Shvarts’ self-aggrandizing art project is evidence of a brain without a conscience

To the Editor:

Aliza Shvarts ’08 wants to make a statement. And legally speaking, she unfortunately has every right to do so. But by aborting as many pregnancies as possible, the intention of her statement is not “to scandalize anyone.” Hogwash. I’m tempted to speculate that when the magnificent The Interventionist’s Twizzlers-in-the-British-Art-Gallery-Plan failed to generate any questions except, “Can we eat the Twizzlers?”, Schvartz conjured up the “abortion-as-art” concept. Except this time, the stakes are higher than the risk of a handful of dead British painters rolling in their graves.

Ethically, such savagery is patently inexcusable. It seems to me that this should incur outrage not only in Americans who believe such broad “reproductive rights” are nonsense, but also in pro-choice Americans with any iota of understanding about what a difficult decision abortion is for some women. What happened to the gravity of abortion? Should we make a mockery of it for the sake of cheap art?

Yale should also be aware that if the University in any way subsidized the cost of this “masterpiece,” it will undoubtedly suffer a massive public outcry. (Not to mention the fundraising difficulties in the future.)

As a member of Yale’s miniscule pro-life (anti-abortion, anti-choice, whatever) population, I find the reactions of students such as Schvartz’ colleague Castillo ’08, whose master list of “beauty” likely includes “Two Girls, One Cup,” equally revolting.

Schvartz, for my senior project, I offer to buy you a hysterectomy … and a conscience.

Cooper Lewis

April 17

The writer is a freshman in Saybrook College.

Comments

  • Andy Perring

    To The Dean:

    So that you may better understand my point of view, you should know that my wife and I lost a perfectly healthy, unborn child at 22.5 weeks - just days before he could have survived - due to a placental abruption caused by a blood condition called factor five liden. October 30th, 2005 was the worst day of our lives and we will never stop hurting from our loss.

    I am sure you have guessed by now that I am writing to you in regard to your student, Aliza Shvarts' "art" project. I want you to know that my heart sank and my stomach wrenched when reading about what Ms. Shvarts claimed to have done. You should know that it doesn't make any difference what is true and what is not true about how she created her project. It doesn't matter if she made the whole thing up.

    We as a society now have a prolific and horrifying example of how people like your student trivialize human life to the point that a sick project like Ms. Shvarts is considered to be "art." This societal attitude of life being a cheap commidity is part of the reason so many young people have no concerns about hurting and killing others.

    This project is one of the single most disturbing acts I have ever heard of. Nothing about it has anything to do with art. As a human being with feelings and an apprecation for the gift of life, I implore you to stop this project from being displayed. Instead of being celebrated at a reception, Ms. Shvarts should be referred to a psychiatrist and to a person who can teach her about the dignity of human life.

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