entire community? Look around, you have black classmates. They aren’t “consigned to such labor” (an unfortunate word choice – consignment refers to property, not autonomous agents). I worked my way through school, and I have a few friends who actually *did* work part time in dining halls to put them through school. Don’t pride yourself on not getting your hands dirty.

    > When I first came to Yale, I was disturbed by three things. First, practically all the dining hall workers were African-American.

    Why is this disturbing? Would you be so disturbed if all the professors at Yale were black? Of course not – implicit in this entire piece is your OWN condescending “pity the manual laborer” attitude. It’s sickening. Also, a lot of those “African-American” workers you’re seeing are actually mixed, which you would know if you bothered to get to know them instead of getting all squirmy at the sight of black people who make less money than your parents do.

    > Second, no one else seemed to have a problem with this.

    There are more than a few other Yalies who share your condescending pity, but they’re too smart to open their mouths and reveal their shallow and sheltered view of the world.

    > And third, I quickly grew accustomed to this, no longer squirming every single time I went into the dining hall.

    Good. Squirming because the people earning an honest wage and making money for their families are all of the same race? Smh.

    > After all, the event is reminiscent of a history of African-American subservience that, each Christmas, turned to joyful festivity.

    I have ancestors who were slaves, both in this country and in others. I got no such impression from watching the spectacle (yes, it is spectacle), and I’d hazard that the dining hall cooks and workers — all of whom seemed to enjoy the evening when I went — do not consider themselves slaves or servants either. Maybe you should watch Roots or read Uncle Tom’s Cabin or do SOMETHING so you know what slavery and servitude actually are.

    (continued in part 2 due to length)

  • River_Tam

    > Yet when I complained about this event in the Yale Herald, I was told to chill out: the employees are grateful for their jobs,

    Grateful? Grateful is not really the right word. I suppose we are all grateful for our jobs, but why should a dining hall worker be more or less grateful for their job than you or I? They’re not charity cases – they’re workers who are earning a decent wage providing a service that I, and thousands of other Yalies, use and appreciate. My dad still earns less money than the average Yale Dining employee, and he’s damn proud of what he does.

    > Furthermore, I cannot imagine Yale ever becoming one of those co-op schools where students all pitch in to cook and clean for each other.

    Good, because that would essentially put scores of workers out of jobs for no reason other than the fact that you are uncomfortable with them all being of the same race.

    > in fact, according to the U.S. census, in 2010, New Haven was 42.6 percent Caucasian and 35.4 percent African-American

    The student (undergraduate and graduate) population of Yale alone makes up nearly 10% of Yale’s population. But apart from that – are you asking for a dining hall staff that’s a balanced mix of white and black?

    > Because here’s the scary thing: when you get used to being served by people of a certain race, you start to conflate their profession with their identity.

    No, that’s only you.

    > You grow complacent, and you accept the status quo because, after all, as you reason to yourself in a voice down in the pit of your stomach that will never reach the light of day, that’s what they do. That’s who they are. And that is wrong.

    What the hell? Is this really what you’re thinking? Do most Yalies think this way? I’d hope most Yalies would be mature enough to know that not every old white man is the Sterling Professor of Economics, and not every black man is an employee of Yale Dining.

    • lakia

      I think River_Tam just about covered it. I doff my hat.

    • lacking_class

      Bravo, thank you for articulating my thoughts in ways I cannot.

      I know plenty of people (white and black) who would absolutely love the opportunity to work in the Yale dining hall. Especially somebody trying to get into the culinary field and/or pay for school.

      I am likely making less than a university dining hall worker now at YNHH. Hell, I’m jealous.

  • eli1

    Thank you River for taking the time to write that out. Those are my thoughts exactly. Since I am not going to waste time summing up my thoughts completely I will just say that this is probably the stupidest article I have ever read. In any news outlet. Ever.

  • The Anti-Yale

    I repeat: How is it that there are no low income WHITE people in the census from which Yale Dining Hall workers is drawn?

    And regardless of River’s assertion to the contrary, the absence of white people from this low income pool is manifestly an indicator of institutional racism—the institution of American education.

    • lakia

      Please, please get a life.

    • River_Tam

      Race is only a side-effect. The culprit is poverty, regardless of race, as I’ve said many times both here and elsewhere.

      Remember that the demographic statistics may be misleading. Yale students (undergraduate and graduate) alone constitute a full 10% of New Haven’s population, and the percentage of white non-Yale-affiliated residents is much lower.

      > “About half of New Haven’s residential population is affiliated with Yale, while the other 50 percent are people who choose to live in New Haven, Fernandez said.

      http://www.yale.edu/opa/arc-ybc/ybc_alumni/story102.html

  • dm

    There are a number of white dining hall workers, and a whole bunch of white workers in the physical plant. It is far better to focus on how to partner with employees to make sure that their children have more opportunities than to bemoan someone’s current employment.

  • River_Tam

    Some insight into the demographics of New Haven (w.r.t race) from 2001:

    > “About half of New Haven’s residential population is affiliated with Yale, while the other 50 percent are people who choose to live in New Haven, Fernandez said.

    http://www.yale.edu/opa/arc-ybc/ybc_alumni/story102.html

  • The Anti-Yale

    Hit google images for “yale parade of comestibles” and judge the skin quotient for yourself.

  • penny_lane

    This piece is very poorly written. It relies on shallow observations and then the author’s feelings on the subject, and is more or less devoid of true critical remarks.

    I would be very interested in learning more about Ms. Brown’s background, what sort of racism she has witnessed outside of the Yale dining halls (she doesn’t mention that she has). Having a mostly black workforce is not inherently racist, unless you’re suggesting that white applicants are passed over because they shouldn’t have to serve Yale students (which is absurd, and in that case, the joke is on the racists). If you’re truly concerned about racism, you should be asking yourself not why there are so many blacks, but why there are so few Hispanics.

    You should also know that the Yale dining hall jobs are pretty awesome. The baseline pay rate is only 60 cents less than what I make (I have a Yale BA, 2010), so full-time that’s $32,000 a year–pretty good. They get overtime and reasonable vacation and sick leave, and they get health and dental benefits. In addition, Yale provides scholarships to the children of Yale employees who are in full time attendance of a community college. They even get free lunch from whatever is on the menu. You don’t know this because you don’t live in the real world, but lunch is not an insignificant expense, and Yale dining hall lunches are damn good. Moreover, the flexible hours of these kinds of positions also allow people to go back to school, if they choose, or be home when their kids get off the bus. No, it’s not a perfect job. But people without college degrees could do much, much worse.

    I work every day with low income families. I go into the neighborhoods, I go into their homes. I’ve seen families with young children who are in very bad shape, who don’t have running water, whose electricity gets shut off. The sad reality is that the children of these families probably won’t make it. The children of Yale dining hall workers? They will make it. The people who work for Yale dining halls are people who are making their way up in the world, who have the resources (financial, mental, physical) to care about their children’s education. There are currently two Yale dining hall workers running for public office, who have ideas about how to make a difference in their communities and want to make them happen. The people who land jobs at Yale are by and large immensely resilient people for whom I generally have quite a bit of respect.

    This is the reality of the situation that you ignore when you complain that they are the ones who serve your food.

  • robert99

    Well, most NBA players are black also. So what?

  • The Anti-Yale

    “Please, please get a life.”

    Are you kidding?

    This is more fun than Fruit Ninja.

    In fact it is a kind of INTELLECTUAL FRUIT NINJA—————- and just a recreational and instantaneous.

    • River_Tam

      Paul, I consider it more like Intellectual Angry Birds, with me being the yellow bird that goes really fast and you being the white bird that drops eggs and the YDN being the green pigs.

      penny_lane can be the red bird.

      • The Anti-Yale

        PERFECT !

  • penny_lane

    Interesting clause in Yale’s agreement with Local 35. Might answer some of your questions

    Section 27.2
    If a job vacancy is fi lled from outside the bargaining unit, preference
    shall be given to a minority and/or female candidate, provided that
    he or she is qualifi ed to perform the work, in a job title in which the
    University does not employ at least 6.9% females and 25% minorities.
    The University shall take reasonable affi rmative steps to attract qualifi ed
    minority and female candidates in order to meet the requirements of
    this Section and shall report to the Union every six (6) months on the
    hiring statistics.

  • The Anti-Yale

    “the YDN being the green pigs”

    I’m uncomfortable with this. YDN has done a great job of reporting and opinionation for the three years I’ve been posting. I wouldn’t want to make any porcine allusions regarding them—even if the Intellectual Angry Birds analogy makes sense otherwise.

  • yale_senior

    While I appreciate her honesty, I just find it really condescending how Ms. Brown seems to look down on these jobs as “bad jobs.” While she may not desire these jobs for herself, many of the dinning hall workers I’ve met absolutely love their jobs. I’m thinking of Michelle in Branford, who get’s to chat with students all day, and I don’t think would trade her job for anything in the world. I’m also thinking of a couple of the chefs I’ve met, who also love cooking for the students. Just because these types of jobs are not the ones you are seeking, does not mean that other people don’t like them.

    Clearly there are exceptions to this, and I’m sure some dinning hall workers would prefer other jobs, but insofar as the holiday dinner is concerned, I think that’s nuts. I remember my freshman year talking to a dinning hall worker who said that the freshmen dinner is that the he most looks forward to fall term.

  • yale_senior

    I also really don’t like her strange gut aversion to tradition. Obviously, tradition has been used as an excuse to disenfranchise people in the past, but there is a different between saying for example that Yale wants to uphold the tradition of only admitting men, and the tradition of celebrating and having an extravagant meal during fall term. In fact, I think all of great yale “experiences” are pretty much tradition whether or not explicitly labeled as such: Spring Fling, Harvard/Yale, YSO show, bladderball, commencement. Even many of Yale’s academic practices are traditions as well in that they originate in practices tens or even hundreds of years old such as the senior essay and majors.

    I think a life without traditions, is a pretty bland and boring one and I’m sad that after three years at Yale you still don’t appreciate tradition.

    • godard

      yale senior: are you sure you want to celebrate the harvard/yale tradition in light of the recent death, courtesy of a yale student? moreover, considering that you will get your degree next semester, you should learn how to spell. “dinning” at yale? unconscionable.

  • kingsofyale2

    “fit” is how corporate america keeps them out. i know someone who got asked by(hear it), a chinese interviewer at a fortune 500 whether they work well with other ethnicities. granted when he went for the interview it was all chinese and indians and he didn’t get the job. even the asians are racist with blacks. it’s scary.

    blacks need major major progress beyond slow steps to make a dent in their fortunes.

    • River_Tam

      > even the asians are racist with blacks. it’s scary.

      my asian family members are far more racist than my white family members or my black family members.

      ah, the joys of mixed heritage.

      • basho

        Nobody cares about your 8000 different ethnicities

      • basho

        Also, I’d bet my house that you wrote about this on your admissions essay

        • kingsofyale2

          lol. these are the “blacks” at yale. play both sides of the race game like cain: claim hardwork as the key for the masses and quietly play victim to the yale admissions team. we should start a campaign to get rid of all the low SAT suburban kids at Yale. fundraising be damned.

          • River_Tam

            lol @ “suburban”.

        • River_Tam

          I actually wrote about running cross-country and checked Decline to State as my race.

          When can I pick up the keys?

    • yalengineer

      ummmmmm

  • The Anti-Yale

    Just because you “love” your job doesn’t mean you don’t want to advance.

    • lacking_class

      What evidence supports that people are not advancing from these positions?

  • silliwin01

    “Yale dining hall lunches are damn good.”

    Everything you said in your post was beautiful, but with rare exception this statement is wrong.

    • penny_lane

      Compared to what your options are when you’re throwing a lunch together yourself every day on a budget? At Yale you get a hot meal, with options of entrees, sides, a salad bar, soups, sandwich fixings, bagels, cereals, deserts…Yeah, it isn’t gourmet, but it’s pretty tasty.

      • silliwin01

        Don’t conflate variety and convenience with quality.

        • kdaysandtou

          God, you’re insufferable. Yale Dining lunches are perfectly good for the $10.50 or so that they cost. Can you think of New Haven takeout/restaurant food that’s better for the price/amount of food you get? It’s certainly a nice free on-the-job perk.

          • silliwin01

            It’s $10.25 for an all you can eat buffet with low quality, decent variety, and good tea. I suppose it is a good deal for the price, but again, that doesn’t mean its’ worthy of praise as “damn good” as penny_lane suggested. Getting a three year old computer for $200 dollars is a good deal, but it certainly doesn’t make the system you are getting a good computer.

          • silliwin01

            The lack of support for my position encapsulates much of what I hate about going here.

  • claycaracal

    I agree with many of the above posters regarding Yale’s role in this phenomenon, which I believe is both descriptively and normatively limited. On the other hand, I would like to offer a possible interpretation of her motivations and arguments, in light of the fact that I believe many of you have been far too quick to judge her piece.

    @River_Tam: I am not friends with Miss Brown and do not know her very well, but I am reasonably certain that she’s at least partially black and certainly is not the kind of white, sheltered Yalie you presume her to be. Did you not consider that possibility when you read her indignation at the current situation? I find it ironic that, in accusing her of being condescending, you exemplified condescension by jumping to quick and unjustified conclusions.

    You asked “Would you be so disturbed if all the professors at Yale are black?” Would you not? The status quo is that the vast majority of well-educated people in the United States are of one race, a situation that I cannot and think should not accept. It is the exact reason why we have such structural correctors such as Affirmative Action. I think that Miss Brown’s point about complacency is spot-on, because complacency permeates your comments. I assume that you, as Miss Brown and I do, believe that all races should have equal opportunities to pursue the professions that interest in them; I also assume that you would agree it is highly unlikely that black people are intrinsically more interested in or better-suited for pursuing jobs in manual labor, even if give a choice. The apparent racial distribution in Yale Dining–or, for that matter, Yale students–is a byproduct of differences in opportunity, not of differences in interest or intrinsic ability. I don’t think that changing Yale Dining would make any difference, because it is a symptom of the underlying disease; at the same time, I am distressed that you and so many other Yalies actually offer the underlying disease as an explanation–a justification–for accepting the symptom in a complacent way.

    I agree with you that poverty is a determining factor, but so is race. I am sure that you are well-aware of the reluctance of countless African American and Hispanic students to strive to do well in and outside of school because of the perception that “blacks can’t get anywhere”. It is naive to pretend that their pride in their line of work is in any way a counterexample to the limitations our society places on their race. I think that one ought to take pride when one has tried to the best of his or her ability in life. Do you think that working at Yale Dining was the best that most of these people could have done? Maybe it was, given a lot of their circumstances. That is exactly why those circumstances must be changed.

    (part 1 of 2)

    • River_Tam

      > @River_Tam: I am not friends with Miss Brown and do not know her very well, but I am reasonably certain that she’s at least partially black and certainly is not the kind of white, sheltered Yalie you presume her to be.

      I don’t think I ever suggested that she was white, but I certainly do think she’s sheltered. I don’t know her personally (or anything about her), but I cannot imagine this piece being written by someone who’s ever thought about the challenges of actually keeping and holding a job.

  • claycaracal

    (cont’d from part 1)

    @dm: Again, I agree with you that perhaps Yale Dining is not the kind of exploitative structure that Miss Brown implies; rather, it is a representation of the exploitative structure at large. Although I think it’s great that you “have actually been out on streets” and “had a twenty minute conversation… with a construction worker”, as someone who grew up on the streets of a developing country, I assure you that those experiences do not suffice as an adequate education of the level of helplessness experienced by the lower class. Yale Dining does represent an opportunity for social mobility for many New Haven people, but that fact precisely exemplifies the structural injustice that we must work to rectify.

    Regardless of the execution of or localized points made by Miss Brown’s piece, at the end of the day, it points to the truth that our society is far from perfect and that there are serious, nauseating, unacceptable injustices, which manifest themselves in our everyday encounters. Part of our value as Yale students is the relentless refusal to accept those injustices no matter how accustomed we grow or how reasonable they may appear on an everyday basis. To that end, I applaud Miss Brown.

    (part 2 of 2)

    • nmmp

      Hey, great comment, very well said. People who write op-eds in this paper could learn a lot from you.

    • lakia

      The ideals Claycaracal expresses are those which apply to a 3rd world country, where people honestly will do whatever they can to improve their situation. Sadly, it does not apply in America, where far to many people simply believe it is “someone else’s” responsibility to improve their lot in life. Education is free here, all the way up to and including college, if you choose to apply yourself. Pre-school is free, 2 meals a day, in school, are free, libraries are free, the list is endless. So, the sort of hopelessness you describe has very little to do with the reality of this country today. Opportunity exists, therefore, so should hope, which is a far cry from the hopelessness of a society lacking our resources.

  • lokelyokel

    Many of the comments are hitting on the reason for black majorities in the dining hall somewhat, but not directly. The problem is that the jobs are actually too good. If wages were significantly lower and non-union, you’d have an ethnic mix (leaning hispanic), just like the McDonald’s down the road. Instead very good union jobs produce a lot of competition and hiring becomes preferential for people who know people – since social networks tend to follow racial lines once there is an advantage for one ethnic group, other members of the same ethnic group will continue to receive preferential treatment (if you’re white, most of your friends will happen to be white…). End product, majority black self segregating workforce.

    • penny_lane

      There’s an affirmative action clause in Yale’s agreement with the service workers union. I posted it above. But you are generally right on.

  • irreverent

    You don’t know anything about the dining hall workers except the color of their skin, it might be more valid if you explored what there socioeconomic status was, and their actual wages and benefits before you label them as victims. Did you interview any of them. Making assumptions based on skin color is a paradigm for racism. It is not surprising that doing blue collar work might be viewed as low class by Ivy league elites but outside the hallowed halls most people are happy to have a job. Coming from a family of carpenters I don’t view myself as superior because I do research at Yale. Besides if you want to talk about benefit to society you would have to put garbage collectors and plumbers at the top of the list because the biggest increase in life span comes from good sanitation. That includes proper food preparation. So flush your BS and MD and a get a useful job in the food service industry.

  • kingsofyale2

    oh please. give me a freaking break.

  • Sam

    This is the most poorly thought out thing that I’ve read in the YDN, and that’s saying something after this term. River Tam nailed it with her comment. Your disdain for people who work to earn a living is embarrassing. I have all sorts of problems with Yale Dining and with the unions that represent it, but you entirely miss the point.

  • The Anti-Yale

    YOU miss the point ( perhaps blinded by a caucasian mote in your eye?) !

    Read what Ms. Brown said:

    “After all, the event is reminiscent of a history of African-American subservience that, each Christmas, turned to joyful festivity”

  • RexMottram08

    It is nearly impossible to add to River_Tam’s PERFECT, just PERFECT comments…

    So I will address the objection to the Parade of Comestibles:

    Ms. Brown, Do you not have ANY appreciation for a good feast?

    Feasts are an appropriate celebration of holidays, victories, weddings, births, graduations and coronations.

    Traditions matter.

  • VernonParrington

    This student ought to read some Bakhtin.

  • wtf

    Did anyone else find it ironic that the author’s last name is Brown?

    • anonymous12

      And the kid who wrote the response’s last name is White.

  • btcl

    “So it is true that I have no short-term solution to this problem. However, the current state of affairs absolutely requires a long-term solution. The fact that dining hall positions are filled primarily by African-Americans indicates that public education has failed to prepare them for other kinds of vocations.”

    So basically the author just admits that she has no solution, and that the root cause of the problem is a racial disparity that affects the entire country/world. So definitely a reason to blame it on Yale.

    • River_Tam

      It’s especially ridiculous because you could just as easily say:

      “The fact that is filled by indicates that public education has failed to prepare them for other kinds of vocations”.

      Meaning as long as people work jobs that the author thinks are beneath her, public education is necessarily failing someone.

  • DCHeretic

    No one is required to take a job working for Yale Dining Services. For jobs that attracts low and unskilled labor, the dining hall positions pay unusually well. Should Yale enact racial quotas for the dining hall positions?

    There is undoubtedly a legacy of institutionalized racism in America that has hindered the ability of many (most?) African-Americans to achieve their full potential. At the same time, a large percentage of African-Americans have fostered a culture that does not value intellectual achievement and focuses on past injustices rather than present opportunities. Until white people are willing to accept that the sins of their ancestors have present day implications and African Americans laud academic achievement as the path to success, the racial imbalances found in the dining halls and in other menial positions will continue.

    Alum 1995

    • RexMottram08

      Considering that prior to the Civil Rights Act blacks had more stable marriages/families, and all else being equal, a black man in the South earned more than his white neighbor, I wouldn’t rush to the “institutionalized racism” card.

      But that deficient culture point is spot on!

  • annwoolliams

    Yay ‘The Antiy Ale’ (I hate beer too) . Are you , as I am, shocked by the bile in some of these young comments?
    Over the 14 years I have employed skilled (‘unskilled’) employees in the cleaning arena, I have found the caucasian workers are more inclined to complain about their perceived indignity, in having to do the work. On the other hand, I find the Maori and Pacific Island employers I have, work harder, with less bitching. BUT…that is a generalisation.
    After all the arguments…whether ‘the dining hall pays unusually well’ or not , it bemuses me that this young generation can argue their way around the problem and out the other end, happy they have deduced that the workers are well paid and proud.
    NOW A SOLUTION; There is of course a solution which will benefit both parties;Yale and her employees.
    Yale pay your unskilled workers more. More than is usual nd more than anyone else. Even if, as I suspect, caucasian workers will not increase incrementally, Yale will be doing a great service to their ‘reason for being’; Education .
    The workers will have more benefits and in turn; their families and their children will have more choices and hopefully gain a better education …which is what Yale is all about.

    • lacking_class

      Stop trying to fix things that aren’t broken.

      Yale pays their “unskilled,” as you put it, workers way more than the average “unskilled” job. I put that word in quotes because I feel that working in a fast paced food service environment actually does require quite a bit of skill, probably much more so than what you would likely call a “skilled” job (such as management? HAHA!)

      SOLUTION: remove the affirmative action clause from the hiring policy, and hire equally based on skill and experience (real skill, not your opinion of skill).

      Summary: Yale student blames world for hiring policy that promotes majority African American employment in certain jobs, Yale student uncomfortable around African Americans for whatever ass-backward reason. Go Yale!

  • annwoolliams

    thanks Kathryn. I enjoyed your article. It is not relevant that you are ‘black’, ‘white’, ‘brown’ or ‘yella’. You are compassionate, and not as cynical as you think.

  • YaleMom

    Mrs. Woolly, Are you a Yale Mom too? I’m trying to get together a little social group to discuss these articles in the YDN. Some are real head-scratchers!

    Kathryn, I have a great idea. What if next year the Yale students throw lobsters at the Dining Hall workers? That seems a lot less racist to me.

    • lacking_class

      Your comment is a head-scratcher.

  • YaleMom

    On the other hand, Ashley’s roommate was accidentally socked in the kisser by one of those flying lobsters last year. Really traumatized the poor little honey! She had claw marks on her cheeks. Her hair smelled like butter sauce for weeks. Every time she passes a seafood place she bursts into tears. President Levin, when will the madness end? No more flying lobsters!

    • Inigo_Montoya

      YaleMom! I’ve missed you so much. I’ve also been meaning to tell you that I finally met your Ashley last spring, and she’s darling. You’ve clearly been a good parent. Moreover, we all (Rivs, PK, penny, etc.) deeply appreciate the sincerity and straightforwardness you bring to the YDN boards.

      • River_Tam

        You speak for us all, Inigo.

    • Ashley

      Mom! *I’ve* missed you at least as much as Inigo. Can’t wait to get home for Christmas and have your blueberry muffins. The comestibles in the dining hall, paraded or otherwise, just don’t compare.

  • Larchmont

    I don’t have much useful to add here, but I did wonder as I read this and the comments – so, it’s a problem that the majority of the dining hall workers are black, but it’s ok that the majority of the custodial and grounds crews are black? I’m not seeing anyone disturbed over a black guy spreading mulch in the plantings outside the building I work in or emptying my trash. Is it ok because they are mostly unseen while performing their work?

    • lakia

      You were right. You had nothing useful to add.

  • YaleCollegeDad

    I am shocked by the author’s sense of entitlement based solely on one’s race and/or the color and hue of one’s skin. Poorer and less fortunate first generation Asian Americans (Chinese, Vietnamese, Cambodians, etc..) living in New Haven do not even have the opportunity to get these prized unionized jobs in Yale’s kitchens and dining halls, yet they do the same type of jobs elsewhere providing the opportunity for their kids to get a higher education, many at schools such as Yale. They work, toil, persevere and sacrifice, 24/7, to provide this opportunity. My parents did this. The author is blind and lives in a box.

  • The Anti-Yale

    Who’s blind and lives in a box?

    NO OTHER RACE WAS BOUGHT AND SOLD AS CHATTEL FOR 100 YEARS, DENIED SUFFRAGE, DENIED EDUCATION (it was illegal to teach a slave to read), DENIED MARRIAGE RITES IN ESTABLISHED DENOMINATIONS, AND DENIED THE VERY STATUS OF PERSONHOOD BY THE U. S. SUPREME COURT. (Dred Scott decision)

    We ought to give every black person in the country free roo, board and tuition to any school they want for the next 100 years in reparations. And frree health care and free funeral rites since the nation as a whole was complicit in ruining slaves’ health and denying them established churches’ rites. (Sole exception: QUAKERS).

    The white power structure turned a blind eye to murder and rape of slaves (including President Jefferson) and in many cases was itself complicit in those evils.

    I am NOT shocked that the father of a Yale pinceling would be so blind as to propose that African American suffering was equivalent to the suffering of other discriminated groups. Slavery was an unmitigated, systematic, century long EVIL sanctioned by many so-called christian churches and by presidents, senators, and congressman and judges.

    Paul D. Keane

    M.Div. ’80

    M.A., M.Ed.

    • whatwhat

      “Father of a Yale pinceling?”

      Are you serious? Stop stereotyping. Apparently you’re the blind one. Did you not read what he posted? Here it is again.

      “Poorer and less fortunate first generation Asian Americans (Chinese, Vietnamese, Cambodians, etc..) living in New Haven do not even have the opportunity to get these prized unionized jobs in Yale’s kitchens and dining halls, yet they do the same type of jobs elsewhere providing the opportunity for their kids to get a higher education, many at schools such as Yale. They work, toil, persevere and sacrifice, 24/7, to provide this opportunity.”

      If it is institutional racism for African Americans to be hired as Yale dining hall workers, what is it for poor Asian American/Latin American immigrants who do the same type of jobs with less compensation elsewhere and are NOT fortunate enough to hold these unionized jobs in Yale dining.

      • YaleCollegeDad

        Thank You for your reply.

        • whatwhat

          You’re quite welcome

    • River_Tam

      > We ought to give every black person in the country free roo, board and tuition to any school they want for the next 100 years in reparations.

      As much as I am looking forward to my free shit, this is a laughably bad idea. No one is responsible for the crimes of their fathers.

      • RexMottram08

        River,

        Paul loves poor people. He loves them so much he wants them to INCREASE their numbers…

        • The Anti-Yale

          I don’t love poor people and i don’t hate rich people. I just like fairness. Make a 100 year mistake (and call it “chiristian”)? Then CORRECT IT.

      • The Anti-Yale

        No———– they just have them visited upon their sons.

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Dear Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

    Quote: “NO OTHER RACE WAS BOUGHT AND SOLD AS CHATTEL FOR 100 YEARS, DENIED SUFFRAGE, DENIED EDUCATION (it was illegal to teach a slave to read), DENIED MARRIAGE RITES IN ESTABLISHED DENOMINATIONS, AND DENIED THE VERY STATUS OF PERSONHOOD BY THE U. S. SUPREME COURT.”

    Please study your American History, but just don’t limit it to African-American history. I am quite aware and cognizant of everything you had said. Please delve a bit into Asian American history, if you so desire. Also, please stop shouting! Thank you in advance.

    This happened to the Chinese in America as well with “Indentured Servitude” which I contend was just as bad or worse as slavery, mainly because the Chinese in America never had a “Master” who owned them and looked after the slaves’ welfare with benevolence, but a boss who abused them, and once their services were finished, they were ransacked, and burnt out of their homes and entire towns and enclaves and hung on the nearest trees. The Jim Crow Laws of the South, not only applied to freed slaves, both male and female, but also to the Chinese laborers and former servants, mostly males without females, who were trapped in the racism and atrocities of America at this time. Now, I won’t go into the merits or “demerits” of each system imposed on African Americans versus the Chinese (aka Yellow Peril) any more. That being said, I find that your sense of “entitlement”, more 150 years after the fact of both slavery, and your failure to mention “Indenture Servitude” in this discourse, rather shocking, and tainted by your own biases, prejudices, as with Ms. Brown, the author of this piece

    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD ,

  • YaleCollegeDad

    CORRECTION:
    Dear Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.
    That being said, I find that your sense of “entitlement”, more than150 years after the fact of both slavery and “Indenture Servitude”, and your failure to mention “Indenture Servitude” in this discourse, rather shocking, and tainted by your own biases, prejudices, as with Ms. Brown, the author of this piece. I also find your sense of “entitlement” even more shocking.

    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD

  • The Anti-Yale

    Dr. Yale Dad, M.D. :

    I will NOT stop shouting.

    My system of elected government, my religion and my judicial system as enjoyed by my WHITE ancestors, countenanced the THE BUYING AND SELLING OF HUMAN BEINGS, (I WILL NOT STOP SHOUTING!) the raping of black women (and perhaps boys —or does that only matter if you’re in Paterno-land of the Papal-pricipalities? ) by white “masters”, (I WILL NOT STOP SHOUTING) and the forcible separation of infants from their mothers.

    Indenture is qualitatively out of the ballpark of selling human chattel. Even diningroomn furniture at an auction is treated with more respect than a black family was at a slave auction. We would NEVER separate the table from the chairs and the buffet from the sideboard, but for decades thought nothing of ripping amother from her chiuldren or husband from wife.

    I WILL NOT STOP SHOUTING—— FOR YOU —- OR for your docotorally delicate ears.

    PK

    PS:
    What kind of doctoring can a person insensitive to such injustice, such human degradation, possibly do?

    • River_Tam

      It was not your government. You are not your ancestors. Cleanse yourself of your white guilt, Paul.

      To quote Robin Williams: “It’s not your fault, Will”.

    • BaruchAtta

      CAPITAL LETTERS ARE NOT SHOUTING. THEY ARE JUST CAPITAL LETTERS. THERE WAS A TIME WHEN ALL COMPUTER COMMUNICATION WAS RESTRICTED TO CAPITAL LETTERS. SO WHAT? AND WHAT ABOUT TELEGRAMS? JUST READ THE TEXT. METAPHOR TO RACISM. YOU SHOULD WORRY MORE ABOUT THE CONTENT OF THE CHARACTER AND NOT THE TYPEFACE FONT.

      METAPHORS BE WITH YOU.

    • Galavantian

      It seems unfair to lump your oh-so-apparent white guilt on any American with pale skin. Heck, when American slavery was in its heyday my ancestors were still grubbing a living out of the dirt in Ireland. While I appreciate that the stripping of personhood and the unspeakable horrors of the middle passage were visited on African slaves by white slavers, it’s fallacious and destructive to get into this “white people bad” mantra that you so…enthusiastically…seem to believe.

      I think we can all agree that slavery was an abomination, but I do not feel personally guilty for it. And while I agree that the black community should be given help to recuperate from centuries of injustice, I don’t feel that I owe a personal debt other than that of one human being to another.

  • The Anti-Yale

    PPS:

    Perhaps you are the “doctor” Macbeth was looking for—who could cleanse guilt:

    MACBETH: Cans’t thou not minister to a mind diseased,

    Pluck from the memory a rooted sorrow,

    Raze out the written troubles of the brain,

    And with some sweet, oblivious antidote

    Cleanse the stuffed bosom of that perilous state

    Which weighs upon the heart?

    • whatwhat

      If it is institutional racism for African Americans to be hired as Yale dining hall workers, what is it for poor Asian American/Latin American immigrants who do the same type of jobs with less compensation elsewhere and are NOT fortunate enough to hold these unionized jobs in Yale dining.

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Hey Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

    Working in Yale’s dining halls and kitchens, has absolutely nothing to do with your last post. I won’t bore the readers by repeating it. Also, I won’t go into the merits or “demerits” of each system imposed on African Americans versus the Chinese (aka Yellow Peril) in America any more. My father and mother worked for much less in worse conditions with no fringe benefits in America their entire lives for the opportunity to buy their own restaurant with their meager earnings, which were much less than what the Yale workers earn, a fair wage by union contract.

    You seem to be talking to yourself. You avoid the question from the poster, whatwhat, “If it is institutional racism for African Americans to be hired as Yale dining hall workers, what is it for poor Asian American/Latin American immigrants who do the same type of jobs with less compensation elsewhere and are NOT fortunate enough to hold these unionized jobs in Yale dining???”

    In the context of this article, I see no evidence of “racism” in the dining halls and kitchens of Yale’s Residential Colleges and Commons, where Yalies have their meals made and served. These service jobs are coveted, with fringe benefits, such as health care, sick and vacation days and overtime, based on contracts negotiated by unions. My father only dreamt of a job like these when he worked the kitchens and as a waiter in Chinese restaurants, 24/7, without the benefits, until he saved enough money to buy a restaurant, and he still worked 24/7, in order to send his kids to Harvard, Yale, Columbia, as well as CCNY, and Cooper Union and onto medical and other professional schools, as well as grad schools for PhDs in Subatomic Particle Theoretical Physics.

    Continued with next post.
    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Continued from last post:
    Hey Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

    I have been to Yale’s dining halls many times when my son was a student there, I saw no Asian Americans working there, mainly because they did not get the opportunity. Or maybe, is it because of racism that poor Asians (many live in New Haven) do NOT WORK in Yale’s dining halls. Where are the poor or not so poor whites/Latinos in Yale’s dining halls? I know many people, who would almost die for a job in Yale’s dining hall. Some of them are my friends and relatives.

    You will be forever “shackled” if you continue with your ranting and raving, and especially your sense of entitlement. Using the race card in this context is old hat and this won’t fly anymore. The race card is a crutch and a hinderance for you. BTW, you apparently did not even know that Indentured Servitude of the Chinese in America replaced the labor of the freed slaves. The Chinese became more proficient in the building of the railroads than the white laborers and/or freed slaves. The Chinese became the farm workers. The Chinese developed the farmlands of the West and also built the railroads in America and Canada. That’s just history that you ignored as well. Racism existed and still exists against ALL racial minorities.

    You, Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed., seem do well will name calling and the use of ad hominem. You were the one who first pulled out your degrees with your rant in this supposedly civilized discourse on this public forum. I am not disparaging you or your degrees (M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.,), but if you have any civility in you at all, don’t EVER, EVER disparage or demean my degrees (MD-PhD),

    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Dear Hey Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

    Simply stated and asked, WTFFFFF???

    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD

  • The Anti-Yale

    “WTFFFFF???”

    This crudity from the abbreviated world of texting is exactly the level of discourse I would expect from the precedent of your previous posts.

    Did the Shakespeare tax you?

    Perhaps I should have cited Act, Scene and Line? Macbeth is quizzing the “doctor” in the final moments of the before Lady Macbeth succumbs to suicide from a guilty conscience.

    I gather from your jaunty dismissal of slavery as equivalent to ethnic and racial discriminations, that a guilty conscience is not cultural nuisance which afflicts the good doctor of philosophy.

    I do not have that same luxury. I was raised by my simple parents to be my brother’s keeper.

    Every advantage I have enjoyed in my Caucasian, upwardly mobile life was paid for by a society built on blood from the slavedriver’s lash.

    • whatwhat

      why do you refuse to answer my question?

    • whatwhat

      Here it is again: If it is institutional racism for African Americans to be hired as Yale dining hall workers, what is it for poor Asian American/Latin American immigrants who do the same type of jobs with less compensation elsewhere and are NOT fortunate enough to hold these unionized jobs in Yale dining.

      Try to remain on topic PK.

  • The Anti-Yale

    Stop pussyfooting around the sin—Ever hear that word in your values-neutral world? “S- I – N”. Sin

    What you call remaining “on topic” is a way avoiding the mountain while focusing on the molehill. SLAVERY requires national reparation. If that means every job at Yale and other institutions is offered to an African American before it is offered to other races or ethnic groups, SO BE IT.

    • River_Tam

      Why do sins require reparations by the descendants of the guilty? It’s this kind of thinking that leads to blood feuds and endless tribalism.

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Dear Sir….Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

    Answer the QUESTION!

    LOL!!! @ Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

    Yours truly,
    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

    • whatwhat

      High five- my major was MBB at Yale.

  • whatwhat

    Stop avoiding my question.

    So does this mean we should we offer reparations to Asian Americans (for the the oppression YaleCollegeDad mentioned), Native Americans (for taking their land), and other oppressed minorities in America before Caucasians? Should we offer jobs to these minorities before Causasians? Should we give offer Asian Americans students places in American universities before Caucasians as well? Do you see where this is going? As YaleCollegeDad mentioned earlier, your sense of entitlement is shocking.

  • The Anti-Yale

    I won’t address the molehills until the mountain is leveled. Addressing the molehills is a way of avoiding GUILT, a very practiced skill by slimey white-folks.

    As for Yale-MD-Dad-PhD’s comment “You were the one who first pulled out your degrees”,:

    I love to hang those letters on the end of a fishing line and see what bites.

    It’s only in the phoney-baloney-world of Academia that those alphabet-worms attract fish.

    I live in Vermont –the most egalitarian state in the Union (the only state in the Union to outlaw slavery in its Constition)— where “Yale” is a lock company, not a university.

    There’s no status up here in the Green Mountains.

    Letters after a name? Don’t be silly.

    That’s for Flat-landers.

    Paul D. Keane,

    Vermonter

    • River_Tam

      > Addressing the molehills is a way of avoiding GUILT, a very practiced skill by slimey white-folks

      That’s racist.

      • The Anti-Yale

        Not really. I didn’t say “all white folks” I said the “slimey” ones.

        • River_Tam

          I didn’t say “all black folks”, I said the “smelly” ones.

          It’s racist.

        • YaleCollegeDad

          Your sense of logic is unbelievable and nonsense.

          Yours truly, Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

        • Galavantian

          You misspelled “slimy,” anyway.

  • whatwhat

    Seizing Native Americans’ land and almost eradicating them from North America? I’d call that a mountain. Clearly you are avoiding guilt yourself, for not offering reparations to other oppressed minorities, at the expense of Caucasians in America (which you suggested earlier). Why not offer reparations all at the same time?

    In any case, my question has nothing to do with the addressing the mountain/molehills.

    If it is institutional racism for African Americans to be hired as Yale dining hall workers, what is it for poor Asian American/Latin American immigrants who do the same type of jobs with less compensation elsewhere and are NOT fortunate enough to hold these unionized jobs in Yale dining.

    This is just clarification of thoughts.

  • The Anti-Yale

    You’re talking to a Native American:

    My great great great grandmother was a Pequot Squaw.

    She was NOT BOUGHT AND SOLD AS PROPERTY.

    PK

    • River_Tam

      You’re talking to someone whose ancestors were all over the ethnic and racial map. They were all oppressed. Everyone’s ancestors have been oppressed if you go back far enough. Arguing the scale of oppression is counterproductive and silly, and trivializes the suffering of these various individuals.

    • River_Tam

      By the way, some Native Americans were bought and sold as property:

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_among_Native_Americans_in_the_United_States#European_enslavement

      And blacks never faced an attempt to exterminate their race. But that is neither here nor there.

      • The Anti-Yale

        RT:

        You are capable of less myopia. They were not SYSTEMATICALLY bought and sold by a process sanctioned by voters, legislatures, courts, presidents, and churches for ONE HUNDRED YEARS.

        • River_Tam

          Actually, they were. The only thing that ended it was the perception that African slaves were more docile and physically more capable. It is you who are myopic – the only difference between the conditions of these two groups is that there are more descendants of black slaves around to tell the tale.

    • penny_lane

      Yeah, but Paul, this young lady was. Right here in the United States. http://abcnews.go.com/Primetime/story?id=1596778&page=1#.Tt_oDLIk67s

      Now stop playing the victim. This deed of thine is no more worthy of heaven than thou art worthy of her. And by that I mean focusing on the horrible stories we tell about the past only serves to blind us to true injustice that is happening here and now.

      • River_Tam

        penny_lane, that was perhaps the most sickening thing I’ve ever read.

        • penny_lane

          What I wrote, or the article? I’m not saying that slavery was okay in the past, but I think we should feel more guilty that it’s still happening than that it used to happen.

          • River_Tam

            No, the article.

  • whatwhat

    Address my question PK please

  • JohnnyE

    If I were a grown man with an MD-PhD, and I found myself arguing with Paul fucking Keane on the internet, I’d be highly embarrassed.

    • YaleCollegeDad

      To JohnnyE, You are not. You know very little about the MD-PHD and Dr. YaleCollegeDad. If, If If…There is an old saying in my hood …If your aunt had testicles or gonads, she would be your uncle.

      Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

  • The Anti-Yale

    It’s an honor.

  • The Anti-Yale

    ” the horrible stories we tell about the past only serves to blind us to true injustice that is happening here and now.”

    The horrors of present slavery were not voted on my democratic legislatures, certified by elected presidents, and affirmed by Supreme courts and preached from its country’s so-called christian pulpits. It is the MAGNITUDE of the EVIL which was American slavery places it at the summit of Evil, right up there with the Holocaust.

    I grew up in New Haven. When the slave ship Amistad approached New Haven harbor still a mile out to sea, the stench from the cargo in its hold turned stomachs on New Haven shores. It’s cargo: Stacked like a layer of wood, human bodies side by side chained to the floor, rolling in vomit, fecal matter and urine and the the deceased whose bodies were decaying.

    This unimaginable bestial cruelty is erased by such irresponsible euphemisms as ” . . . the horrible stories we tell about the past. . . ”

    They were not stories.

    Their reality deserves more than contrition. It deserves reparation. ONE HUNDRED YEARS OF EQUAL AND OPPOSITE TREATMENT OF AFRICAN AMERICANS —-FOR STARTERS.

    • yalengineer

      The Great Leap Forward, the Killing Fields, and Tibetan Uprisings were also pretty evil. I don’t hear you talking about those much.

      • YaleCollegeDad

        Yes, we can also mention the Crusades, one of the most bloody and discriminatory, racist, and hateful periods in the history of mankind, by whites in the name of God in Europe and in the Americas against indigenous peoples.

        Yours truly, Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)
        Vote0

  • YaleCollegeDad

    I like the poster DM’s comment and agree totally..”Just because someone works a tough, manual job does not mean that they are a victim. Many are leaders in their community–Frank Douglass comes to mind–and many more are striving for better lives for their children.”

    “Playing the victim” for any kind of American, of any racial, ethnic, and religious group, in America, does more harm than good. Again, this instills a sense of entitlement with the use of the race card.

    I see no evidence of “racism” in the dining halls and kitchens of Yale’s Residential Colleges and Commons, where Yalies have their meals made and served. These service jobs are coveted, with fringe benefits, such as health care, sick and vacation days and overtime, based on contracts negotiated by unions. My father only dreamt of a job like these when he worked the kitchens and as a waiter in Chinese restaurants, 24/7, without the benefits, until he saved enough money to buy a restaurant, and he still worked 24/7, in order to send his kids to Harvard, Yale, MIT, Stanford, Columbia, as well as CCNY, and Cooper Union, just only in ONE generation after his own. I have been to Yale’s dining halls many times when my son was a student there, I saw no Asian Americans working there, mainly because they did not get the opportunity. Or maybe, is it because of racism, that poor Asians (many live in New Haven) do NOT WORK in Yale’s dining halls?

    I could extend this discourse even further, Is it because of “racism” that the Chinese dominated the Hand Laundries, and Koreans dominated the Dry Cleaners and grocery stores? Maybe, but I think, mainly, it is because they did not have the opportunity to do otherwise, so they made the best of these opportunities. The Italians did it in grocery stores and so did a Greek immigrant who started his grocery store in Harlem and built it into a multi-billionaire dollar business. He owns the Red Apple and Gristedes supermarket chains. His name is John Catsimatidis, multi billionaire. He had to drop out of college to do it. However, the Greeks dominated the Diners in NYC.

    Any more thoughts, DM et al.?

    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

  • The Anti-Yale

    “Playing the victim” for any kind of American, of any racial, ethnic, and religious group, in America, does more harm than good”

    Who’s playing the victim? I , a white skinned person with Pequot blood, am admitting my complicity and the complicity of my white ancestors , in the immoral and unethical (but unfortunately NOT ciminal) activity of supporting and participating in the systematic purchasing, breeding, and selling of human beings as slaves. Further, I am declaring that I (NOT YOU,NOT YALE, NOT THE U.S.A. ) feel an obligation to right that 100 year wrong ( the raping of the spirit of an entire race) by advocating a 100 years of reparations as a counter-balance.

    BTW I proposed this idea of a hundred years of reparations (free college tuition,/room/board and free health care for the number of black Americans who were slaves during the 18th and 19th centuries) at a NEH Summer Fellowship at Amherst College run by David Blight and colleagues on Slavery a dozen years ago. It was a proposal which the group felt had some merit.)

    PK,
    Vermonter

    • River_Tam

      > Further, I am declaring that I (NOT YOU,NOT YALE, NOT THE U.S.A. ) feel an obligation to right that 100 year wrong ( the raping of the spirit of an entire race) by advocating a 100 years of reparations as a counter-balance.

      You do not feel an obligation to right that wrong. You feel an obligation to force others to right the wrongs of your ancestors.

      > BTW I proposed this idea of a hundred years of reparations (free college tuition,/room/board and free health care for the number of black Americans who were slaves during the 18th and 19th centuries)

      None of the black Americans who were slaves are still alive, so your point is moot.

      • The Anti-Yale

        Absurd. I feel an obligation to voice my OPINION, not force anyone to do anything.
        “None of the black Americans who were slaves are still alive, so your point is moot.”

        No–they aren’t alive, their heirs are alive and since they inherited the legacy of a national shame, I think we ought to counterbalance that legacy. Simply a matter of cleaning up a mess the nation made. (Even a dog clean up its own mess.)

        Maybe we need a Genealogical Protection Agency as well as an Environmental Protection Agency.

        • sonofmory

          what do you do other than voice your opinion to make these “reparations” you are calling for?

      • YaleCollegeDad

        I quote River Tam’s points to Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed. …Very simple!! 1. You do not feel an obligation to right that wrong. You feel an obligation to force others to right the wrongs of your ancestors. 2. None of the black Americans who were slaves are still alive, so your point is moot.

        The overwhelming majority of Americans would agree with River Tam. I do.

        As a proud ASIAN AMERICAN, I don’t owe you or your ilk anything, Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

        Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Dear Sir….Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

    BTW, theantiyale (aka Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.). I was not talking to you…Thanks but no thanks.
    I am just saying, but you will continue with your rant/fluff anyway and talk to yourself all you want.. Just to let you know.

    Yours truly,
    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

    PS- The MD stands for Doctor of Medicine and the PhD is an acronym for Doctor of Philosophy (aka love of learning)

  • YaleCollegeDad

    As a proud ASIAN AMERICAN, I don’t owe you or your ilk anything, Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

    Best,
    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

    • The Anti-Yale

      My ILK ?

      As far as I know,

      I’m oneofakind.

  • The Anti-Yale

    Unplesant fellow.

    • YaleCollegeDad

      Hey, Mr theantiyale, aka Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.,

      Please don’t use the ad hominem, when you are lost for a logical response.

      Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

  • YaleCollegeDad

    PROUD is the word of the day!

    Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

  • The Anti-Yale

    This thread is a “parade of racism.”

  • YaleCollegeDad

    And you are part and parcel in your “parade of racism.” with your rants. And if I may add, a “racist”.

    • whatwhat

      I think most people would agree.

      • YaleCollegeDad

        Most certainly!

  • The Anti-Yale

    Parenthood and doctorhood are no guarantee of sensibility. I must have touched a raw nerve.

    PK

    Vermonter

    • YaleCollegeDad

      Dear Mr. Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed.

      Your degrees are no guarantee of anything or logical thinking, except for your use of the ad hominem.

      Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

  • lakia

    Can the Editors not stop one or two people from hijacking an entire comment board?

    • YaleCollegeDad

      Two people??? You do jest.

    • YaleCollegeDad

      There is only one “hijacker” on this thread, and we all know who he is.

      Dr. YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD

  • The Anti-Yale

    I can stop—-and will. I’m bored.

  • YaleCollegeDad

    About time!!

  • River_Tam

    I would like to see more skewering of Ms. Brown for her awful editorial and less of two grown men measuring their academic membership.

  • The Anti-Yale

    Not two, just one. And I’m not sure about the “grown”.

    I couldn’t care less about the letters after a name. That’s Phlat-lander Phoney-baloney.

    The Anti-Yale blog is my yardstick.

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, … Mr antiyale, aka Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed., goes on and on….. I am waiting him to use another moniker, handle or alias…

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Correction on typo: I am waiting for him to use another moniker, handle or alias…

  • The Anti-Yale

    I do not hide behind the cowardice of anonymous posts.

    Why would and M.D. and a Ph.D feel such resentment toward the opinions of someone of inferior academic rank? Why wouldn’t the good doctor merely ignore me?

    Did the inability to navigate Shakespeare rankle him. Perhaps the liberal arts really DO matter !

    “Now does he [Macbeth] feel his title / Hang loose about him, like a giant’s robe / Upon a dwarfish thief.”

    Paul Keane
    Former Flatlander

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Paul Keane is the “Former Flatlander” now, another moniker, and he muses over his supposed own “inferior academic rank” (his own words). Says who, but you? You are again talking to yourself. Are you loosing touch with reality? You may be having paranoid delusions coupled with delusions of grandiosity, as evidenced by your previous proclamations on this thread. These signs are indicative of psychopathology, i.e., a personality disorder, at the very least and in the worst scenario, paranoid schizophrenia. You may have Asperger’s Syndrome, which needs to be ruled out. You said, “Did the inability to navigate Shakespeare rankle him. Perhaps the liberal arts really DO matter !” No one ever said that the liberal arts did not matter. But then again, you digressed and became tangential, another ominous sign.

    It is you, Paul, who persists by ignoring my clearly stated points about the subject on this thread, and that of the readers, by digressing with your fluff, rant, and your agenda without addressing our questions directly. River_Tam 16 said, “I would like to see more skewering of Ms. Brown for her awful editorial”.

    Comprendre, Paulie?? If your answer is no, I suggest that you consult a mental health professional, i.e. a psychiatrist or a psychologist for an evaluation, and possibly for treatment with psychotherapy and/or medications.

    Yours truly,
    YaleCollegeDad

  • YaleCollegeDad

    From theantiyale 20 hours, 53 minutes ago
    I can stop—-and will. I’m bored.

    No, you can’t and will not stop. You are full of it!! You ignore others on this thread and continue on and on without stopping. with your fluff.

    Yours truly,
    YaleCollegeDad

  • The Anti-Yale

    Well I resumed the thread because a new issue has been opened with a vivid example from YaleCollegeDad: The value of a Liberal Arts education, an issue debated all semester in these pages.

    Further, there’s something fishy about the immaturity of “YaleCollegeDad” and his anger. I suspect someone other than an MD and Ph.D is hiding behind the anonymity of these posts.

    If not, I certainly wouldn’t want to seek medical advice from a man who uses “WTTTFFF” slang and engages in puerile name calling over academic credentials. Sounds pretty insecure to me.

    Paul Keane, NFL

    ( Not a Flat-Lander)

    • lacking_class

      You got owned.

      U Mad, Bro?

    • lacking_class

      also, ad hominem

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Dear Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed., Paul Keane, theantiyale, NFL, or whatever.

    You, 23 hours, 21 minutes ago, said, “I can stop—-and will. I’m bored.,” No, you obviously can’t. Maybe, just maybe, someone will be able to help you. That is if you want help. At the very least you don’t write capital letters now, but calm down, please. Remember your tirade when you shouted as Mr Paul D. Keane, M.Div. ’80, M.A., M.Ed., the antiyale, NFL, or whatever:

    Quote: “NO OTHER RACE WAS BOUGHT AND SOLD AS CHATTEL FOR 100 YEARS, DENIED SUFFRAGE, DENIED EDUCATION (it was illegal to teach a slave to read), DENIED MARRIAGE RITES IN ESTABLISHED DENOMINATIONS, AND DENIED THE VERY STATUS OF PERSONHOOD BY THE U. S. SUPREME COURT.”

    What has this did got to do with the coveted jobs in Yale’s dining halls, which my late Chinese father would have died for, and yet he persevered with much less opportunities and accomplished much more without the benefits given by Yale’s jobs today?? He was proud of his waiter’s job in a Chinese restaurant and proud of his previous job in a Chinese Hand Laundry and instilled the values of higher education into his family. He was not “angry” and we were not “angry” as a family despite the history of hate, prejudice and atrocities (hangings, burnings and raping in segregated Chinese towns, enclaves, in the”Yellow Peril” period) against the Asian Americans in our country’s pitiful history. Asians were denied by the Supreme Court of the US (SCOTUS) as well, especially for the early Chinese. Jim Crow applied to the Chinese as well. And these against the Chinese were not repealed by certain States until the late 1960′s. Well, you continue with more diversions from the points made by yours truly, YaleCollegeDad. Your flat denial by not even addressing my points belies reality, which is a defense mechanism used by you only. And still, you go on and on…..ad infinitum, in direct contradiction to what you said, “I can stop—-and will. I’m bored.,”

    With that being said, we, as Chinese Americans ( I think I speak for most Asian Americans, including Indians or South Asians) do not have the sense of entitlement that you and your ilk shout about! Well, for your own sake, please seek a mental health professional’s consultation and evaluation.

    Only the best,
    YaleCollegeDad, MD-PhD

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Dear antiyale or whatever

    You said, “…”I certainly wouldn’t want to seek medical advice from a man who uses “WTTTFFF” slang and engages in puerile name calling over academic credentials. Sounds pretty insecure to me”

    To be sure, I suggest that you consult your own MD on your present condition, which at the very least, is a proactive measure for your own good in order to prevent further worsening of your mental state, which is filled with your own anger. Really, your reaction is much worse than “anger”. Yet, you project your anger onto yours truly, YaleCollegeDad, by stating that I am the one who is angry. This is known as “projection”, another sign in the definition of “denial mechanisms” used for diagnosing psychological disorders.

    BTW, “WTF” is not name calling and is a commonly used acronym on the net and I assume that you know what it means, unless you are also blind and live in a box, as I had written about the author of the opinion at the beginning, when she played the race card with her opinion, which she is certainly is entitled to do. As we used to say in the “hood”, “It is what it is”. I don’t think you live in a box, just in dire need of professional help. Just saying…

    Best regards,
    Dr. YaleCollegeDad.

  • The Anti-Yale

    I will respond to insults from a man or woman with the self-respect to sign his/her name. I will not respond to cowardly anonymity.

    Go in peace.

    Paul Keane

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Dear antiyale or whatever,

    Thank goodness!! Thank God, and I do believe in a god.
    You are again resorting to name-calling and the use of the ad hominem, your usual modus operandi.

    The angry rant from the antiyale (or whatever) has finally come to an end, or at least that is what he says. He has yet to addres my well thought out and poignant points on subject of the thread and goes on with his projections, denials and anger. I really do not know the answer why he behaves in this manner, but if he seeks help, we can find the answers. We shall see.

    I frankly don’t the care or give a damn about who you are, Mr. antiyale, Keane or whatever, or what your academic resume is. I saw who claim to be by googling you and I say to you, So What??? I gave you, yes you, without knowing, who you really are, my views in a civil manner. You have not responded in kind, by using the ad hominem mostly. I judged you by your words, and thoughts, not by your academic degrees. You were the one who posted your “degrees” and started to play on this forum. I only responded in kind, but this really doesn’t matter, in regard to the subject on the thread. I never disparaged your degrees, but you did so with mine.

    Comprendre?? If not, for your own good, consult a health professional in the psychiatric/psychological services, of your own choosing, for much needed help.

    You are left without a credible response in this “discourse”, if you could even call it as such.

    Goodbye (hopefully for the last time), and good luck, Thanks for playing!

    YaleCollgeDad

  • The Anti-Yale

    I blush at this inordinate interest manifested in my mental health. It almost seems compulsive. Can you not leave it alone (This need need to denigrate my human frailties by towering over my small life with your doctorhood?) It frightens me a bit.

    Paul Keane

    • lacking_class

      ad hominem

  • YaleMom

    Hey kiddos:

    I wrote a poem for our thread!!

    Kathryn Brown wrote a piece,
    The commentators mocked her.
    But, I learned one thing from the thread:
    Paul Keane is not a doctor.

  • The Anti-Yale

    Brava Yale Mom !

    Thank God somebody has a sense of humor !

    Not-Doctor PK

  • lacking_class

    Why does everybody cry over spilled milk?

    The solution to the problem of racism, in my opinion, is not to apply equal and opposite treatment to folks in the next generation, who have not experienced or caused any of the injustices to our ancestors. The solution I think is to simply stop treating ANY race with any sort of preference.

    I have no credentials to back up what I say, but I’m going to course correct back on topic with the Yale dining hall situation. Remove the racist affirmative action clause from the damn hiring contract and problem solved. Hire based on SKILL and EXPERIENCE, rather than RACE.

    Idiots.

    • YaleCollegeDad

      @ lacking_class 1 hour, 12 minutes ago

      AMEN!!

      • lacking_class

        And to think I go to community college.

        Cheaper, Just Sayin

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Of course , Mr. antiyale reappears again, after he said, 1 day, 11 hours ago
    “I can stop—-and will. I’m bored.”. Whoever you are, you are liar, as evidenced by what you said. The truth of this matter that your credibility is ZERO, not to be believed or trusted.

    Dear Mr. antiyale,
    I am sure the readers know who you are, but I did not, until you identified yourself.
    For the benefit of the readers,

    The Anti-Yale
    Location: The Green Mountains
    Biography
    M. Ed., ’72 (Kent State University: Student Personnel Services and Administration in Higher Education)
    M.Div., ’80 (Yale University Divinity School)
    M.A., ’97 (Middlebury College: Bread Loaf School of English)

    The Anti-Yale http://theantiyale.blogspot.com
    FROM http://prehumous.blogspot.com/
    For God, for Country, and for Yale by Jeff Gordon
    March, 2010
    (printed with permission of the author : all rights reserved)

    Like Guy Fawkes, Paul Keane is a revolutionary. The two men share groovy beards and a desire to blow up the establishment, but there are a few technical differences. Paul’s target, instead of Parliament, is Yale. His grievances, not far from anti-Catholic discrimination, are elitism, racism and sexism. Paul plants not explosives but words, one blog post at a time. The most important distinction, however, and the reason to take Paul much more seriously, is that he knows his enemy. Paul Keane, M.Div ’80, is the Anti-Yale.

    Undergrads might recognize Paul’s name and self-appointed title from the Yale Daily News’s website. Every morning at five, before heading off to the mysterious job that he refuses to discuss, Paul scans the Yale Daily News (YDN) online edition in search of fodder. He finds an article reeking of Yale-centric privilege or condescension to New Haven and opens the comment box. His blast is swift—short enough for a generation weaned on text messages—and typically obscure in its allusion to characters from Old Yale’s past. He used to sign off: “Paul Keane, M.Div ’80.” Now he just writes PK. “I like nothing more than controversy,” says Paul, and that’s exactly what he gets. By the time Paul returns home, his comment has elicited numerous responses from Yalies exasperated with this Internet phantom and convinced that what goes on at Yale is none of his business. “Dude, are you like retired or something? Shouldn’t you be focusing on your day job? Glory Days are so…over.” Some posters respond to the substance of his message, but to many he’s an outsider, and they wish he would just go away.

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Page 2 Continued

    “First of all I’m not an outsider. Yale’s the outsider as far as I’m concerned. I’m a born and raised native of New Haven. You’re the outsider.” Paul Keane is quick to cite his credentials. He grew up twelve miles from Yale. His grandmother lived two blocks from Yale “in a ghetto apartment, a third floor walkup” with no hot water. His first encounter with inequality is painfully resonant to anyone who has ever seen a city: two blocks from bitter poverty sat “medieval palaces facing INWARD away from the community.” He wrote that in response to a YDN article about a recent string of murders in the city, and often shares his belief that Yale’s opulence is an “upraised middle finger” to the city, inducing envy, greed, and crime. But if Yale is the inward-looking solipsist, and its stained-glass windows are just one-way mirrors, can it really still be the outsider? Finding the proper prepositional relationship between Paul Keane and Yale—in, out, under, on—is complicated enough before you consider the fact he went there.

    Paul Keane got a Master of Education degree from Kent State in 1972, which was kind of like investing in the stock market in 1929. After the uproar over the 1970 shootings had tainted the school’s national image, his diploma was a “black spot;” he couldn’t find a job. So, restless in New Haven, he took the obvious step and applied to the Divinity School: “They accepted me, to their eternal regret.” Paul takes a lot of pride in his performance as a “hell-raiser” at Y.D.S., and I have a feeling the pun was intended. He tells a story about winning an award at graduation and rushing to the Dean in surprise because he thought the faculty hated him. “They do,” said the Dean, and the deadpan rings clear across the decades, “but they respect a challenge”. Paul jokes about his decision to attend the Divinity School as a last resort, but the issue deserves a closer look. As a child, Yale’s towers were a cruel reminder of what he couldn’t have. As an adult, he earned the keys to the castle. When Paul Keane criticizes Yale, he signs his name with the very authority it granted him.

    Paul has one particularly striking story from his time at Yale. While volunteering at the Medical School, he stumbled across a secret patient. She was a prostitute, she had just given birth, and she had the first known case of heterosexual AIDS in America. Paul urged the University administration to publicize the news and warn the community, but they refused. Like all good revolutionaries, Paul would not take ‘no’ for an answer. He called 60 Minutes; they broke the story, and guess who was the star witness. Paul uses this drama to speak to Yale’s disregard for its surrounding community. “It’s only prostitutes and drug addicts. They won’t affect our precious Ivy League clientele,” he satirizes.

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Page 3 Continued
    Speaking of those Ivy League types, “I always thought downtown Yale College was where rich people met to further their careers…and I still [do].” George W. Bush is his case in point, and don’t get him started on Henry Luce. As the editor-in-chief of Time, Luce may have brought “the Communist scare into every living room in America,” but his donations are also part of the reason that 55% of Yale undergrads now receive financial aid. “People of mediocre merit,” may still exist at Yale, but they come from all over the world and the gender spectrum—not just the sons of blue-blooded elites.

    And if Yale is a lost cause, why does Paul Keane keep writing? Paul says that in his youth, “Yale was a thorn in my side,” but now he describes himself as a gadfly, nipping at the elephant.

    Who’s the focus of this story? Who’s the insider and who’s intruding? If Yale were a thorn, Paul would run away, but it’s the opposite—he’s singularly hooked. He has degrees from four schools, but he’s not the Anti-Middlebury, not the Anti-Ithaca, and certainly not the Anti-Kent State. He is the Anti-Yale because “Yale is the best and the worst in our world:” his contempt is equaled by his respect.

    The one thing Paul truly admires about Yale is how it provides space for dissent and refuses to squash the gadfly. He may be confusing institutional goodwill with the YDN’s liberal comment policy, but I do suppose Yale’s tolerance is to be praised. That, or it’s a good thing Paul Keane didn’t grow up in the Soviet Union. In any case, as long as he’s still blogging, he’ll continue urging undergraduates to free their minds from the Yale bubble. And while Paul told me, “I don’t think old people should give young people advice,” it seems clear that his effort on the YDN message boards is just that. If nothing else, his advice is that young people should question their assumptions, reject authority, and engage in debate. In one post, he describes this work as “generational philanthropy.” If that’s not enough evidence that Paul cares how young people interact with his ideas, there’s one more thing. He wouldn’t tell me what he does for a living, so I followed my generation’s credo: when in doubt, Google. Paul Keane is a high school English teacher.

  • YaleCollegeDad

    Page 4 Continued
    But as much as Paul is writing for the students, he’s also writing for himself. The whole endeavor is, “an ego stroke. I see it as my tombstone. I’m writing my own eulogy.” There’s a story behind this morose, grandiloquent language. Just over a year ago, Paul was diagnosed with kidney cancer. But for the early detection, the disease would have spread to his bone marrow and—as he made a point of emphasizing, again and again—he would now be dead. This brush with mortality shuffled his priorities, self-expression came out on top, and the blog was born*. “They took out half a cancerous kidney, so I figure I’m going to say what I have to say before I kick the bucket.”

    What he has to say is profoundly ambivalent. Guy Fawkes had never been a Protestant or an MP, so his task was rather simple. Paul Keane has lived the very life he picks apart. Sometimes, he finds himself in the awkward position of defending the Divinity School from aggressively secular undergrads, siding with the faculty he used to drive nuts. In recognition of these moments when no one agrees with him, Paul’s voice slides from its focused intensity to a sedated melancholy: “I’m like J.D. Salinger. I’ve lived in Vermont for 25 years…and I really don’t care about the rest of society.” Besides the physical fact of his isolation, that statement rings untrue. This is a guy who wakes up at five every morning, grabs a coffee, and sits down with the Yale Daily News. For better or worse, his meditations always lead back to Yale. When I informed him that everyone knows PK, I could hear the cheer in his surprise—relishing an outsider’s return to the castles, albeit through fiber wire. He’ll keep writing, “Till I drop dead!”

    Or maybe he won’t. Every once in a while, a different side of Paul Keane pops out. “Young people don’t like old people,” he says, “it’s in their blood,” and you get the sense he’s speaking from experience. An old “hell-raiser,” it’s worth asking what the young Paul Keane would think of PK. Maybe this generation of Yalies doesn’t need his advice anymore. “After a while, you have to wonder,” Paul muses, “am I just being a nag?”

    Jeff Gordon is a sophomore at Yale. This essay was written in March, 2010 for his English class and is reprinted here with his permission.

    • lacking_class

      You know, working in a hospital this is the longest thing I’ve ever seen an MD write! Ha

      But yeah I think you have sufficiently discredited Paul Keane, and he has probably given up.

      • YaleCollegeDad

        AMEN AGAIN!!

  • YaleCollegeDad

    http://www.blogger.com/profile/10550720743396013127

    Paul D. Keane
    Location: The Green Mountains
    Do you believe that forks are evolved from spoons?
    B.A. Ithaca College(1964-1968); M.Ed., Kent State University (1969-1972); M.Div., Yale University (1976-1980); M.A., Middlebury College (1992-1997) Twitter: eustacebtilley

    My Blogs
    Academic Triptych: Emerson, Churchill, Commager
    Talking Turkey at Yale and Elsewhere
    D. Hoyt
    Bionic Bessie: Busbody for Good
    The Dillinghams of Fountain Place
    J. Edgar’s [Shut] Eyes Only
    After Irene, My Trees Bite the Dust Before the Next Hurricane
    Kent State Cartoon
    The Anti-Yale
    Raise High the Bridge Beam Carpenters
    All is Well: Irene O’Malley, Mother
    First Vermont Cavalry
    AIDS at Yale
    JD’s Thetford Bridge
    My Yale Graduation Gift-of-Gifts (An Activist’s Dream)
    Yale/New Haven : Class Warfare
    Sex and Abortion
    Phallic Transportation in American Literature
    (Miss) Isabel Wilder
    Crisperanto: Quentin Crisp at Yale Divinity School 1978
    Banquo’s Question: The 1970′s and the Orange Story
    Holden Caulfield, Date Rape Pioneer: 1949 !
    Paul Keane Digital Funeral Service: Posthumous Anti-Yale
    From Dartmouth to the Deep Blue Seas
    A Yankee Romance: Evangeline and JWB, 1900-1902
    The Maestro
    Holy Smoke 30 Years Later
    Talking Turkey Televised
    Doctor Bainton
    Sam Todd: Fugitive from God, Country and Yale ?
    Sparring with Yale Daily News
    Mr. McCarthy
    Mrs. Jacobs’ Garden
    silsbysoberhour
    Yale Political Union Colloquium on Kent State, April 1977
    The Grace of Time and Space
    Jeaniegray
    Churchill and Boy
    Douglas Clyde Macintosh Centennial Tribute September 11-17, 1978 at Yale Divinity School
    Bill and Melinda Gradgrind Foundation
    The Bound and the Unbound: Oedipus, Isaac, and Jesus
    The Mayor of Camel’s Hump
    Friends of Dr. Bob at Hanover
    JPA: The Web Master
    Willy Loman’s Children
    First Lady of Feminism
    Friends of Dr. Bob, Class of ’02
    Thornton Wilder Commemorative 1985
    Animal House: R.I. P.

  • The Anti-Yale

    The rest is silence.

    (Hamlet’s final words.)

  • YaleCollegeDad

    PK asked,

    “After a while, you have to wonder,” Paul muses, “am I just being a nag?”

  • YaleCollegeDad

    To Paul Keane
    PK asked,
    “After a while, you have to wonder,” Paul muses, “am I just being a nag?”
    SILENCE from PK, finally, maybe.

    Please listen to this from You Tube. I grew up in the era of Simon and Garfunkel

    the sound of silence lyrics
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BvsX03LOMhI

    Sound Of Silence – Simon & Garfunkel (live sound)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZGWQauQOAQ

  • YaleCollegeDad

    From Simon and Garfunkel, Please read the lyrics from Sound Of Silence

    Hello darkness, my old friend
    I’ve come to talk with you again
    Because a vision softly creeping
    Left its seeds while I was sleeping
    And the vision that was planted in my brain
    Still remains
    Within the sound of silence

    In restless dreams I walked alone
    Narrow streets of cobblestone
    ‘Neath the halo of a street lamp
    I turned my collar to the cold and damp
    When my eyes were stabbed by the flash of a neon light
    That split the night
    And touched the sound of silence

    And in the naked light I saw
    Ten thousand people, maybe more
    People talking without speaking
    People hearing without listening
    People writing songs that voices never share
    And no one dared
    Disturb the sound of silence

    “Fools”, said I, “You do not know
    Silence like a cancer grows
    Hear my words that I might teach you
    Take my arms that I might reach you”
    But my words, like silent raindrops fell
    And echoed
    In the wells of silence

    And the people bowed and prayed
    To the neon god they made
    And the sign flashed out its warning
    In the words that it was forming
    And the sign said, “The words of the prophets are written on the subway walls
    And tenement halls”
    And whispered in the sounds of silence

  • eli2015

    Oh, the joys of free speech on the YDN website.

  • BaruchAtta

    Antiyale: Let’s count the ways this situation is not “subservient” – all workers at Yale (and everyone else) 1. applied freely for the jobs 2. can quit at will 3. can apply for any other available job in the country 4. will be hired on qualifications only at any job in the country 5. are free to apply to any school or college 6. will be admitted on merit only (or given preference!) and so on. If you go to a restaurant, do you feel that the workers there are subservient? If you go to a professional (doctor, lawyer etc) are they subservient because they work for you? And so on. I didn’t realize that common sense was in so short supply at Yale.
    Then again, think frats and beer parties, even at Yale. And life continues, regardless of these comments.
    Furthermore: “It is hard not to notice the racial composition of the Yale Dining staff:…” Puncht farkeirt: It is really easy not to notice that. You worry about “racial composition”? Cause I don’t. I live in a mixed community, work in a State job where it is fully mixed race-wise. Have been for most of my adult life. Maybe if the author would get out more, he would change his outlook. A bit. His comments tell more about where he is coming from than what the reality of the situation is.

    • YaleCollegeDad

      To BaruchAtta

      AMEN!

  • The Anti-Yale

    It depends on whether you believe history is simply a chain of events or whether you believe history is redemptive.

    I believe the latter.

    • lacking_class

      History is both a chain of events and redemptive in that we learn from our mistakes, not make the same mistakes in the opposite way.
      You go ahead believing that you are providing redemption for your ancestors(or WHATEVER), I’ll be busy dealing with my own life thank you.

      • YaleCollegeDad

        To lacking_class

        AMEN!!

        YaleCollegeDad MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry) My illiterate Chinese American immigrant parents worked in a Chinese Hand Laundry and a Chinese Restaurant all their lives, but emphasized EDUCATION to their children, and they succeeded in a culture which nurtured the love of learning with there meager earnings by sending them to Harvard, Yale, Columbia, CCNY, Cooper Union, etc.. They had no sense of entitlement which Ms. Brown, the author, and the antiyale had in this piece.

  • The Anti-Yale

    Not just learn, but that social consciousness actually evolves and tries to heal the wounds of history. When the history of the last 50 years is written it may be seen as the most redemptive period in human kind.

    • YaleCollegeDad

      Via entitlement and the reparations? For whom after 150 years when these wounds were addressed? For Chinese Americans, who were not only wounded, but hung at the nearest tree branch during the Yellow Peril era, after they finished their Indentured Servitude?

      YaleCollegeDad MD-PhD

    • lacking_class

      WHAT WOUNDS???

      The wounds of people gone 150 years? Why are we trying to heal their wounds? Why are we wasting resources and effort as a society to “heal wounds” of history, tearing new wounds in the present with affirmative action garbage that not only causes the same(opposite) issue, but neglects to address the entire situation. As YaleCollegeDad has tirelessly said, Asian Americans have experienced the same sort of treatment as African Americans, yet the latter are preferred. Does this sound like healing to you? Are you high?

      I can understand the need to understand our past and acknowledge mistakes made by previous generations, for the purpose of AVOIDING those mistakes. I do not see the need to make the same mistakes in an opposite way. I feel like your head is shoved so far up your own (you know what) that I need to repeat myself.

      Maybe I need to put this in a different way, you don’t seem to get the picture. The mistake we made as a society was not to treat African Americans poorly. The mistake is the mere fact that people were treated differently based on race. Therefore, the solution is to treat people EQUALLY, not give preferential treatment to people based on race, as that is THE SAME DAMNED MISTAKE.

      Paul, you need to lay off the reefer, get out of the woods, and get with the program. The real world awaits you.

      -Drew, Lacking PhD, MD, and Class

      • YaleCollegeDad

        I agree with Drew, Lacking PhD, MD, and Class

    • lacking_class

      I’ll summarize this one more time, because this stupid argument needs to be tied into the article we are all commenting on.

      The Yale dining hall is an AMAZING place to work, and all qualified applicants should be compared by their work history, job performance, and other necessary metrics for this position.

      The practice of affirmative action, to me, just represents a lazy employer who wants to cut their pile of applications in half.

      Therefore yes, albeit for the wrong reasons, Ms. Brown makes a valid point, and the kitchen staff should not all be African Americans.

      • YaleCollegeDad

        I agree.

  • The Anti-Yale

    “The wounds of people gone 150 years? Why are we trying to heal their wounds?”

    Because America has a conscience, a mirror into which we reflect ourselves: The Constitution.

    • lacking_class

      Ex Concesso

      You win because I give up.

      • YaleCollegeDad

        Don’t give up

    • YaleCollegeDad

      The antiyale said 1 day, 3 hours ago
      [The wounds of people gone 150 years? Why are we trying to heal their wounds?"
      Because America has a conscience, a mirror into which we reflect ourselves: The Constitution."]

      I looked into the mirror, have you? Are you, the antiyale, hallucinating or at the very least, delusional?

      Yes, I do have a conscience, but I DO NOT remember, as an Asian American born in the USA, inflicting wounds on ANYONE in America. My parents, as immigrant Asian Americans, DID NOT INFLICT WOUNDS on African Americans either. Not on African Americans, and especially not on African immigrants to America (employed by Yale, given preference based solely on their race), nor on Native Americans, but also not employed in Yale’s dining halls, who should be by antiyale’s reasoning. Why are not Asian Americans not employed by Yale’s dining halls???? Where is antiyale’s reasoning capacity? He has none.

      The antiyale has NO basis for his view, and no credible response to my points of arguments. What else is new? Blah, Blah, Blah, Blah, Blah,

      Yours truly,
      YaleCollegeDad MD-PhD (PhD is in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

    • CrazyBus

      If you feel so guilty, why don’t you make reparations instead of preaching that others do it…lead by example.

      • YaleCollegeDad

        AMEN!!

  • YaleCollegeDad

    On a side note, antiyale, FYI 12/20/11 NY Times- OP-ED CONTRIBUTOR How Do You Prove You’re an Indian? By DAVID TREUER

    For Indian Tribes, Blood Shouldn’t Be Everything
    http://www.nytimes.com

    http://www.nytimes.com/2011/12/21/opinion/for-indian-tribes-blood-shouldnt-be-everything.html?hpw

  • The Anti-Yale

    This country was built on slave labor. Anyone enjoying the fruits of its present social and economic status –including myself — profits from that 100 year sin.

    As for reparations, I would gladly accept at 10% tax increase for such a purpose. Today, if Congress could manage to unbungle itself.)

    Happy Holiday,

    PK

    • CrazyBus

      Why don’t you just take 10% of what you currently earn and donate it to NAACP? That would be a good start, and then you would have moral ground to stand on, instead of just a high horse. All talk. No walk.

    • YaleCollegeDad

      To the antiyale

      This country was also built, farmed, mined, and served by Chinese coolie laborers and Chinese indentured servants, after the slaves were freed, and both groups were subjected to the racist Jim Crow Laws and racist acts of violence and hate against them from whites, yet the Americans of Chinese descent who, only several generations removed, are not asking for “reparations”, but you, PK, the antiyale, are asking that I, as a Chinese American, give “reparations” to African Americans more 150 years removed from Emancipation and recent African immigrants to America who were never enslaved, based solely on the color of their skins? Are you hallucinating? What are you smoking today?

      Chinese Americans don’t have the sense of entitlement that you have, or the author Ms. Brown has, which is absolutely shocking. Chinese Americans are not playing the victims and asking for reparations. With your twisted sense of logic, they should be asking.

      YaleCollegeDad MD-PhD (PhD in Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry)

  • River_Tam

    Lord baby Jesus are you two still going at it?

  • The Anti-Yale
  • ralph1905

    My grandmother, who happened to be white, was a cook in the kitchen at an elite private school in Providence, RI. I can remember visiting her in the kitchen near Christmastime when she would proudly point out the meals she’d be working on for the students who were far from home. The work was physically demanding, but she enjoyed that she was providing a personal touch of home comfort to the students who also worked hard and needed good food. My grandmother had died by the time I, a first generation to college student, walked through the gates of Brown Univ as a freshman. But, I remember her “gift” and always thanked the many staff, regardless of race, who worked so hard to make Brown my “home.” Throughout life there are many situations of server and “servee.” I find the most satisfying way to level the field is to treat the worker who assists you as the person he or she is with respect and dignity. Have a real conversation and know her/him personally, and be grateful.

  • connman250

    Blacks worked the cotton fields, Chinese worked on railroads, Europeans worked in factories and mines, Women and kids worked in the fabric mills………HO….HUM And the beat goes on!!!!!!!

  • connman250

    When we talk about the rights of people, one must remember that even today in some countries, women are not even allowed to drive a car or walk in front of a man. So in the authors opinion we are supposed to belive that because you work in a kitchen or do any manuel work, that it’s somehow connected to slavery? That’s quite a reach.

  • Bim

    Most of these comments drift from the author’s central point. And the event does bother students from New Haven Public Schools who attend Yale.

  • LouieLouie

    Although reparations to all the generations of people who the “white” man has imprisioned, stolen from and murdered is a magnanimous and liberal notion, it is impractical and impossible. Didn’t we try reparations with the American Indian? Reservations located in the desert, poverty, alcholism have been the consequences of a displaced people who had everything taken from them. All we can do as a nation, as a community of people of all races and backgrounds, is learn from history and not repeat the same offenses. That is easier said than done; in fact it is not done at all. Power and greed, the absolute drive to have more than your neighbor and the utter lack of ethical leaders is going to bring this country to its knees.
    Who has the absolute answer to why all the dining hall workers are African American, why are 90% of our political leaders white males, why do old, gray-haired white men still run our financial institutions….because we still haven’t learned from our past mistakes and so many prejudices still exist. Some time in the far future when we are all ‘light brown”, maybe things will change.
    Louie Louie, H. S. (High School)

  • The Anti-Yale

    Demographers predict that this year, for the first time in our history, whites will become a minority to persons of color in the USA.

    Miscegenation may be salvation.

    As for “reservations” as reparations. I suggest “casinos” as reparations. Let the Red suck the life out of the white via the white’s own greed and addiction.

    That would be justice —even poetic justice.

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