Harvard council sends tailgate proposal



After weeks of uncertainty surrounding this year’s Harvard-Yale tailgate regulations, the Harvard Undergraduate Council is closer to a definitive game plan, HUC President Matthew Mahan said in an e-mail Tuesday. But members of the Yale College Council said they are still awaiting clarifications on several of the weekend’s details.

Harvard students as well as members of the Yale College Council received an e-mail from Mahan early Tuesday morning containing an attached list of tailgate guidelines. New details revealed in the e-mail included a $10 fee for parking spots in the undergraduate tailgate area at Ohiri Field, and a stipulation that only students with Harvard or Yale student IDs or recent graduates with printed tickets will be allowed into the undergraduate tailgating area. While fine points in the regulations may change after Harvard representatives meet with the Boston City Licensing Board this week in the hopes of obtaining a liquor license, Special Assistant for Social Programming at the Harvard Dean’s Office Zac Corker called the list “pretty final.”

The guidelines also clarified the previously reported ban on kegs, the limits on the quantity of alcohol an individual may transport — 20 gallons of malt beverages, three gallons of any other alcoholic beverages, one gallon of hard alcohol — and the ban on U-Hauls, RVs and Winnebagos.

“I think it’s a pretty good idea of how the game’s going to look,” Mahan said.

Harvard will have a definite list of regulations after appearing before a Boston city licensing committee, but Corker said the only regulations likely to change because of this hearing are the hours of the tailgate and other “minutia” unlikely to affect students’ tailgate plans.

But Yale College Council President Andrew Cedar ’06 said some regulations on the list remain unclear. Several issues, such as where buses transporting Yale students to Cambridge will park, if students will be allowed to tailgate outside of Ohiri Field, and where alumni and parents will tailgate remain unclear, he said.

Cedar said the YCC e-mailed Mahan these questions on Sunday but has not yet received a response.

“I think most of the problems are still there,” Cedar said. “It hasn’t cleared up all that much for us.”

Corker said tailgating will be allowed in some public parking areas, but these require the use of a costly specified tenHt vendor and food caterer and is geared mainly towards alumni.

The number of Yale-allotted parking spaces at Ohiri Field is also still undecided, Cedar said. Harvard has earmarked 50 spaces for Yale, but both Cedar and YCC Vice President Chancellor Carlisle ’06 said they have requested up to 85 spots. Carlisle said of the 50 spots Yale has now, two spots will be given to each residential college. The remaining 26 spots will be distributed to other student groups, with preference to groups who demonstrated a strong tailgating presence in past years, Carlisle said.

Cedar said the YCC will e-mail the student body the list of regulations as well as the applications for parking spaces on Wednesday or Thursday. Applications are due Nov. 8.

The YCC will meet with residential college SAC chairs later this week to discuss the guidelines.

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