Actually, I do have every right to be angry

To the Editor:

I was extremely disappointed with the opinions presented on this page yesterday. As a gloating Republican called me arrogant, two columns from Democratic points of view told me to stop being so angry. I understand that we can “move beyond disappointment,” but I am also angry, very very angry.

Yesterday, NBC reporter Chris Matthews argued that voters in the heartland don’t vote based on fact so much as on belief (for instance, the belief that there are actually weapons of mass destruction in Iraq). Matthews defended this way of making political decisions. I personally find it revolting. Conventional wisdom says that Democrats are no longer a national party because they only appeal to the coasts. But Bush is no different: he only appeals to the so-called heartland! Americans have forgotten that four years ago, this was not such a conservative country. Bush has polarized the nation, and its conservatism is more on-par with the conservatism of the Middle Eastern countries we so loathe than with that of any Western nation.

Most importantly, I was disgusted by the “arrogant” and “self-righteous” comments by Brian Cook. I am the holder of an American passport, but I also understand, as Republicans don’t, that I am a citizen of a global community. I want our country to be a member in good standing of that community. But I feel that my country has betrayed me, and my partner and I are worried about a possible breach of our civil rights. If that happens, I may have the choice of seeking political asylum. And that is where the choice of Republicans is indeed ignorant: They have supported a president who is actually driving fellow Americans to consider the most drastic course of action — leaving home. I am not the only one who should be angry.

Jessamyn Blau ’05

Nov. 4, 2004

The writer is a staff columnist for the News.


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