Fair boasts music, limited food

Yale Dining Brings the World to Old Campus

The residential colleges’ traditional Sunday brunch was replaced yesterday by a World Street Food festival. Some dining hall workers donned internationally themed attire for the event, which was organized by Yale Dining, the Yale College Council and cultural groups.
Yale Dining Brings the World to Old Campus The residential colleges’ traditional Sunday brunch was replaced yesterday by a World Street Food festival. Some dining hall workers donned internationally themed attire for the event, which was organized by Yale Dining, the Yale College Council and cultural groups. Photo by Snigdha Sur.

Students who flocked to Old Campus on Sunday afternoon savored an array of international treats, including candy apples and pears dipped in red wine.

The Yale College Council collaborated with Yale Dining and campus radio station WYBC to host the first “Fall Festival: The World Street Food Fair” — an event featuring food tents from across the globe and student-performed music. It ran from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., though most of the food was gone shortly after the event began.

No caption.
No caption.

The event served over 2,700 people, YCC Events Director Mathilde Williams ’11 said.

The idea for fair came about last year when Yale Dining mentioned the festival to the YCC during a meeting with the executive board, Williams said. It was YCC President Jon Wu ’11 who decided to feature an international landscape at the food fair, she added.

Then, over the summer, the YCC contacted cultural groups on campus and asked them to provide Yale Dining with recipes. Yale Dining tested the dishes before selecting the final menus, Williams explained.

“We wanted to do something new, especially since YSAC was eliminated last year,” Williams said. “We hope it becomes a tradition.”

Native food of America, Japan, Spain, Colombia, Greece, Asia (with sections for Thailand, Korea, China), France and Italy were served in eight separate tents.

Notable dishes included a French “Lemon Swordfish Brochette,” American “Hand-dipped Caramel Apples,” “Spanish Chicken Wings” and Greek pudding.

Tents were decorated with flags and other knickknacks; the organizers adorned the Spain tent with roosters. Servers at the France tent donned berets and students scooping up delicacies at the Italian tent were serenaded with music.

Ava Socik ’12 said the Italian tent had the best food.

“The cannolis were really good,” she said, noting that most Yalies could not try them since the cannolis had all been eaten by noon.

In addition to the shortage of food, Socik said there could have been every more international locations represented.

Next year, Williams said, the YCC hopes to spread the tents throughout Old Campus.

“We did it this way this year to have people swipe in,” she said. “But it was crowded in there.”

Kelvin Vu ’11 said he chose not to go to the festival because of the big crowds.

YCC also collaborated with WYBC to showcase student talent. But Williams noted that it was difficult to line up bands during the summer. Still, there were 15 musical acts from noon until about 4 p.m.

“It’s hard to get bands to commit over the summer,” Williams said. “We e-mailed them last week and asked for demo tapes and then picked the lineup.”

While Adela Jaffe ’13, who attended the fair with her freshman counselor, said the event still needs more organization, she said it has an important cohesive force: “I thought that it was a really good idea and pleasant to be outside and to get to mingle like that.”

Comments