YCC Summer Storage limited

As the school year winds down, finals are not the only thing making Yalies anxious: Finding an affordable place to store their stuff over the summer presents another challenge.

Fortunately, there is some help in store this year.

For the first time, the Yale College Council will offer undergraduates the opportunity to keep their belongings in trailers parked on Yale’s West Campus — about seven miles from downtown New Haven ­— for a low fee. YCC Treasurer Brandon Levin ’13 said there are limitations to the new Summer Storage program: Each Yalie will be allotted only a small amount of space, and participating students will have only one day — May 6 — to drop off their belongings.

Still, Levin said he thinks the program will ease the move-out process for many Yalies.

“[YCC Summer Storage] will make students’ lives so much easier, and hopefully decrease levels of stress,” said YCC Treasurer Brandon Levin ’13, who has also headed the 10K Initiative committee this year.

Through the program, students can store one large item such as a couch for $25, one smaller item such as a coffee table for $15 or up to two boxes for $5 each. Summer Storage will take up about one-third of the YCC’s 10K Initiative, through which the council is reallocating $10,000 of its budget toward new programs to improve student life.

Levin said that because Summer Storage is a trial program, he hopes the YCC will expand it in the coming years if there is a demand from students, which he predicts there will be.

In the past, storage options for students who do not live near Yale or have off-campus accommodations in which to keep things over the summer have been expensive. Kate Aufhauser ’13 said that last summer she spent $277 at The Student Storage Company in New Haven just to keep “a couple of boxes.”

At the start of the 10K Initiative, Levin said, the YCC tried to identify pressing student needs that it could address through concrete programs.

“We identified a problem, and now we’re fixing it,” Levin said of Summer Storage. The other 10K Initiative programs are “Trash to Treasure,” through which the YCC will store and later sell items it finds during Spring Salvage, and “Hydration Station,” which makes environmentally friendly water containers available to student organizations throwing events.

Compared to traditional storage options, Levin said Summer Storage’s prices are “absurdly cheap,” adding that the YCC will spend about $3,500 of the 10K Initiative to implement Summer Storage.

Levin said he does not know the exact size of the boxes that students will be able to use for storage through the YCC’s program, but estimated that one box could hold about two microwaves.

Two students interviewed said they thought the concept behind the program was a good one and that they planned to use it, but added that they were concerned about the storage limits.

Lucy Arthur-Paratley ’14 said she likes that students will not need their own method of transportation for storing their belongings, and that High Street is a convenient drop-off location. But she added that she will probably have to pay for more storage space in addition to that offered through the YCC.

“I just have too much stuff!” Luke De Oliveira ’14 said, adding that he, too, will probably need more space than the YCC can provide this summer.

Students participating in the Summer Storage program can drop off their belongings at the High Street Gate between 10 a.m. and 7 p.m. on May 6. Pickup in the fall will also occur at the High Street Gate.

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