Taiwan’s desinicization policy pulls at seams of One China

In his column “Question of Taiwan’s independence debatable,” (1/28) Carl Kubler makes an interesting case for the issue of Taiwan independence. Kubler’s article addresses a de facto control of Taiwan by the Republic of China. The vast majority of the world focuses on mainland China’s unwavering insistence of the “One-China Policy” while failing to acknowledge the existing hostilities and potential for war associated with the political divisions across the Taiwan Straits. The unjustified Desinicization policies launched and supported by the current pro-independent administration of the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), headed by Chen Shui-bian, are the most significant obstacles for peace across the straits and the mutual prosperity which is the common hope of both the mainland China and Taiwan.

Kubler states that “it is undeniable that Taiwan is increasingly developing its own sense of cultural and national identity.” Although the statement is entirely true, many in the West are completely misled on the origin of such a phenomenon. Considering that the Taiwanese population, excepting a small percentage of natives, is made up almost entirely of migrants from the mainland, the country’s seemingly new nationalism is not the result of a sudden “discovery,” but, rather, it’s driven by the manipulation of a central Taiwanese government eager to distance itself from mainland China.

Central to the success of such manipulation is promoting the notion that Taiwanese is a distinct ethnicity not entirely composed of Chinese blood. Many in the government have come to define “Taiwanese” as a mixture of Chinese and aboriginal influences. However, in a government where few individuals have any aboriginal blood and in a culture that largely ignores its native population, arguing for a Taiwanese identity based on aboriginal connection is as ridiculous and illogical as white colonists in America identifying with Native Americans as a reason to seek independence from the European powers.

Simultaneously, many pro-independence politicians, such as Lee Teng-hui of the Taiwan Solidarity Union (TSU), have emphasized the importance of Japanese elements in Taiwanese culture. Lee argues that it is Japan, not China, who brought modernity and the modern culture to Taiwan, and thus redefined modern-day Taiwanese culture. Yet one can say that Japanese colonial rule also brought modernity to Korea. Yet, it is also true that South Korean pop culture, like that of Taiwan, has strong Japanese influences, but no Korean would dare say they are “partially” Japanese as a result.

While seemingly arguing that they are both aboriginal and Japanese, the DPP and the TSU are also keen to educate their constituents in becoming less Chinese. The enthusiasm is most prominently reflected in the DPP-led “improvements” to the textbooks of Taiwanese primary and secondary schools. In many regions of Taiwan, the history and geography of mainland China have already become parts of “foreign” history and geography while the rigor and details in which the China-related subjects are studied has been drastically decreased. Some have even gone as far as placing Chinese classics as Confucius’ Analects and Sun Tzu’s Art of War in the collection of “foreign literature.” Much against the spirit of a country named “Republic of China,” the authorities have managed to educate millions with little or no knowledge of their ancestral homeland.

The Taiwanese rejection of China is further reinforced by the lack of direct communication across the strait. Chen’s administration, under the pretense of necessary security measures, have been eager in preserving the decade-old rule that requires any communication, whether through plane, ship or mail, between the mainland and Taiwan to be conducted through a third country or region. However, this method seems to serve no practical purpose in increasing security, as it is highly doubtful that, in the case of a mainland invasion, Chinese warships, fighter planes and missiles will voluntarily divert to a third country before heading to Taiwan, and it is also highly doubtful that diverting to a third country will discourage any Chinese spies and agents from entering Taiwan. Additionally, these measures prevent many in Taiwan from visiting the mainland, ensuring the continuation of their mutual alienation from one another.

Almost six decades after the Chinese Civil War, the political status of Taiwan is as controversial today as it has ever been. Yet, one thing about the future of Taiwan is certain: Mutual understanding between the two cultures must be achieved before any specific political problems can be solved. With its narrow focus on creating a distinct Taiwanese identity through Desinicization, the current DPP government has manipulated its people while frustrating the Beijing government and diminishing hopes for economic cooperation with the mainland. These policies, however, can only lead to the complete isolation of Taiwan from mainland China and its rapidly expanding global community.

Xiaochen Su is a sophomore in Davenport College.

Comments

  • concerned

    This article attempts to sound unbiased, but the selection of facts presented here out of context shows otherwise. Did the author do his homework?

    Although elements of "desinicization" exists, but this isn't the problem at hand. I point to the last paragraph, where "MUTUAL understanding" is claimed to be the goal, yet the blame is placed solely on DPP. How about explaining why communist China fails to be proactive, when it obviously has to political upper hand? The ball is in their court, so to speak. They should initiate talks without pre-condition.

    Many of us foreign observers view this as a bigger and more disappointing issue. Pls write about that instead, "Yale" scholar.

  • Jack

    Your article is highly flawed.
    1. There are many studies conducted and great logic and theory behind the fact that the majority of current Taiwanese people are neither full Chinese nor full native. If you are saying that Taiwanese people are completely (and 100%) Chinese in blood, then you are ignoring the fact that people lived in Taiwan prior to any Chinese influence being brought to the island. If you are here to argue that Taiwanese people are Chinese, then you are wrong. However, if you are here to argue that Taiwanese people have Chinese blood, and mixes of other types, then you are making the right case.
    2. If you are here to argue that race and blood does not constitute a nation, then you are correct. However, one must realize that China is the one that sends out messages similar to "Taiwanese people are our brothers in blood, they are Chinese." …etc.
    3. Direct flights in between Taiwan and China cannot be established not because of Pro-Independence leader Chen. It cannot be established due to China's unwillingness to treat Taiwan with any other status than to be a province of the People's Republic of China (of which is most certainly is not). Direct flights has to go through a third country thus to prevent the discussion of "Are flights from Taiwan considered international or domestic"?

    Is is clearly shown that you do not have a unbiased understanding of the China-Taiwan issue. Is it clearly shown that your views are uni-directional and highly inaccurate without the considerations of other factors.

  • Jack

    I would like to add another comment onto your post.

    You are correct to say that China and Taiwan must create better mutual understandings of each other; however, you are highly flawed in putting the blame onto the Taiwanese government. Some factors that the pro-independent Chen is spreading is only the truth. Is the Taiwanese identity distinct to that of the Chinese? Yes it is, although these two identities are highly similar in many many aspects.

    Your argument cannot stand because a nation must have a distinctive identity to be able to survive; or else what would be the need of a nation or country? One must treat China and Taiwan as equals here before can start discussion issues between the two nations. (or whatever you prefer to call them)

    It is funny because if your argument here is to state that people of these two nations should have better mutual understanding and communication between each other; then you are on the right tract. However, if you are here to argue that Taiwan does not possess the right qualifications to become an identity or nation, then you are making the wrong argument.

  • Guust

    You mentioned the White Americans yourself. They consider themselves Americans in the first place, hardly any descendants of the first colonists would add they are English as well.
    Most Taiwanese are descendants of Chinese immigrants who came to Taiwan in the 17th, 18th century. Since Taiwanese history was mostly disconnected from the mainland especially during the last 100 years they naturally developed a Taiwanese identity besides considering themselves as ethnic Chinese.
    Thus the DPP only brought into focus what the KMT suppressed. They completely ignored/denied that there ever existed a Taiwanese history next to the history of mainland China.
    At least you write "Mutual understanding between the two cultures must be achieved" thus accepting that there are different cultures on both sides of the Taiwan Straight. So please understand, that Taiwanese identity is not an invention of the DPP. May I suggest, speak to Taiwanese people with an open mind.

  • BenjaminL

    For some reason, the author does not mention that Taiwan has a per capita gross domestic product (PPP) six times that of the PRC, and enjoys democracy and civil liberties, while mainland China continues to be run by the same political party responsible for tens of millions of dead Chinese under Mao, and which also continues to deny its citizens the most basic political freedoms.

    In other words, Taiwan's government has a great deal of legitimacy, while the CCCP has no legitimacy at all.

    See:

    Minxin Pei, "The Dark Side of China's Rise"
    http://www.carnegieendowment.org/publications/index.cfm?fa=view&id=18110

    Minxin Pei, "The High Cost of Prosperity"
    http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/03/05/opinion/edpei.ph

  • Colorado

    Your arguments are obtuse in the presentation of Taiwan. This article sounds more like propaganda for Mainland China's view points.

  • Anonymous

    Tell me something I didn't know you would say.

  • Michael Turton

    Su writes:

    +++++++++++
    ….many in the West are completely misled on the origin of such a phenomenon. Considering that the Taiwanese population, excepting a small percentage of natives, is made up almost entirely of migrants from the mainland, the country's seemingly new nationalism is not the result of a sudden "discovery," but, rather, it's driven by the manipulation of a central Taiwanese government eager to distance itself from mainland China."
    +++++

    This is pretty standard pro-China fare, distant from the realities of Taiwan's identity, and lacking understanding of Taiwan's unique history and culture. The use of the Beijing code phrase "desinicization" marks this piece for what it is.

    What Su does not tell us is that China's drive to annex Taiwan is of recent vintage, and that for centuries Taiwan was considered outside of China. Since Su has raised the issue of "blood," it behooves us to point out that no ethnic Han emperor ever ruled Taiwan -- it was part of the Ching (Qing) empire, a Manchu dynasty of non-Chinese origin, along with many other places in Asia now independent. China's claim that Taiwan is "sacred national territory" is entirely a post-WWII invention. Observe, for example, that when Chiang Kai-shek unified China in 1927, nobody asked him where Taiwan was -- since nobody thought it was part of China.

    The emergence of a local Taiwan identity long predates the emergence of the current DPP as a political force. It grew originally out of the forces of Japanese colonialism -- one that obliterated differences between the islanders, as well as treated them identically as second-class Japanese. After 1945 the KMT reinforced this with its own oppressive colonial practices.

    The DPP's "de-sinicization" policies are aimed strictly at KMT policies that attempted to suppress this local identity by introducing a fictional and idealized version of Chinese culture in Taiwan -- and remove markers of KMT authoritarianism in Taiwan. No one is getting rid of Chinese languages, and we still continue to eat Chinese foods, worship Chinese gods, and celebrate Chinese holidays. This process is exactly the same as the ones currently going on in places like Estonia, where markers of Russian colonialism and Soviet authoritarianism are being replaced with local culture. For example, when the post office was renamed from "Chunghwa" (China) to Taiwan Post, this restored a name that went back to the Qing dynasty, when Taiwan had already had two governments issuing stamps before the Qing even established a national post office. The name Taiwan Post was used throughout the Japanese era and into the KMT era. But the KMT, to suppress the local identities, deleted Taiwan from its names -- Taiwan Shipbuilding became China Shipbuilding, Taiwan Telecom became China Telecom -- in 1996! and so on. The KMT's insistence on teaching on a China no one in Taiwan knows is being replaced by teaching on Taiwan -- Su's complaint that people will not know their origins is false -- their origins are on Taiwan, and that is what they will know. Finally!

    It is one of the striking double-standards of history that while markers of the USSR, Mussolini, Franco, and other authoritarian dictators in Europe have been removed, mostly to accolades in the international media, the exact same process in Taiwan -- restoration of the local identity -- has generated misunderstanding and mispresentation in the international media.

    There is one aspiration that I share with Su: I too hope that the Chinese will come to have a better understanding of Taiwan. As Su's piece shows, at the moment, they hardly understand it at all.

    Michael Turton

  • Anonymous

    I applaud the Chinese government for sending over such a eloquent agent!

  • Chris

    Taiwanese and Chinese populations might not be that much differently ethnically, but there are deep cultural and social differences.

    First of all, today Taiwanese people have trouble relating to China and the mainland Chinese population. First of all, many Taiwanese have never even set foot in China: they do not call China home. China, in many ways, is a foreign country with different cultural and social attitudes. When my "ethnically Chinese", 2nd generation Taiwanese parents visited Beijing a few years ago, what they saw was completely different from their home. The difference in the people, social customs and norms were extremely eye-opening.

    Indeed, today the Taiwanese identity is quickly developing and it is radically different than that of Mainland China: and the policies of the Communist PRC government is just further widening that identity gap between China and Taiwan. When Taiwanese look over to their Chinese neighbors, and they are constantly reminded how China tries to oppress Taiwan: threats to invade the island (memories of China launching missiles near Taiwan to intimidate voters before Taiwan's 1st open democratic elections), denying Taiwan observer status in the World Health Organization (WHO), bullying Taiwan about the upcoming referendum, and in general, China's efforts to isolate Taiwan from the international community.

    Now, put yourself in the shoes of a Taiwanese citizen: how can you consider yourself Chinese when you look over to China and see how they treat your homeland?

    If the PRC continues their oppressive and belligerent policies in dealing with Taiwan, the Chinese-Taiwanese identity gap will only be even greater.

  • hh

    Even I come from mainland, I think it is better to let the taiwanese to determine the future of taiwan. It is their right to choose their fate. But I doult if chinese government will allow taiwan to be independent. I can say more than 70% mainland people will support the government to attack taiwan if it choose to leave. Do't underestimate the determination of PRC and it's capability to manoeuvre public opinion. Keeping the status quo maybe a good choice. Taiwan people can enjoy their democracy, wealth, freedom and business opportunities with mainland. We just wait the change of the mainland or taiwan to give a chance to solve the problem in the future.

  • LKK

    "The DPP's "de-sinicization" policies are aimed strictly at KMT policies that attempted to suppress this local identity by introducing a fictional and idealized version of Chinese culture in Taiwan -- and remove markers of KMT authoritarianism in Taiwan." is the right point.
    Many American-born Chinese have been influenced by their PRC-born parents, who have been brain-washed by PRC's CCP government. Su is perhaps no exception. Taiwan is leading the way in Asia for seeking true liberty and democracy. During this process, Taiwan identity has surfaced and now over 75% of people living in Taiwan have identified themselves as Taiwanese instead of Chinese. Recent studies also indicated that over 85% of people in Taiwan have their blood mixed with Taiwan's aboriginal tribes. It was PRC and KMT that do not let people in Taiwan to know the truth. I echo Michael's commment "There is one aspiration that I share with Su: I too hope that the Chinese will come to have a better understanding of Taiwan. As Su's piece shows, at the moment, they hardly understand it at all."
    Perhaps Su should stop reading PRC newspapers and China Times. Instead, I will recommend Su to read Liberty Times and Taipei Times at http://www.libertytimes.com.tw and http://www.taipeitimes.com.tw. It will open your eyes.

  • LKK

    I applaud Michael Turton's comments. He has deep understanding on Taiwan issues. He even recognized the meaning of "Chunghwa". The artificial term of "Chunghwa Tribe" has been used a lot by PRC and KMT for propaganda purpose. The original term was tossed by S.Y. Sun meant to unite the tribes from Hans, Manchu, Mogul, Muslim, Turkish, and Hmong. As people pointed out, this kind of unification remains to be an idealism. Many tribes either become independent nations or seeking to become one (i.e., Tibet). The biggest fear of PRC CCP government is the other tribes follow Taiwan's footsteps, then the PRC's land will be reduced significantly (like U.S.S.R. reduced to Russia in the 1990s).

  • LKK

    "Even I come from mainland, I think it is better to let the taiwanese to determine the future of taiwan. It is their right to choose their fate."

    The above comment reads OK.

    "But I doult if chinese government will allow taiwan to be independent. I can say more than 70% mainland people will support the government to attack taiwan if it choose to leave."

    The it shows the brain-washing. "choose to leave"? Taiwan is never part of PRC, and this is a fact USA had publicly declared by State Department.
    If you look into PRC's education, you know the brain-washing has been consistent from elementary schools to university education. PRC people are only educated with one single belief.

    "Do't underestimate the determination of PRC and it's capability to manoeuvre public opinion."

    Especially PRC can block all information flowing into China, thus the CCP government can hide all the information that are pro-Taiwan.

    "Keeping the status quo maybe a good choice. Taiwan people can enjoy their democracy, wealth, freedom and business opportunities with mainland. We just wait the change of the mainland or taiwan to give a chance to solve the problem in the future."

    PRC and KMT has used this wishful thinking since 1949. There is no hope to expect PRC to change unless there is a revolution to over-turn the CCP government. PRC Government killed many students on June 04, 1989, and they still try to hide this fact from the younger generations. Before PRC government values liberty and democracy as Taiwan and USA do, there is little chance that PRC will change internally.

  • Anonymous

    In the PRC universities, students are required to take "China Unification and Taiwan Issues" for their course design. No wonder the brain-washing is so deep even in highly-educated intellects.

  • Anonymous

    I came from China more than 23 years ago, the so-called CCP brain-washed parent in your term. I always thought Taiwanese were not Chinese. It is a shame to consider them as Chinese. Hopefully the CCP gives Taiwan a chance to make it true, and don’t ever say you were once related to China.

  • KMT supporter

    I come from Taichung, a city in central Taiwan. I am a member of Kuomintang and a supporter of Ma Ying-jeou in the upcoming presidential election.
    While I agree with previous poster in saying that Su did not consider the role of mainland in such things as direct communication, but I am in shock that the posters here have simply equated "China" and "Chinese" with PRC and mainland citizens.
    Please understand that there are many people in Taiwan who still believe that they are both Taiwanese and Chinese and are doing their best to protect a country called "Republic of China"(ROC).
    Chen Shui-bian is trying to overthrow and destroy ROC!
    I too think PRC has deep political problems but I think people in the West should oppose Chen to save ROC, a country that supported America in World War II and Cold War. Chen is trying to make Taiwan less Chinese so he can create Republic of Taiwan and discriminate against the minority "Wai-Sheng Ren" (outside province people). we must stop him!

  • yukio

    "Chen is trying to make Taiwan less Chinese so he can create Republic of Taiwan and discriminate against the minority "Wai-Sheng Ren" (outside province people)"

    Here's the problem with your statement.. YOU are the Minority . yet the KMT .. DA Lu Tsai are the people that have controlled Taiwan against the original people of TW.. and yes many have origins in China.. but like many of the former British colonies they want to be a free independent country..KMT supporter you have a biased point of view because you are part of the problem.. If Chiang never came to TW this wouldn't even be an issue.. TW would already be free.. just because a few million people came over from China with the KMT and you lost your war with the PRC don't try and force the Taiwanese people into your ridiculous problem

  • KMT supporter

    yes, yukio, if my parents and I did not come to Taiwan with Chiang, we are probably dead today because the CCP will label me a "counter-revolutionary" thats why I appreciate Chiang, he saved our lives. But Chen is systematically trying to portray Chiang as an authoritarian dictator and a killer and ignoring as the Wai-Sheng Ren.
    So you are saying its ok that we are discriminated in Republic of Taiwan because our problem is just a "ridiculous problem" look, I am not going to PRC, so where do I go after DPP declare independence?

  • Anonymous

    Just to cite the facts from the survey: only less than 8% of people in Taiwan believe they are "Chinese but not Taiwanese", and about 15% of them believe they are "Taiwanese AND Chinese". The rest of them believe they are "Taiwanese ONLY". KMT still have a lot of supporters blindly believe the ROC is not a government on exile!! It will take time and effort for these KMT supporters to change their belief.

  • Anonymous

    We should have more PRC-brain-washed parents waking up and let Taiwan create its own nation. By living in USA for so many years, these parents should appreciate the great values of liberty and democracy. Wake up and educate your American-born Chinese to be more open in mind, instead of fighting for PRC propaganda to against the liberty and democracy.

  • Anonymous

    -----------------------------
    But Chen is systematically trying to portray Chiang as an authoritarian dictator and a killer.
    ----------------------------
    CKS was indeed a killer based on the recent studies. CKS ordered the 228 killings in 1947, and Taiwan's whole intellectuals had been wiped out. There were over 30,000 of them. Even before the solders moved in, KMT already collected the list of liberal-mined intellectuals (many of them are doctors, lawyers, publishers and bankers). It is clear that the 228 killings was well planned by CKS. From USA point of view, CKS has been a corrupted person in the beginning. If not because of Korean and Vietnam wars, perhaps Taiwan already became "Democratic Republic of Taiwan" instead of living under the ROC nightmare.

    -----------------------------
    so where do I go after DPP declare independence?
    ------------------------------

    You can either return to PRC to "unite" with your relatives in PRC. Or you can choose to remain in Taiwan and become a true Taiwanese as the citizen in Democratic Republic of Taiwan.

  • Canadian Politico

    We should not expect an unbiased and thorough analysis from this author. As a frequent traveller to the PRC, the unquestioned acceptance of government propoganda by almost all mainland-educated citizens is astonishing. The author's views seem to also have been contaminated by this phenomenon.

    To distill the whole issue down to the essentials reveals that it is about communism versus real freedoms and liberty, authoritarianism versus democratic representation, and judicial interference verus the rule of law.

    If mainland China gets rid of communism, authoritarianism, and judicial interference, how sinicized one part of China is compared to another would reveal how trivial this argument is.

  • hh

    Some taiwanese hate chiang for his dictatorship in Taiwan. But do you think taiwan could avoid from falling into the hands of CCP without Chiang and millions of soldiers from the mainland 60 years ago? Maybe you are right, if there was no Chiang, there would be no taiwan problem now. It is not because taiwan could be an independent state now, but because CCP definitely had the iron fist to control taiwan and change it into a "normal" province like Fujian or Gangdong.

  • Anonymous

    "You can either return to PRC to "unite" with your relatives in PRC. Or you can choose to remain in Taiwan and become a true Taiwanese as the citizen in Democratic Republic of Taiwan."

    While I agree with the overall sentiment expressed above, I cannot fail to notice the tale-tale signs of regional-discrimination present in your post. You are right, a person of Taiwanese citizenship should first & foremost be proud to consider himself Taiwanese & as such, ethnic/provincial/regional/etc heritage should come second. Ideally, an independent Taiwan should resemble something like Singapore, where although the Malays constitute only 15% of the population, the national anthem is nevertheless in Malay.

    The problem with the pro-independence movement in Taiwan is not so much with its cause as with its tactics, specifically the rhetorics that create tension between the benshengren & waishengren. By modern standards, Taiwan has been a de facto independent nation for almost sixty years & has evolved to place great emphasis on democracy, civil liberties and equal protection under the law. These facts alone merits independence for Taiwan.

    What confounds me is the pro-independence rhetoric that makes everything us (benshengren) vs them (waishengren). For example, 228, one of the main motifs in the pro-independence movement, came to symbolize waishengren's oppression and hatred of benshengren. Is this really true & can it be interpreted as such? The real event is much more complex then a simple us vs. them. True, CKS troops mowed down civilians, but is it that simple? Were the victims strictly benshengren? Were CKS & his troops the only murderers during this? During my time at Yale I happened to have checked out books from SML on 228, sources that are both pro-DDP & pro-KMT. The facts that were not disputed by either camp are as such: waishengren were also murdered during 228 & benshengren thugs also created terror during this. Let’s also not forget that CKS was known to have the perchance to counter protesting masses with gunfire, and where were these horrible acts committed? One of the most well known suppressions occurred in Shanghai in 1927. As such, a more nuanced look into 228 is required than one that basically paints the tragedy as evil mainlander troops of CKS coming Taiwan to destroy our way of life.

    Just remember this, when the dusts settle & if the wish of the pro-independence coalition comes true, what then? After the rhetoric, there will be some 14% of the population (the waishengren) who will have as much of a right to call Taiwan their home as the benshengren. They will be as integral to the well being of an independent Taiwan as the white farmers who worked the fields of Zimbabwe. It is conceivable that the divisive rhetoric of the pro-independence coalition could harm an independent, free, democratic Taiwan as much as the divisive rhetoric that harmed Zimbabwe.

  • Annie

    Taiwan can become its own separate country for all I care; just give us mainland Chinese people our imperial treasures back. They don't belong in a museum on your island, especially not when they were stolen by a government in flight.

  • ForeignerInTaiwan

    I am a foreigner who has lived in Taiwan for nearly 3 years and this is what I have seen:

    It is a big lie that everyone keeps telling about how bensheng discriminate against waisheng. Historically, for the past 50 years in Taiwan, it has been the complete opposite. It was waisheng with special quotas for plush government jobs, admissions to the top universities, teaching/police/army positions, CEO positions at the nationalized companies, etc.

    Today, what I hear is waisheng don't like saying they are Taiwanese and have all these stories about how poor benshengren used to be and how they don't have manners or how ugly the Taiwanese language is and how great the good old days used to be (you know, when you'd get locked up for being male and having long hair, where kids are beaten in school for speaking Taiwanese, where anyone suspected of being pro-democratic or pro-independence is locked up, etc).

    No one is discriminating against waishengren but boy do they love complaining (which is a goddamn miracle considering the ethnic violence you see in Eastern Europe, Africa, Malaysia/Indonesia, etc), and being benefactors of the past authoritarian regime those who benefited the most often complain the loudest about so-called discrimination.

    These are my observations, and I can almost count on someone complaining about how "Taiwanese" someone is (how is that supposed to be an insult anyways…?) being waisheng.

  • Anonymous

    --------------------------
    Some taiwanese hate chiang for his dictatorship in Taiwan. But do you think taiwan could avoid from falling into the hands of CCP without Chiang and millions of soldiers from the mainland 60 years ago?
    -----------------------------
    That is what KMT want people to believe. If you study the military history hard enough, you will realize it was USA's 7th Fleet that did the major protection. CKS's troops were only used as the last resort for PRC's massive invasion, which did not happen at all!!

  • Anonymous

    ------------------------------
    If mainland China gets rid of communism, authoritarianism, and judicial interference, how sinicized one part of China is compared to another would reveal how trivial this argument is.
    -----------------------------
    Though it is clear to us, PRC party-trained high-ranked officials will never give up the communist belief. PRC always think they are on the right side to against USA-led empire (by their imagination).

  • Anonymous

    ------------------------------
    Taiwan has been a de facto independent nation for almost sixty years & has evolved to place great emphasis on democracy, civil liberties and equal protection under the law. These facts alone merits independence for Taiwan.
    ---------------------------
    But it (at least) need a change for the nation name, and wide recognition by the international community. I hope USA is among the first few nations to recognize the true Taiwan nation.

    -----------------------------
    After the rhetoric, there will be some 14% of the population (the waishengren) who will have as much of a right to call Taiwan their home as the benshengren.
    -----------------------------
    The waishengren will certainly get their right after the transform justice is finally served. Many waishengren who did the killing in 228 never got prosecuted and put on trials.
    A recent book published in 2006 just released the first-tier decision-makers (including CKS). The ongoing study is focused on the second-tier and third-tier in the command structure. Your course instructor perhaps need to get a hold of the recent studies to improve the knowledge. Certainly CKS also killed waishengren during 228 and the White Terror (1947-1992) era. CKS always smeared them as "communist-lovers" and usually put them on death rows. As a matter of fact, there are quite a few waishengren strongly support for Taiwan Independence. Just like USA over 200 years ago, these waishengren had the guts and will to respect Taiwan's people for the true identity (as USA went through the declaration of independence).

  • Anonymous

    ------------------------------
    Taiwan can become its own separate country for all I care; just give us mainland Chinese people our imperial treasures back. They don't belong in a museum on your island, especially not when they were stolen by a government in flight.
    -----------------------------
    That was stolen by CKS and his troops, not Taiwan's people. I always think Taiwan can return these Chinese stuff back to PRC as long as the PRC government signs the permanent peace treaty with Taiwan. This is what PRC never gives up and have installed more than 1500 missiles targeting Taiwan. Even people in PRC did not know these missile installation and hostile attitude that PRC has. PRC's People Liberation Army always work behind the scenes, thus people's opinions in PRC never generate any significant change.

  • Anonymous

    ------------------------------
    It is a big lie that everyone keeps telling about how bensheng discriminate against waisheng. Historically, for the past 50 years in Taiwan, it has been the complete opposite. It was waisheng with special quotas for plush government jobs, admissions to the top universities, teaching/police/army positions, CEO positions at the nationalized companies, etc.
    -----------------------------
    A solid and true observation!! Well done.

  • Anonymous

    ------------------------------
    No one is discriminating against waishengren but boy do they love complaining (which is a goddamn miracle considering the ethnic violence you see in Eastern Europe, Africa, Malaysia/Indonesia, etc), and being benefactors of the past authoritarian regime those who benefited the most often complain the loudest about so-called discrimination.
    ----------------------------
    Very well said. Taiwanese people are very kind to tolerate the mainlanders who came to the island in 1949. By the way, who dare to say anything after 228 killings in 1947? Almost all intellects were wiped out. Whoever said something against the KMT government from 1947-1992 ended on either death or jailed for a long period of time.

  • Anonymous

    ------------------------------
    These are my observations, and I can almost count on someone complaining about how "Taiwanese" someone is (how is that supposed to be an insult anyways…?) being waisheng.
    -----------------------------
    One typical test is to ask people from Taiwan "Where is your motherland?" A true Taiwanese will say "Taiwan" instead of "China". A person brain-washed by KMT will say "China" referring to the old China before 1949!! Many waisheng will say "Taiwan" as the answer for no difficulty because they all view Taiwan as their motherland after 60 years (as USA citizens view USA as their motherland instead of UK or Europe). There are still people in Taiwan struggling with this identity issue.

  • Canadian Politico

    It should be pointed out that one of the central organizations of the Chinese Communist Party is actually called the "Propaganda Department." As a result, any citizen of the PRC should clearly denounce the CCP's censorship of information regarding free political thought before they expect anybody in the free world to give consideration to any of their arguments.

  • Chris

    I understand that benshengren have the right to feel some animosity toward CKS and other waishengren, but discriminating today between waishengren and benshengren does nothing for Taiwan.

    In order for Taiwan to progress and one day achieve international recognition, it is critical for all Taiwanese to be united. If not, the nation will just appear weak to both China and to the world.

  • Readin

    The tensions between waishengren (people whose family came from China with Chiang Kai-Shek) and benshengren (people whose families were in Taiwan before that) seem to play a significant role in politics. I don't know how much real discrimination there still is - I've been to Taiwan a few times and it hasn't been noticeable beyond political gripes, but I do know that the benshengren need to avoid paying back the waishengren tit-for-tat. Former President Lee was right to call for recognition of an identity of "New Taiwanese" consisting of people who love Taiwan. A new round of discrimination hold help keep the Chinese from invading.

  • Ben

    The lack of understanding on Taiwan's history and culture in this article suggests that the author is from China where the citizens do not have freedom of speech and the media are severely censored, especially on the subject of democracy. It is sad for most of us to observe that elite Chinese intellectuals like the author are unable to appreciate the value of democracy, even after studying in the United States for a while. This is exactly the reason why autocracy still persists in China, at this very moment, and many Chinese are very proud of it.

    The arrival of autocratic Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) regime from China after the World War II was a cultural shock to Taiwanese, because the new regime was far worse than the preceding Japanese colonial government.

    By carefully comparing the two regimes, Taiwanese realize that the life under the Japanese control had been much better, because their human rights, even as second class citizens, were respected by the government. The establishment of democratic Japan with equality to all its people was the result of intensive westernization and desinicization during the Meiji period.

    The appreciation of human rights by Taiwanese has been further reinforced by more exposures to the United States and the European Countries after the WW II. The development of the pro-independent Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) is the product of aforementioned historical background. It may even date back 400 years when many Taiwanese immigrant forebears tried to establish better lives in Taiwan by leaving behind the harsh rulers and poverty of China.

    Amazingly, many leaders of the free world are cooperating with China by advocating the anachronistic One China policy. Their words and actions often violate The Charter of The United Nations. The acquiescence to the irrational demand of China will only encourage its undemocratic behavior instead of fostering democratic transformation.

    Democratic transformation of China will advance the peace of Asia and the entire world. Taiwan democracy is the best model for China to emulate because of their close ethnic relationship. To advance democracy, Taiwan must desinicize as in Japan and Korea. Desinicization according to the Japanese model does not imply rejection of Chinese culture, which has been valued in many countries, including Japan, Korea and Taiwan.

  • Anonymous

    "It may even date back 400 years when many Taiwanese immigrant forebears tried to establish better lives in Taiwan by leaving behind the harsh rulers and poverty of China."

    That is exactly as far as Taiwan Independence Movement can be traced back. It is Taiwanese version for USA's "May Flower". One day, Taiwan will succeed, no matter what PRC believes.

  • Anonymous

    "Amazingly, many leaders of the free world are cooperating with China by advocating the anachronistic One China policy."

    We hope, with newly-elected president in 2008, USA will have better policy toward Taiwan issues. New "One Taiwan, One China" policy will be a good approach to solve it in Congress.

  • Anonymous

    "Democratic transformation of China will advance the peace of Asia and the entire world."

    How likely will it happen for CCP party to give up their power? When will PRC have other significant party that can compete with CCP? Before that happens, the 64-killings will happen again if students do a mass protest.

    What Taiwan inherited is Han's culture and it is already mixed with Taiwan's unique characteristics. Do not worry about Taiwan, worry about PRC instead!!

  • Anonymous

    "By carefully comparing the two regimes, Taiwanese realize that the life under the Japanese control had been much better, because their human rights, even as second class citizens, were respected by the government. The establishment of democratic Japan with equality to all its people was the result of intensive westernization and desinicization during the Meiji period."

    Excuse me? did you just associate imperial Japan with "democratic" and "equality"? Maybe you should talk to people in Korea, Taiwan, and much of Southeast Asia who suffered as forced laborers and prostitutes of the Japanese. The little technical progress Japan brought to these places are too little compared to the indignity suffered by the locals. Seriously, if the Taiwanese (and the Koreans and other Asians "honored" by Japanese colonization) thought being under Japanese rule was so great, why don't they just appeal to Japan to become part of the Japanese Empire again rather than declaring independence?

  • Anonymous

    Ben,

    “ .. author is from China where the citizens do not have freedom of speech and the media are severely censored “

    The arrival of autocratic Chinese Nationalist Party (KMT) regime from China after the World War II was a cultural shock to Taiwanese”

    many leaders of the free world are cooperating with China by advocating the anachronistic One China policy. “

    --- Well, none of them understand you or treat you nicely. I am wondering why? Are you a kid complaining about your parent?

    “..It may even date back 400 years when many Taiwanese immigrant forebears tried to establish better lives in Taiwan by leaving behind the harsh rulers and poverty of China. “

    --- Can you do it again? I am wondering where you are going this time.

    “ Taiwanese realize that the life under the Japanese control had been much better,…”

    ---- So you are Japanese or Japanese wannabe. Why don’t you go to Japan? You came from China 400 years ago, so Taiwan is just your current home. Nobody asks you stay in Taiwan if you don’t like it.

  • WZ

    Most of you posters are missing the point. The future of Taiwan will be largely driven by Chinese domestic politics. Uncle Sam won't fight to the last GI for Taiwan independence forever, one day, it will go away and cannot protect Taiwan anymore, it may be long in the future, but Taiwan will not be viable if China decides on that policy. Sure, Taiwan can be the Cuba of Asia, if China decides it should be completely ostricized from the Chinese economy and seize Taiwanese assets.

    When China becomes democratic, that will be the flash point, as people will vote to unite Taiwan by force or other means. Most of you Americans have absolutely no clue about how emotional this issue is for all Chinese, so obviously you can make you rational arguments, but it won't really matter to the end outcome.

  • Macca

    WZ says
    'Most of you Americans have absolutely no clue about how emotional this issue is for all Chinese…'

    This is very true. However, this is largely due to the actions of the aforementioned propaganda department. Without any form of democracy, nationalism is used as a means to legitimate CCP rule.
    When independent thought is allowed, people may realize they've been duped. How could the CCP spend decades telling everyone how evil colonialism is? Is that what we're trying with Taiwan? Did Chairman Mao really say Taiwan should be independent in the 1930s? Has Taiwan not really been part of China 'since ancient times'? Did no 'Chinese' Dynasty ever rule over Taiwan? Did the Qing Dynasty really say it did not rule over the whole of the island? With self-determination recognized all over the world, is it really so evil to allow it for a place which China never wanted, never claimed to have full sovereignty over, and which hasn't been a part of China since 1895?

  • Canadian Politico

    "When China becomes democratic, that will be the flash point, as people will vote to unite Taiwan by force or other means. Most of you Americans have absolutely no clue about how emotional this issue is for all Chinese, so obviously you can make you rational arguments, but it won't really matter to the end outcome."

    Democracies with individual freedoms and a free press have historically never voted for pre-emptive war.

    Besides that, the greater issue is that a Chinese attack on Taiwan would cause the Middle Kingdom to implode economically and then politically. This is the real reason why over 50 years into this conflict, an amphibious assault has never taken place. For goodness sake, they weren't even about to regain Quemoy or Matsu. This reveals the Achilles Heel. China is really just a paper tiger.

  • Anonymous

    actually, the real reason why the amphibious assault has never taken place because (1) the PLA never had enough of a capability to rapidly transport large amount of ground forces across the Straits (2) the US Navy always mentioned a presence in the region. Number 1 is actively being solved with technical progress and greater investment on the military and Number 2 can't exist forever as WZ have mentioned.
    People seem to forget the fact that an authoritarian state is at its most effective in times of crisis because it utilizes its superior central control to concentrate resources to deal with certain problems. For China, this was certainly the case for Korean War, Sino-Indian border conflict, Sino-Vietnamese War, etc. Especially for Sino-Vietnamese War, China was just out of the turmoils of the Cultural Revolution back then, why didn't it implode when that War started and cost tens of thousands of lives?

  • Canadian Politico

    Regarding post #47

    If the PRC were to go from its current economic status and its relative political stabilty and decend to the economic destitution and political madness at the end of the Cultural Revolution, this would constitute implosion.

  • Anonymous

    well, the Chinese economy was growing by around 6% a year and there was peace before Cultural Revolution came suddenly. I guess the PRC stood unified with widespread Mao cult. Now days, its basically the same idea, just replace Mao cult with nationalism.
    The people who say Chinese people of today won't go along with the War because Chinese people who too much to lose is wrong: prior to Cultural Revolution, ordinary Chinese people had the highest standard of living after almost an entire century of continuous war/political crisis. They had just as much to lose back then as they do now.

  • Eddie G

    Seriously. Why is it that it is always so easy to find these pro-Chinese pieces? Why put all this energy into writing crap? Here's a tip, go to Taiwan (I strongly suspect that you've never been there) and experience Taiwanese culture.

    Best regards from Sweden,
    Eddie

  • Taiwanlan

    To those who support the biased view of the author, the article "For the love of Taiwan" (www.taipeitimes.com.tw, then click the most read story at the top center) may offer the sentiment of people from Taiwan.

    Excerpt: - - To understand the situation of Taiwan at that time (of 1947 228 incident), the reader could just imagine the probable reaction of the US citizens if the current Chinese regime were installed in Washington.
    - - Amazingly the leaders of developed nations - - are also cooperating with China in suppressing the advancement of Taiwan democracy. Their actions contradict The Charter of UN and openly trample the rights of twenty-three million people of Taiwan
    - -The leaders of the world community, including those of China, must abide by The Charter of The United Nations, and support Taiwanese on their struggles of freeing themselves from the oppressions of foreign powers.
    - - In the court of civilized international opinion, the destiny of Taiwan should be decided by the people who truly love and identify themselves with Taiwan.

  • Canadian Politico

    Regarding Post #49 - Look, I agree with you that the communists use nationalism to legitimize their existence, however, a lot of you views and facts are very questionable. First of all, nationalism would probably evaporate if competing political parties and a free press was allowed. A political party that advocates invading Taiwan would have to defend the platform against opposing politcians was well as newpaper editorial boards. As a political stategy in a democracy, this would be a suicidal stance to take.

    Secondly, suggesting that China had a high standard of living before the Cultural Revolutions is a bit rich. The country had just come through Mao's failed Great Leap Forward. Between 1959 and 1961, 30 million Chinese starved to death. In addition, at this time, the Soviets abandoned their efforts to assist the Chinese economy - the civil infrasture crumbled without the Soviet expertise. Trust me, the was an economically horrific time for the country and the ordinary Chinese people had absoutely nothing to lose. Your suggestion that they had a higher standard of living after the Great Leap Forward is ignorant of history. In fact, it is probably this type of ignorance among the citizens of the PRC that allows any amount of nationalism and support of the communist regime to exist.

  • Fu Changshou

    I myself spent three years in Taiwan working and studying at NTNU, and I also traveled in the mainland, Hong Kong and Macau.

    I observe firsthand how the DPP's government's steadfast refusal to acknowledge the 1992 Consensus coupled with its reckless brinkmanship naturally signaled to Beijing that it was moving closer towards independence.

    For Beijing to build up such a massive military deterrent against Taipei suggests it is extremely concerned about Taiwan attempting to declare independence.

    The major English language newspaper in Taiwan, "The Taipei Times" reports on cross-strait relations in a highly skewed manner, vehemently condemning Beijing for something such as the Anti-Secession Act without stopping to mention that prior ouvertures from Beijing were met with slaps in the face: recall Jiang Zemin's 8 Points proposal in 1995 and Li Denghui's subsequent trip to the United States, or a second round of talks between Wang Daohan and Gu Zhenfu in Shanghai in 1998 that resulted in a promise for Wang to visit Taiwan for further talks in 1999, only for Li Denghui to announce that year that relations between Taipei and Beijing were "state to state."

    Chen Shuibian came into office in 2000 claiming to want to support the 1992 Consensus, but he has since declared it does not exist.

    Given this pattern of behavior, and Beijing's concerns for domestic politics, it would be impossible for Beijing to simply continue to extend carrot after carrot to Taipei.

    In his remarks about the campaign to desinofy Taiwan, Mr. Su's article touches upon the destructive nature of the DPP's increasingly assertive Taiwanese nationalism.

    Beijing is correct when it interprets moves by the Chen administration to change the names of official bodies (ie: Zhonghua Post) or freeze the National Unification Guidelines or erase Jiang Zhongzheng's legacy as part of a larger attempt to permanently separate Taiwan from the mainland.

    With the end of the Chen administration, Beijing and Taipei will have an opportunity to return to the spirit of the historic talks between Wang Daohan and Gu Zhenfu, which despite the disparities in the viewpoints of the two sides, nevertheless bore the fruit of good will.

    Both sides should put the hostilities of the past 10 years behind them and move forward, remembering what Wang and Gu strove to achieve.

  • Taiwanlan

    Here we go again! Fu Changshou is rehashing the biased view of Xu Xiaochen on Taiwan's desinicization. Therefore it must be emphatically reiterated that the desinicizationin is primarily for the advancement of Taiwan's democracy and westernization as in Japan and Korea.

    The meetings of Wang Daohan of China and Koo Chen-fu of Taiwan in 1992 and 1998 had only reached a controversial consensus that both sides agreed upon the existence of a significant difference in interpreting One China. Therefore Chinese could not speak for Taiwan and vice versa.

    For the benefit of the readers, it must be pointed out that DPP government is democratically chosen by the people of Taiwan, therefore it has the legitimacy of representing Taiwan. On the contrary, both CCP and the past KMT have controlled China with violence, therefore both parties are illegitimate regimes of China. Moreover they do not respect democracy.

    With above background in mind, the readers could understand why the overture of negotiation with equal footing by Lee Teng-hui was met by threats of missle attack by China. Chen Shui-bian's suggestion of negotiation without pre-conditioning was vehemently rejected by China and he was insulted as a scam of China.

    China has treated Dalai Lama, the revered leader of Tibet, with similarly undemocratic attitude after 1959 unprovoked military invasion. The ensuing destruction of countless temples and the repressive control of the Buddhism against the Tibetan tradition expose the blatant conduct of human rights abuse by China.

    China has thus far circumvented the legitimate Taiwan government and has worked with the self-serving opposition KMT leaders and legislators who openly betrayed Taiwan's tax-payers. Together, they conspire to undermine Taiwan's democracy and the pursuance of a nation free of foreign interference.

    Instead of crucifying the people of Taiwan, Tibet, also Hong Kong with repression and threats of violence for the purpose of unification, China could do better by directly negotiate with the legitimate representatives of respective groups, with goodwill.

    As to the Chinese people including Hu and Su, reading of the Nine Editorial Commentaries on the CCP in the http://www.epochtimes.com might help to correct the biased and skewed views of their world.

    The free world is not blind to the past disastrous failure of communism in China. More than 70 million innocent Chinese perished in the mindless Cultural Revolution and the endless class struggles which have benefited only party members. The vast majority of people appear to subsist in the condition of slavery, according to Ruan Ming.

    The human rights abuse of China is now at the center of world media scrutiny. Instead of showcasing the greatness of People's Republic of China in the upcoming 2008 Olympic Games, Chinese are seeing in bewilderment in the news that Human Right's Torch is marching in tandem with the Olympic Torch around the world. Countless exiled Tibetans and Chinese dissidents are demanding human rights. Domestically, discontented Chinese are rebelling against the tyranny with increasing number every year.

    Finally it is the time for CCP to assist Taiwan with goodwill for the advancement of democracy, before the patience of the free world runs out on the Chinese leaders and sending them to the Hague Internation Court of Justice for the crimes against humanity.

  • Anti-Falun Gong

    (1) The author above mentions Nine Editorial Commentaries on the CCP in the http://www.epochtimes.com. The Epoch Times is a propaganda paper run by the Falun Gong, an organization now dedicated to destroying the current Chinese government and establishing a senseless theocracy-like regime much in the same way Taiping Rebellion tried to do in the waning days of the Qing Empire. If Falun Gong is to succeed, persistent violence will plague China and wipe out any economic development over the last thirty years.
    (2) You should also not forget the fact that Republic of China also claims as their territory such restive regions as Tibet, Xinjiang, and even modern-day Republic of Mongolia, just look at its official map of China.
    (3) the DPP was not elected by the Taiwanese people to declare independence and throw the island into the midst of the war. They were elected to strengthen the economy of Taiwan in the shadow of rising Asian competitors such as China, India, and even Vietnam. By focusing on the rhetoric of Taiwanese independence, Chen Shui-bian entirely diverted the attention of the Taiwanese economy that is increasingly marginalized in the world economy.
    (4) Publications such as the Taipei Times systematically demonize the KMT as essentially undemocratic, harboring dictatorial views of the past, and even trying to form alliance with the CCP. If the DPP wants to preserve the democratic structure in Taiwan, this is not the kind of arguments it should run in its official mouthpiece. It is simply irresponsible to call your opposition as against the system when you are trying to working within the system.
    P.S. Taiwanlan, regardless of your views on China, at least get the author's name right (look at the first line of your comment) alright?

  • Fu Changshou

    The Taipei Times is the English version of the deep green "Liberty Times." The best articles in it typically come from freelance writers such as Richard Halloran and to a lesser extent Sushil Seth, who write intelligent commentary about East Asian, and in particular, Cross-Strait security issues. However, I suspect if they were to take more a pro-Beijing stance, they might have to send their work elsewhere for publication.

    The staff-penned editorials that often list no author tend to be venomous propaganda pieces accusing the Guomindang of this crime or that, using buzz words like "transitional justice" or predicting ruin should the Guomindang return to power. Since July 2005 when Ma Yingjiu assumed the chairmanship of the Chinese Nationalist Party, the newspaper has also been systematically attacking his character in their editorial column. Not that it's any worse than the Guomindang's assault on Chen Shuibian, but it proves the DPP is less honorable than it claims to be.

    Occasionally, criticisms of Chen are printed, but they always end with the same call "for the DPP to return to its core values." It seem to elude these writers that the DPP's core values have never resonated with more than a small minority of the population. Few want to change the constitution, the national title and focus on investing everywhere but the mainland. Even less interesting to most at this point is "transitional justice." The DPP would rather spend time trying to invent more reasons that Jiang Zhongzheng was bad than attempt to negotiate direct cross-strait flights, bring in consultants from the travel industry to assist it in developing a vital tourism sector (because it will never figure it out on its own) or streamlining bureaucracy to make it easier for foreign professionals to invest in Taiwan and work in Taiwan.

    The most offensive section of the newspaper is the letter section. It is nothing more than angry venting ground for Taiwanese nationalism. Read the fiercely nativist commentary of individuals such as Huang Jei-hsuan or Charles Hong.

    In the mainland, nationalists there fiercely call for reunification and are ready to fight to defend the PRC's territorial integrity. Yet their nationalism, when not tempered, could easily boil over and cause chaos.

    Young nationalists on both sides may be too young to remember the Wang-Gu talks and the spirit of reconciliation and cooperation that was achieved.

    From these two great statesmen, who truly put the interests of their country and citizens before their own, who strived tirelessly for compromise, we can all learn a great deal.

  • Rebel against rhetoric

    Here is the issue: Taiwan may or may not be part of China. But you must understand this point, Taiwan is NOT part of a communist tyranny. It NEVER will be. A democracy will not submit itself to such a notion, and a "One country, two systems" in this regard is a complete non-starter. The comments here from the communist sypathizers here are completely blind to this. It will never happen until the PRC is disolved and replaced with democracy.
    To all of you communists: communism was the scurge of the the 20th century. It has been relagated to the dustbin of history. Nobody wants it anymore. It is on a perpetutal decline. Just look at the immigration into communist states - it equals absolutely zero. People gravitate to countries with libertarian ideals. To think that communism can be spread beyond the borders of the remaining communist states by force is delusional.
    Only communist leaders, wannabe leaders, and hanger-ons care for this immoral system. Apart from these hacks, nobody else in the world wants it. Mainland China should reject the reality that it is currently just a totalitarian political party masquerading as a country. China should grow up and embrace a proper notion of nationhood. Then, maybe Taiwan will find unification hard to resist.

  • Democraphil

    In response to #55 and #56

    Falun Gong is a peaceful group with the adherents in many non-communist countries around the world. The followers do not have any political ambition. Their movement does not have any similarity to Taiping Rebellion. The persecution of the group is another evidence of blatant human rights abuse by China.

    Desinicization of Taiwan by DPP is to jettison the obsolete appellation of Republic of China which has been used by the Chinese Nationalist party (KMT) as their pretext to rule Taiwan, even Tibet, Xinjiang, and Mongolia. The news of Taiwan and the outside world are tightly censored in China, therefore the views of Taiwan by Chinese are utterly biased, as shown in this forum.

    People of Taiwan, including many recent refugees of Chinese civil war, just want democracy that respects human rights and the rule of law, just like the neighboring Japan and Korea.
    Liberty Times and its sister newspaper Taipei Times are established by people of Taiwan to counter the KMT dominated media. Before their establishment, the voices of Taiwanese were not heard in Taiwan, much less in the outside world. Not too long ago, Taiwan was frequently mistaken as Thailand, or China. Both papers do not belong to the government or DPP. The credibility of both papers is much better than those of KMT and CCP, the latter are merely the mouthpieces of the respective parties.

    Ironically both CCP and the past KMT favor autocracy. Both parties have unnecessarily sacrificed millions of innocent civilians that is unmatched by the holocaust committed by Nazis. Even now, the leaders of KMT, mostly educated in the US, still indulge in undemocratic tactics. They use their media to mislead public, dominate the judicial system to protect their undemocratic and unlawful activities. They still doggedly refuse to relinquish the illegally seized massive public assets.

    The China Interim Government, recently established by dissidents, believes the CCP is founded on violence. For the sake of rebuilding a free and harmonious society in China, they call for complete rejection of the despotic CCP rule.

    Japan has renounced the past mistake of military aggression and is now striving to be a peaceful country. They now assist developing countries with financial resources and the advanced technologies. On the other hand China has replaced the past Evil Soviet Empire by menacing the free world with its massive military forces and the cheap labors. Its autocracy controls the country with iron fists, challenges the free world, especially the US, and intends to reverse the democratic movement of the world by supporting the despotic regimes.

    Taiwan is not a part of China. Using the pretext of defending national integrity and inciting a Boxer's Rebellion-like irrational nationalism to deny democracy from the people of Taiwan is unconscionable. The1.3 billion people of China have never seen Taiwan, therefore they do not have right to speak for Taiwan.

    Moreover, CCP itself has greatly desinicized China by introducing the communism to the country. Consequently it has significantly changed the traditional Chinese Culture. It has also denied its people to the traditional freedom of religious association. Such communist nationalism contradicts Taiwan's struggles for democracy.

    CCP is so intolerant to the opposite opinion, to the point that it has never cooperated with KMT, even during the Sino-Japanese war. Therefore the unification of CCP regime and the democratic Taiwan with extension of Wang-Koo negotiation, will never succeed, even with the KMT controlling the administration.

    Harmonious coexistence across the Taiwan Strait depends only on the development of democracy on both sides, absolutely not by brandishing the CCP armed forces which has had disastrous records of killing civilians.